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1.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e059138, 2022 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788966

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aims: (1) to identify and describe similarities and differences in both adult and child COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy, and (2) to examine sociodemographic, perception-related and behavioural factors influencing vaccine hesitancy across five West African countries. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey carried out between 5 May and 5 June 2021. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: 4198 individuals from urban and rural settings in Burkina Faso, Guinea, Mali, Senegal and Sierra Leone participated in the survey. STUDY REGISTRATION: The general protocol is registered on clinicaltrial.gov. RESULTS: Findings show that in West Africa at the time only 53% of all study participants reported to be aware of COVID-19 vaccines, and television (60%, n=1345), radio (56%; n=1258), social media (34%; n=764) and family/friends/neighbours (28%; n=634) being the most important sources of information about COVID-19 vaccines. Adult COVID-19 vaccine acceptance ranges from 60% in Guinea and 50% in Sierra Leone to 11% in Senegal. This is largely congruent with acceptance levels of COVID-19 vaccinations for children. Multivariable regression analysis shows that perceived effectiveness and safety of COVID-19 vaccines increased the willingness to get vaccinated. However, sociodemographic factors, such as sex, rural/urban residence, educational attainment and household composition (living with children and/or elderly), and the other perception parameters were not associated with the willingness to get vaccinated in the multivariable regression model. CONCLUSIONS: Primary sources of information about COVID-19 vaccines include television, radio and social media. Communication strategies addressed at the adult population using mass and social media, which emphasise COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness and safety, could encourage greater acceptance also of COVID-19 child vaccinations in sub-Saharan countries. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04912284.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , Burkina Faso , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
2.
Pathogens ; 11(3)2022 Mar 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765801

ABSTRACT

The interaction of humans with microorganisms represents a subtle balance between harm and good [...].

3.
BMJ Open ; 11(12): e056853, 2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583091

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The current COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the entire world with increasing morbidity and mortality and has resulted in serious economic and social consequences. Assessing the burden of COVID-19 is essential for developing efficient pandemic preparedness and response strategies and for determining the impact of implemented control measures. Population-based seroprevalence surveys are critical to estimate infection rates, monitor the progression of the epidemic and to allow for the identification of persons exposed to the infection who may either have been asymptomatic or were never tested. This is especially important for countries where effective testing and tracking systems could not be established and where non-severe cases or under-reported deaths might have blurred the true burden of COVID-19. Most seroprevalence surveys performed in sub-Saharan Africa have targeted specific high risk or more easily accessible populations such as healthcare workers or blood donors, and household-based estimates are rarely available. Here, we present the study protocol for a SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence estimation in the general population of Burkina Faso, Ghana and Madagascar in 2021. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The SeroCoV study is a household-based cross-sectional prevalence investigation in persons aged 10 years and older living in urban areas in six cities using a two-stage geographical cluster sampling method stratified by age and sex. The presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies will be determined using a sensitive and specific SARS-CoV-2 IgG ELISA. In addition, questionnaires will cover sociodemographic information, episodes of diseases and history of testing and treatment for COVID-like symptoms, travel history and safety measures. We will estimate the seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2, taking into account test performance and adjusting for the age and sex of the respective populations. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval was received for all participating countries. Results will be disseminated through reports and presentations at the country level as well as peer-reviewed publications and international scientific conferences presentations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , Burkina Faso , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Prevalence , Seroepidemiologic Studies
4.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-291656

ABSTRACT

Background: Raising immunization coverage against COVID-19, in particular in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), is crucial in addressing the current pandemic. Additionally, in Africa reaching the necessary herd immunity threshold is jeopardized by factors, such as vaccine hesitancy. To build confidence in COVID-19 vaccines, it is important to understand and address the reasons for vaccine hesitancy. Yet, few studies for rural and urban Sub-Saharan Africa exist, which have analyzed these factors. Methods: This study reports on a cross-sectional survey in five West African countries (Burkina Faso, Guinea, Mali, Senegal, and Sierra Leone) to identify and describe factors influencing COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in rural and urban settings. The survey was conducted at a time when in these countries the roll-out of COVID-19 vaccines had not yet or only just begun. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Poisson regression models, with robust standard errors. The general protocol is registered on clinicaltrial.gov (protocol number: NCT04912284) Results: Findings show that in West Africa COVID-19 adult vaccine acceptance ranges from 60% in Guinea and 50% in Sierra Leone to 11% in Senegal. This is largely congruent with acceptance levels of COVID-19 vaccinations for children. Multivariable regression analysis shows that perceived effectiveness and safety of COVID-19 vaccines increased the willingness to get vaccinated, rather than socio-demographic factors, such as educational attainment and rural/urban residence. Primary sources of information about COVID-19 vaccines, include television, radio, and social media. Conclusions: Communication strategies addressed at the adult population using mass and social media, which emphasize COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness and safety, could encourage greater acceptance also of COVID-19 child vaccinations in Sub-Saharan countries.

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