Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 7 de 7
Filter
2.
Br J Nurs ; 27(22): S4, 2018 Dec 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30525966
3.
Br J Nurs ; 27(22): S20-S26, 2018 Dec 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30525969

ABSTRACT

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are lymphomas that may arise in organ, bone marrow or stem cell transplant recipients who are taking immunosuppressive drugs to prevent rejection of the transplant. The likelihood of developing PTLD depends on the type of transplant. PTLD is a potentially severe complication of post-transplant treatment, with an uncertain prognosis. Lymphoproliferative disorders can also occur in people taking immunosuppressants for inflammatory bowel disease. This article will explore PTLD and discuss the experience of caring for patients who developed lymphoproliferative conditions and required emergency stoma formation. The emotional and physical impact of surgery upon these patients, who have already experienced a protracted treatment journey, will be explored. Implications for practice for the lymphoma team and stoma nurse specialists involved with the care of these patients will also be considered.


Subject(s)
Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Lymphoproliferative Disorders/drug therapy , Organ Transplantation , Ostomy/nursing , Surgical Stomas/adverse effects , Adult , Crohn Disease/complications , Crohn Disease/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Lymphoproliferative Disorders/complications , Male , Nursing Process , Postoperative Complications/nursing , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control
4.
Br J Nurs ; 24(11): 563-7, 2015.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26067789

ABSTRACT

This article describes current treatments for individuals with a low rectal cancer. It examines the rationale for surgical treatment involving abdominoperineal excision of the anus and rectum (APER) and outlines how surgery for rectal cancer has evolved over recent years. Surgical advances mean the use of regional flaps is advocated to overcome the common problem of impaired perineal wound healing and the principles of this surgery are summarised. Postoperative nursing considerations relating to the inferior gluteal artery perforator (IGAP) flap will be discussed, as well as the importance of scrupulous wound care and patient education. The implications of this form of surgery on a patient's recovery and discharge planning are also explored.


Subject(s)
Rectal Neoplasms/nursing , Rectal Neoplasms/surgery , Surgical Flaps , Buttocks/surgery , Diagnostic Imaging , Humans , Neoplasm Staging , Postoperative Complications/nursing , United Kingdom
5.
Surg Laparosc Endosc Percutan Tech ; 22(5): 420-3, 2012 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23047385

ABSTRACT

Many colorectal procedures can be performed laparoscopically and frequently involve the formation of a stoma. This study aims to demonstrate whether there is an association between stoma complications and the operative technique: laparoscopic or open. A review was conducted of all patients undergoing stoma formation at a single center throughout 2009. Forty-four had a stoma formed after an open procedure and 33 using laparoscopic technique alone. The most common stoma complication was parastomal hernias; these occurred after 18% of laparoscopic compared with 2% after open procedures (P = 0.04). The highest rate of parastomal hernia was seen when the resected specimen was removed from the site that was later used to create a stoma (60%). This study has suggested that the use of laparoscopic surgery may influence the rate of stoma complications. One potential method of reducing the incidence of parastomal hernias is to remove the resected specimen through a separate incision.


Subject(s)
Colostomy/adverse effects , Hernia, Ventral/etiology , Ileostomy/adverse effects , Laparoscopy/adverse effects , Surgical Stomas/adverse effects , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Hernia, Ventral/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications , Retrospective Studies
6.
Br J Nurs ; 17(2): S22-7, 2008.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-18418933

ABSTRACT

Concerns over diet and nutrition are common among ostomists and their carers. It is important for healthcare professionals involved in the care of patients with a colostomy, ileostomy or urostomy to appreciate that stoma surgery changes the body's usual processes of nutritional absorption and excretion, so that informed support and advice on diet can be provided. A considerable proportion of patients admitted to hospital in the United Kingdom are malnourished, or at risk of becoming so. Patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery resulting in stoma formation are at particular risk as a result of the potential for preoperative malnutrition caused by the effects of their underlying disease and prolonged periods of fasting during the immediate pre- and postoperative period. Screening and monitoring of the nutritional status of individuals with a stoma should be an ongoing process, beginning preoperatively and continuing after discharge from hospital. This article will examine the effects of stoma formation on diet and consider ostomists' potential for altered absorption of nutrients. Current issues relating to patient nutrition in the hospital setting, their relevance for stoma patients and the role of the nurse in the provision of nutritional care will also be discussed.


Subject(s)
Colostomy/nursing , Ileostomy/nursing , Nutritional Sciences/education , Patient Education as Topic/organization & administration , Perioperative Care/organization & administration , Urinary Diversion/nursing , Colostomy/adverse effects , Humans , Ileostomy/adverse effects , Intestinal Absorption , Malnutrition/diagnosis , Malnutrition/etiology , Malnutrition/prevention & control , Mass Screening , Nurse's Role , Nursing Assessment , Nutrition Assessment , Nutritional Requirements , Patient Discharge , Perioperative Care/nursing , Surgical Stomas/adverse effects , Urinary Diversion/adverse effects
7.
Br J Nurs ; 13(12): 702-8, 2004.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-15284631

ABSTRACT

This article describes an initiative to improve the quality of nutritional support and information provision to patients undergoing colorectal surgery and stoma formation. It was identified that several aspects of the established hospital routine and catering system overlooked the specific nutritional needs of this group of patients during the postoperative period. This led to the formation of a multidisciplinary strategy group responsible for focusing on the nutritional needs of both those with new stomas and those undergoing colorectal surgery without stoma formation. To ensure that patients had the opportunity to eat suitable foods at regular intervals, a 'colorectal patients' snackbox' was introduced, together with a strategy for individualized nutritional support and advice before admission and on discharge.


Subject(s)
Colon/surgery , Colostomy/nursing , Diet , Nutrition Disorders/prevention & control , Postoperative Care/nursing , Rectum/surgery , Humans , Nutrition Assessment , Patient Care Team
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL