Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 42
Filter
1.
BMC Palliat Care ; 21(1): 91, 2022 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1951173

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To report the experiences of End of Life (EoL) care in UK care homes during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: UK care home staff and family carers of residents in care home took part in remote, semi-structured interviews from October to November 2020, with 20 participants followed-up in March 2021. Interviews were conducted via telephone or online platforms and qualitatively analysed using inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: Forty-two participants (26 family carers and 16 care home staff) were included in a wider qualitative study exploring the impact on dementia care homes during the pandemic. Of these, 11 family carers and 9 care home staff participated in a follow-up interview. Following descriptive thematic analysis, three central themes concerning EoL care during the pandemic specifically, were conceptualised and redefined through research team discussions: 1) Wasting or losing time; 2) Maintaining control, plans and routine; and 3) Coping with loss and lack of support. Lack of suitable, meaningful visits with people with dementia in care homes resulted in negative feelings of guilt and abandonment with both family carers and care home staff. Where families experienced positive EoL visits, these appeared to breach public health restrictions at that time. CONCLUSION: It is recommended that care homes receive clear guidance from the government offering equitable contact with relatives at EoL to all family members, to support their grieving and avoid subsequent negative impacts to emotional wellbeing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Terminal Care , Dementia/psychology , Dementia/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , United Kingdom
2.
PLoS One ; 17(7): e0266153, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1933217

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Despite the significant mental health challenges the COVID-19 pandemic and its associated government measures have presented, research has shown that the majority of people have adapted and coped well. The aim of this study was i) to determine the proportion of people with mental stability and volatility during the pandemic in a North West England city region sample and ii) to establish group differences in psychosocial variables. Mental stability and volatility refer to the extent to which individuals reported change in levels of common mental health symptoms over the course of 12 weeks. No change in mental health over the 12 weeks reflected mental stability whilst change in mental health reflected mental volatility. METHOD: A two-wave-online survey (N = 163) was used to explore the psychological and social impact of the pandemic on relatively disadvantaged neighbourhoods within the region. The data collected represents 12 weeks of individual pandemic experience between mid-June and mid-December 2020. A three-level composite common mental health change variable was created combining self-reported anxiety and depression to group stable, volatile, and very volatile individuals in terms of the changeability of their mental health. Kruskal-Wallis with post-hoc tests were used to determine how people with mental stability and volatility differed on factors categorised within an ecological framework of resilience (individual, community, societal, and COVID-19 specific). RESULTS: Individuals categorised as 'stable' in terms of mental health symptoms (63.6%) had better mental and physical health; were more tolerant of uncertainty; and reported higher levels of resilience and wellbeing compared to 'very volatile' people (19.8%). These individuals also reported feeling less socially isolated, experienced a greater sense of belonging to their community which was more likely to fulfil their needs, and were more likely to have access to green space nearby for their recommended daily exercise. 'Stable' individuals did not report worrying any more during the pandemic than usual and tolerated uncertainty better compared to those in the 'volatile' group. IMPLICATIONS: The majority of participants in this sample were mentally stable and coping well with the challenges presented by the pandemic. The resilience of these individuals was related to key place-based factors such as a strong sense of community and useable local assets. The data showcase the role of place-based social determinants in supporting resilience and thereby highlight key preventative measures for public mental health during times of international crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 9(12)2021 Dec 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1896838

ABSTRACT

Older people with dementia are particularly at risk of COVID-19; however, relatively little is known about the indirect impact of the pandemic on the lives of those living with, and/or caring for someone with, dementia. The aim of this study was to investigate the experiences of people with dementia and informal carers during the closure of available social and medical services in Poland during the COVID-19 pandemic. A qualitative thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews with people with dementia (n = 5) and informal carers (n = 21) was performed between June and August 2020 after the first wave of COVID-19 in Poland. Three overarching themes were identified: (1) care re-organization; (2) psychological responses; (3) emerging needs. The factor underlying all these elements was reliance on other people. Social support and engagement are vital to the ongoing health and well-being of people living with dementia and their informal carers. Services need to be strengthened to provide ongoing provision to those living with dementia to reach pre-pandemic levels, if not better. Within the post-pandemic environment, people with dementia and their informal carers need reassurance that they can rely on external institutional and social support able to meet their needs.

4.
J Fam Nurs ; 28(3): 205-218, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1883446

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to explore how formal social support changed after implementation of the COVID-19 public health measures and how these restrictions affected people living with dementia and their informal carers in Australia. Sixteen informal carers and two people living with dementia were interviewed between August and November 2020. Participants were asked about their experiences of the pandemic and the impact that the restrictions had on their lives and care. Thematic analysis identified four overarching themes describing (a) prepandemic limitations of the aged care system, (b) the aged care system's response to the COVID-19 restrictions, (c) changes affecting informal carers, and (d) the challenges faced by people living with dementia. The findings highlighted the challenges faced by the Australian aged care system before the pandemic and the additional burden placed on informal carers who supported people living with dementia across residential and home settings during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Aged , Australia , Caregivers , Humans , Qualitative Research
5.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-336834

ABSTRACT

Introduction Individuals with Long Covid represent a new and growing patient population. In England, fewer than 90 Long Covid clinics deliver assessment and treatment informed by NICE guidelines. However, a paucity of clinical trials or longitudinal cohort studies means that the epidemiology, clinical trajectory, healthcare utilisation and effectiveness of current Long Covid care are poorly documented, and that neither evidence-based treatments nor rehabilitation strategies exist. In addition, and in part due to pre-pandemic health inequalities, access to referral and care varies, and patient experience of the Long Covid care pathways can be poor. In a mixed methods study, we therefore aim to: (1) describe the usual healthcare, outcomes and resource utilisation of individuals with Long Covid;(2) assess the extent of inequalities in access to Long Covid care, and specifically to understand Long Covid patients’ experiences of stigma and discrimination. Methods and analysis A mixed methods study will address our aims. Qualitative data collection from patients and health professionals will be achieved through surveys, interviews and focus group discussions, to understand their experience and document the function of clinics. A patient cohort study will provide an understanding of outcomes and costs of care. Accessible data will be further analysed to understand the nature of Long Covid, and the care received. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was obtained from South Central - Berkshire Research Ethics Committee (reference 303958). The dissemination plan will be decided by the patient and public involvement and engagement (PPIE) group members and study Co-Is, but will target 1) policy makers, and those responsible for commissioning and delivering Long Covid services, 2) patients and the public, and 3) academics.

6.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-334987

ABSTRACT

Importance Multi-organ impairment associated with Long COVID is a significant burden to individuals, populations and health systems, presenting challenges for diagnosis and care provision. Standardised assessment across multiple organs over time is lacking, particularly in non-hospitalised individuals. Objective To determine the prevalence of organ impairment in Long COVID patients at 6 and at 12 months after initial symptoms and to explore links to clinical presentation. Design This was a prospective, longitudinal study in individuals following recovery from acute COVID-19. We assessed symptoms, health status, and multi-organ tissue characterisation and function, using consensus definitions for single and multi-organ impairment. Physiological and biochemical investigations were performed at baseline on all individuals and those with organ impairment were reassessed, including multi-organ MRI, 6 months later. Setting Two non-acute settings (Oxford and London). Participants 536 individuals (mean 45 years, 73% female, 89% white, 32% healthcare workers, 13% acute COVID-19 hospitalisation) completed baseline assessment (median: 6 months post-COVID-19). 331 (62%) with organ impairment or incidental findings had follow up, with reduced symptom burden from baseline (median number of symptoms: 10 and 3, at 6 and 12 months). Exposure SARS-CoV-2 infection 6 months prior to first assessment. Main outcome Prevalence of single and multi-organ impairment at 6 and 12 months post-COVID-19. Results Extreme breathlessness (36% and 30%), cognitive dysfunction (50% and 38%) and poor health-related quality of life (EQ-5D-5L<0.7;55% and 45%) were common at 6 and 12 months, and associated with female gender, younger age and single organ impairment. At baseline, there was fibro-inflammation in the heart (9%), pancreas (9%), kidney (15%) and liver (11%);increased volume in liver (7%), spleen (8%) and kidney (9%);decreased capacity in lungs (2%);and excessive fat deposition in the liver (25%) and pancreas (15%). Single and multi-organ impairment were present in 59% and 23% at baseline, persisting in 59% and 27% at follow-up. Conclusion and Relevance Organ impairment was present in 59% of individuals at 6 months post-COVID-19, persisting in 59% of those followed up at 1 year, with implications for symptoms, quality of life and longer-term health, signalling need for prevention and integrated care of Long COVID. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04369807 Key points Question: What is the prevalence of organ impairment in Long COVID at 6- and 12-months post-COVID-19? Findings: In a prospective study of 536 mainly non-hospitalised individuals, symptom burden decreased, but single organ impairment persisted in 59% at 12 months post-COVID-19. Meaning: Organ impairment in Long COVID has implications for symptoms, quality of life and longer-term health, signalling need for prevention and integrated care of Long COVID.

7.
BMJ Open ; 11(1): e045889, 2021 01 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1832434

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a major impact on delivery of social support services. This might be expected to particularly affect older adults and people living with dementia (PLWD), and to reduce their well-being. AIMS: To explore how social support service use by older adults, carers and PLWD, and their mental well-being changed over the first 3 months since the pandemic outbreak. METHODS: Unpaid dementia carers, PLWD and older adults took part in a longitudinal online or telephone survey collected between April and May 2020, and at two subsequent timepoints 6 and 12 weeks after baseline. Participants were asked about their social support service usage in a typical week prior to the pandemic (at baseline), and in the past week at each of the three timepoints. They also completed measures of levels of depression, anxiety and mental well-being. RESULTS: 377 participants had complete data at all three timepoints. Social support service usage dropped shortly after lockdown measures were imposed at timepoint 1 (T1), to then increase again by T3. The access to paid care was least affected by COVID-19. Cases of anxiety dropped significantly across the study period, while cases of depression rose. Well-being increased significantly for older adults and PLWD from T1 to T3. CONCLUSIONS: Access to social support services has been significantly affected by the pandemic, which is starting to recover slowly. With mental well-being differently affected across groups, support needs to be put in place to maintain better well-being across those vulnerable groups during the ongoing pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Caregivers/psychology , Dementia/psychology , Health Facility Closure , Social Work , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Social Support , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Young Adult
8.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-333110

ABSTRACT

Introduction As mortality rates from COVID-19 disease fall, the high prevalence of long-term sequelae (Long COVID) is becoming increasingly widespread, challenging healthcare systems globally. Traditional pathways of care for Long Term Conditions (LTCs) have tended to be managed by disease-specific specialties, an approach that has been ineffective in delivering care for patients with multi-morbidity. The multi-system nature of Long COVID and its impact on physical and psychological health demands a more effective model of holistic, integrated care. The evolution of integrated care systems (ICSs) in the UK presents an important opportunity to explore areas of mutual benefit to LTC, multi-morbidity and Long COVID care. There may be benefits in comparing and contrasting ICPs for Long COVID with ICPs for other LTCs. Methods and analysis This study aims to evaluate health services requirements for ICPs for Long COVID and their applicability to other LTCs including multi-morbidity and the overlap with medically not yet explained symptoms (MNYES). The study will follow a Delphi design and involve an expert panel of stakeholders including people with lived experience, as well as clinicians with expertise in Long COVID and other LTCs. Study processes will include expert panel and moderator panel meetings, surveys, and interviews. The Delphi process is part of the overall STIMULATE-ICP programme, aimed at improving integrated care for people with Long COVID. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval for this Delphi study has been obtained (Research Governance Board of the University of York) as have approvals for the other STIMULATE-ICP studies. Study outcomes are likely to inform policy for ICPs across LTCs. Results will be disseminated through scientific publication, conference presentation and communications with patients and stakeholders involved in care of other LTCs and Long COVID. Registration Researchregistry: https://www.researchregistry.com/browse-the-registry#home/registrationdetails/6246bfeeeaaed6001f08dadc/ . Strengths and limitations of this study Gap There is no general model for providing ICPs to many LTCs, especially in case of multi-morbidity or MNYES. Solution We will develop policy recommendations for such ICPs based upon a Delphi process exploring the value and interchangeability of elements of ICPs for Long COVID. This will help patients and clinicians navigate access to, or provide ICPs for, LTCs. Strengths A key tenet is that people with lived experience of Long COVID or an LTC will be involved from inception in the design and conduct of the study. Weaknesses Possible under-representation of digitally hard to reach groups, although efforts will be made to ensure that data collection is widely inclusive, following the NIHR INCLUDE framework.

9.
Aging Ment Health ; : 1-9, 2022 Mar 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764375

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic and public health measures caused serious consequences for several population cohorts, including people with dementia in care homes and their families. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of COVID-19 on care home residents with dementia as experienced by family carers in Italy. Specifically, strategies implemented to overcome the pandemic's constraints, their influence upon care, and consequences for everyday life of residents with dementia and carers were investigated. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews explored participants' experiences of the pandemic, its restrictions and the services' status during lockdown. Transcripts were analysed via thematic analysis. RESULTS: 26 family carers were interviewed. Three themes emerged: (1) COVID-19 restrictions negatively affected both residents with dementia and family carers, (2) Changing policies in care homes during COVID-19, and (3) Technology use in care homes during COVID-19. COVID-19 restrictions severely affected care home residents with dementia, disrupted their daily living, and accelerated their cognitive decline. Consequently carers' emotional burdens increased. Care home response strategies (safe visiting and digital solutions) were critical, though they were not enough to compensate for the lack of close in-person contacts. CONCLUSIONS: Mixed evidence emerged about the feasibility of care home strategies and their associated benefits. To meet arising needs and possible future pandemic waves, there is a need for updated health strategies. These should prioritise a continuity of therapeutic activities and minimize negative effects on residents' quality of life, whilst incorporating feasible and accessible digital solutions to provide remote communication and psychological support for family carers.

10.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-330847

ABSTRACT

Background and aim Despite the significant mental health challenges the COVID-19 pandemic and its associated government measures have presented, research have shown that the majority of people have adapted and coped well. The aim of this study was i) to determine the proportion of people with mental stability and volatility during the pandemic in a North West urban environment sample and ii) to establish group differences in psychosocial variables. Mental stability and volatility refer to the extent to which individuals reported change in levels of common mental health symptoms over the course of 12 weeks. Method a two-wave-online survey (N = 163) was used to explore the psychological and social impact of the pandemic on relatively disadvantaged neighbourhoods within the Liverpool City Region over 12 weeks. Kruskal-Wallis with post-hoc tests were used to determine how people with mental stability and volatility differed on factors categorised within an ecological framework of resilience (individual, community, societal, and COVID-19 specific). Results Individuals categorised as ‘stable’ in terms of mental health symptoms (63.6%) had better mental and physical health;were more tolerant of uncertainty;reported higher levels of resilience and wellbeing compared to ‘very volatile’ people (19.8%). These individuals also reported feeling less socially isolated, experienced a greater sense of belonging to their community which was more likely to fulfil their needs, and were more likely to have access to green space nearby for their recommended daily exercise. ‘Stable’ individuals did not report worrying any more during the pandemic than usual and tolerated uncertainty better compared to those in the ‘volatile’ group. Implications The majority of participants in this sample were mentally stable and coping well with the challenges presented by the pandemic. The resilience of these individuals was related to key place-based factors such as a strong sense of community and useable local assets. The data showcase the role of place-based social determinants in supporting resilience and thereby highlight key preventative measures for public mental health during times of international crisis.

11.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-330112

ABSTRACT

The influence of place-based factors on the physical and mental health of residents is well established and acknowledged within the population health approach to addressing health and wellbeing inequalities. The COVID-19 pandemic brought to the fore the issues that global communities face. The current UK policy context of ‘levelling up’ represents these concerns and the need to address them. This research examines perceptions of community wellbeing and its determinants as collected within a city region of the North West Coast of England during COVID restrictions between June and August 2020. The paper aims to establish the structure, construct validity and reliability of a new measure of community wellbeing - the Wellbeing in Place Perceptions Scale. Further, it aims to examine how this measure of community wellbeing correlated with symptoms of common mental health as reported by residents of this relatively disadvantaged city region during this unprecedented time. Results indicate that the WIPPS has a reliable and valid structure, correlating significantly with another widely used measure of sense of community and with the Index of Multiple Deprivation. Its relationship to self-reported common mental distress is also clear. Though in need of replication and longitudinal testing, the findings reported here on this new measure remind us that individual and place-based factors combine to influence wellbeing and that community needs to have an increasingly influential role to sustainably prevent future mental health challenges.

