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4.
Am J Gastroenterol ; 117(5): 798-801, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1835980

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The response to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) on immune-modifying therapies requires further investigation because previous studies indicate that patients on immune therapy might have decreased antibody concentrations. METHODS: We present the antireceptor binding domain antibody response over a period of 3 months in 217 patients with IBD who completed standard 2-dose SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine series. RESULTS: Almost all (98.6%) IBD vaccine recipients had a positive antireceptor binding domain antibody response at least 3 months after vaccination. Decreased antibody titers at 3 months were seen in a subset of patients on antitumor necrosis factor-alpha. Approximately 10% of the participants with high-titer antibodies at 1 month had a decrease to low-positive titers at 3 months, which was mostly observed in those on combination therapy and antitumor necrosis factor-alpha monotherapy. DISCUSSION: Larger longitudinal studies are required to define the response in IBD population and its clinical impact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases , Antibodies, Viral , Antibody Formation , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/drug therapy , Necrosis , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , Vaccines, Synthetic , mRNA Vaccines
8.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 20(7): 1609-1612.e1, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611654

ABSTRACT

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are recommended to receive vaccination against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), regardless of their immunosuppression status. Immunosuppressive medications represent a mainstay of therapy in moderate to severe IBD; however, their impact on the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine response remains unclear. Studies thus far have shown that patients with IBD on various therapies had detectable antibody responses after standard vaccinations.1-5 To date, one study has examined the kinetics of antibody response at 3 months after vaccination in patients with IBD, but data beyond this time point are not yet available.6 The aim of this study was to assess anti-spike antibody response 6 months after completion of standard SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in patients with IBD. Secondarily, we observed antibody kinetics over 6 months in a subset of patients post-vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases , Viral Vaccines , Antibody Formation , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/drug therapy , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , Viral Vaccines/genetics
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