12.
Health Soc Care Community ; 2022 Feb 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707849

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly limited access to health and social care support systems for people with dementia and their carers, compounding the severe social restrictions. The aim of this study was to investigate the experiences of COVID-19 among community-dwelling people with dementia and their informal carers in Italy. Specifically, we focused on access to community-based services and adopted solutions to provide support and care during exceptional times. Informal carers, caring for someone with dementia and attending community-based services in Italy, participated in remote semi-structured interviews between October and November 2020. Participants were asked about the effects of social isolation and closure of in-person services on their daily lives as well as the challenges of dementia care. Transcripts were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. 22 informal carers were interviewed. Three themes emerged: (1) Disruptions to people with dementia's lives and health; (2) COVID-19 as an additional stressor for carers; and (3) New ways of caring for people with dementia during COVID-19. Face-to-face social care and social support services were suddenly interrupted and restrictions on social distancing were introduced, thus leading to people with dementia's impaired health and increased behavioural and psychological symptoms. Not only the amount but also the intensity of care increased, with no chance of respite for informal carers. Overall remote activities provided participants with emotional and social benefits, while allowing the continuity of relationships with services staff and users and of care. However, according to carers, a combination of virtual and face-to-face activities could better counterbalance the multiple adverse outcomes of COVID-19. Public health measures should be designed carefully to consider the safety needs and the physical, psychological and social needs of people with dementia. Within a holistic care approach, social care services need to be enabled better to guarantee high-quality care even during pandemic times.

13.
J Adv Nurs ; 78(7): 2191-2202, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706390

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The aim of this study was to explore the impact of the pandemic on the emotional and mental well-being of family carers, care home staff and residents, in light of changing restrictions, increased testing and vaccination rollout in the UK. DESIGN: Longitudinal, qualitative semi-structured interview study. METHODS: Remote semi-structured interviews were conducted with family carers of care home residents with dementia and care home staff from different care homes across the UK. Baseline and follow-up interviews were conducted in October/November 2020 and March 2021, respectively. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis involving members of the public with caring experiences. RESULTS: In all, 42 family carers and care home staff participated at baseline, with 20 family carers and staff followed up. We identified four themes: (1) Developing anger and frustration; (2) Impact on relationships; (3) Stress and burnout; and (4) Behavioural changes, and perceived impact on residents. The mental health of everyone involved, including family carers, care home staff and residents, has been negatively affected, and relationships between family carers and staff have been severely strained. There was a general lack of adequate mental health support, with little relief. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic has had a detrimental impact on the lives of those surrounding care homes-from residents and staff to family carers. Consideration should be given on how to best support the mental health needs of all three groups, by providing adequate easily accessible mental health care for all. This should also focus on rebuilding the relationships between family carers and care home staff. IMPACT: This is the first paper to highlight the effects of the long-lasting and miscommunicated restrictions on residents, carers and care home staff, and highlight the urgent need for continued mental health support.


Subject(s)
Family , Nursing Homes , Burnout, Psychological , Caregivers/psychology , Family/psychology , Guilt , Humans , Mental Health , United Kingdom
14.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 253, 2022 Feb 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1697977

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Older adults in Colombia have seen a number of stressful life events - including the Colombian armed conflict, forced misplacement and recently COVID-19. These events likely have had and are having a substantial impact on people's mental health and well-being, whilst mental health care provision in Colombia is not sufficient and often access is limited and unaffordable. Therefore, the aim of this study is to understand the impact of stressful life events on the mental health of older adults living in Colombia, and co-produce, pilot, and evaluate a community-based mental health intervention in Turbo. METHODS: This 3-year international mixed-methods study comprises of three phases: Phase I will explore the impact of stressful life events on the mental health of older adults living in Colombia, and their mental health needs, via quantitative needs assessments and qualitative interviews and focus groups; Phase II will involve synthesising the findings from Phase I as well as conducting a systematic review and qualitative interviews with experts into implementing mental health interventions in LMICs to co-produce a community-based mental health intervention with older adults and local community group leaders and care providers; Phase III will involve the piloting and evaluation of the mental health intervention via quantitative and qualitative assessments. Co-production and public involvement underpin each element of this project. DISCUSSION: Appropriate mental health care is as important as physical health care, but this study also looks at how we might integrate these findings into community-level public health initiatives for application both within Colombia and more widely in both LMICs and more developed countries. This study protocol will act as a guide for the development and adaptation of psychosocial mental health interventions in different cultures and contexts.


Subject(s)
Health Services Needs and Demand , Mental Health Services , Mental Health , Stress, Psychological , Aged , Armed Conflicts/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Colombia/epidemiology , Focus Groups , Humans , Systematic Reviews as Topic
15.
BMC Geriatr ; 22(1): 129, 2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690962

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pandemic has significantly affected care homes' residents and families through the national visiting restrictions. However, less is known on the impact these changes have had on the care home workforce. The aim of this research was to explore the impact of COVID-19 on the working practices of care home staff, caring for people living with dementia. METHODS: Remote qualitative, semi-structured interviews were conducted with care home staff caring for people living with dementia (PLWD) in the UK. RESULTS: Participants were recruited to the larger programme of research via convenience sampling. Interviews were conducted via telephone or online platforms. This research employed inductive thematic analysis. Sixteen care home staff were included in this study. Three overarching themes were developed from the analysis that conveyed changes to the everyday working practices of the care home workforce and the impact such changes posed to staff wellbeing: (1) Practical implications of working in a care home during the COVID-19 pandemic; (2); Staff values and changes to the staff roles (3): Impact to the care home staff and concerns for the care sector. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly disrupted the daily working practices of care home staff, with staff forced to adopt additional roles on top of increased workloads to compensate for the loss of external agencies and support. Support and guidance must be offered urgently to inform care home staff on how to best adapt to their new working practices, ensuring that they are adequately trained.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
16.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-316075

ABSTRACT

Background: Older people with dementia are particularly at risk of COVID-19, whilst still little is known about the indirect impact of the Pandemic on the lives of those living with and caring for someone with dementia. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the Pandemic on the lives of people with dementia and their informal carers in the context of using social and medical services in Poland. Methods: A qualitative thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews with people with dementia (n = 5) and informal carers (n = 21) was performed. Interviews were collected between June and August 2020 via phone after the first wave of COVID-19 in Poland. Data were analysed using NVivo software by four team members. Results: Three overarching themes emerged: (1) Care re-organization;(2) Psychological responses;(3) Emerging needs. The factor underlying all these elements were a reliance on other people. Regardless of the type of support (informal or formal), a sense of presence of others and maintaining mutual contacts displayed as crucial elements influencing the well-being of people with dementia and informal carers. Conclusions: Social support and engagement are vital to the ongoing health and wellbeing of people living with dementia and their informal carers. Services need sustaining to provide ongoing provision to those living with dementia to reach pre-pandemic levels, if not better. Within the post-pandemic environment people with dementia and their informal carers need reassurance that they can rely on external institutional and social support able to meet their need.

17.
BMC Geriatr ; 22(1): 116, 2022 02 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1677487

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence shows an impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on people living with dementia and informal carers, without any evidence-based global comparison to date. The aim of this international study was to explore and compare the perceived impact of COVID-19 and associated public health restrictions on the lives of people living with dementia and informal carers and access to dementia care across five countries. METHODS: Informal carers and people living with dementia who were residing in the community in the UK, Australia, Italy, India, and Poland were interviewed remotely between April and December 2020. Participants were asked about their experiences of the pandemic and how restrictions have impacted on their lives and care. Transcripts were analysed by researchers in each country using inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: Fifteen people living with dementia and 111 informal carers participated across the five countries. Four themes emerged: (1) Limited access and support; (2) Technology and issues accessing remote support; (3) Emotional impact; and (4) Decline of cognitive and physical health reported by carers. Whilst variations were noted, the pandemic has indirectly affected people with dementia and carers across all five countries. The pandemic removed access to social support services and thus increased carer burden. Remote services were not always provided and were very limited in benefit and usability for those with dementia. As a result, carers appeared to notice reduced cognitive and physical health in people with dementia. Particular differences were noted between India and Poland vs. the UK, Italy, and Australia, with less impact on care provision in the former due to limited uptake of support services pre-pandemic based on cultural settings. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic has amplified dementia as a global public health problem, and people affected by the condition need support to better access vital support services to live well.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Caregivers , Dementia/diagnosis , Dementia/epidemiology , Dementia/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Int Psychogeriatr ; : 1-10, 2022 Jan 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1632653

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore and compare the experiences of care home visits during the pandemic in the UK and the Netherlands. DESIGN: Qualitative semi-structured interview studies. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Family carers of relatives residing in care homes in the UK and the Netherlands were interviewed remotely. METHODS: Family carers were asked about their experiences of care home visits during the pandemic, and specifically in the Netherlands after care homes had reopened. Transcripts were analyzed in each country separately in the native language using thematic analysis, before discussing findings at multiple analysis meetings. RESULTS: Across 125 interviews, we developed four themes: (1) different types of contact during lockdown; (2) deterioration of resident health and well-being; (3) emotional distress of both visitors and residents; and (4) compliance to guidelines and regulations. Visiting in both the UK and the Netherlands was beneficial, if possible in the UK, yet was characterized by alternative forms of face-to-face visits which was emotionally distressing for many family carers and residents. In the Netherlands, government guidance did enable early care home visitation, while the UK was lacking any guidance leading to care homes implementing restrictions differently. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Early and clear guidance, as well as communication, is required in future pandemics, and in this ongoing pandemic, to enable care home visits between residents and loved ones. It is important to take learnings from this global pandemic to reimagine long-term care, highlighting the value of socializing for care home residents.

19.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-294794

ABSTRACT

Background: Emerging evidence shows an impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on people living with dementia and informal carers, without any evidence-based global comparison to date. The aim of this international study was to explore and compare the perceived impact of COVID-19 and associated public health restrictions on the lives of people living with dementia and informal carers and access to dementia care across five countries. Methods Informal carers and people living with dementia who were residing in the community in the UK, Australia, Italy, India, and Poland were interviewed remotely between April and December 2020. Participants were asked about their experiences of the pandemic and how restrictions have impacted on their lives and care. Transcripts were analysed by researchers in each country using inductive thematic analysis. Results Fifteen people living with dementia and 111 informal carers participated across the five countries. Four themes emerged: (1) Limited access and support;(2) Technology and issues accessing remote support;(3) Emotional impact;and (4) Decline of cognitive and physical health reported by carers. Whilst variations were noted, the pandemic has indirectly affected people with dementia and carers across all five countries. The pandemic removed access to social support services and thus increased carer burden. Remote services were not always provided and were very limited in benefit and usability for those with dementia. As a result, carers appeared to notice reduced cognitive and physical health in people with dementia. Particular differences were noted between India and Poland vs. the UK, Italy, and Australia, with less impact on care provision in the former due to limited uptake of support services pre-pandemic based on cultural settings. Conclusions The pandemic has amplified dementia as a global public health problem, and people affected by the condition need support to better access vital support services to live well.

20.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-293296

ABSTRACT

Background: Emerging evidence shows an impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on people living with dementia and informal carers, without any evidence-based global comparison to date. The aim of this international study was to explore and compare the perceived impact of COVID-19 and associated public health restrictions on the lives of people living with dementia and informal carers and access to dementia care across five countries. Methods Informal carers and people living with dementia who were residing in the community in the UK, Australia, Italy, India, and Poland were interviewed remotely between April and December 2020. Participants were asked about their experiences of the pandemic and how restrictions have impacted on their lives and care. Transcripts were analysed by researchers in each country using inductive thematic analysis. Results Fifteen people living with dementia and 111 informal carers participated across the five countries. Four themes emerged: (1) Limited access and support;(2) Technology and issues accessing remote support;(3) Emotional impact;and (4) Decline of cognitive and physical health reported by carers. Whilst variations were noted, the pandemic has indirectly affected people with dementia and carers across all five countries. The pandemic removed access to social support services and thus increased carer burden. Remote services were not always provided and were very limited in benefit and usability for those with dementia. As a result, carers appeared to notice reduced cognitive and physical health in people with dementia. Particular differences were noted between India and Poland vs. the UK, Italy, and Australia, with less impact on care provision in the former due to limited uptake of support services pre-pandemic based on cultural settings. Conclusions The pandemic has amplified dementia as a global public health problem, and people affected by the condition need support to better access vital support services to live well.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL