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1.
Curr Opin Anaesthesiol ; 34(4): 464-469, 2021 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313887

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Nonoperating room anesthesia (NORA) continues to increase in popularity and scope. This article reviews current and new trends in NORA, trends in anesthesia management in nonoperating room settings, and the evolving debates surrounding these trends. RECENT FINDINGS: National data suggests that NORA cases will continue to rise relative to operating room (OR) anesthesia and there will continue to be a shift towards performing more interventional procedures outside of the OR. These trends have important implications for the safety of interventional procedures as they become increasingly more complex and patients continue to be older and more frail. In order for anesthesia providers and proceduralists to be prepared for this future, rigorous standards must be set for safe anesthetic care outside of the OR.Although the overall association between NORA and patient morbidity and mortality remains unclear, focused studies point toward trends specific to each non-OR procedure type. Given increasing patient and procedure complexity, anesthesiology teams may see a larger role in the interventional suite. However, the ideal setting and placement of anesthesia staff for interventional procedures remain controversial. Also, the impact of COVID-19 on the growth and utilization of non-OR anesthesia remains unclear, and it remains to be seen how the pandemic will influence the delivery of NORA procedures in postpandemic settings. SUMMARY: NORA is a rapidly growing field of anesthesia. Continuing discussions of complication rates and mortality in different subspecialty areas will determine the need for anesthesia care and quality improvement efforts in each setting. As new noninvasive procedures are developed, new data will continue to shape debates surrounding anesthesia care outside of the operating room.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Anesthesiology , Anesthetics , COVID-19 , Anesthesia/adverse effects , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Best Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol ; 35(3): 461-475, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1103745

ABSTRACT

In 2019, a novel coronavirus called the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 led to the outbreak of the coronavirus disease 2019, which was deemed a pandemic by the World Health Organization in March 2020. Owing to the accelerated rate of mortality and utilization of hospital resources, health care systems had to adapt to these major changes. This affected patient care across all disciplines and specifically within the perioperative services. In this review, we discuss the strategies and pitfalls of how perioperative services in a large academic medical center responded to the initial onset of a pandemic, adjustments made to airway management and anesthesia specialty services - including critical care medicine, obstetric anesthesiology, and cardiac anesthesiology - and strategies for reopening surgical caseload during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Airway Management/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Decision-Making , Critical Care/standards , Patient Care/standards , Airway Management/methods , Clinical Decision-Making/methods , Critical Care/methods , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Care/methods
5.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 14(6): 756-758, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-603505

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has infected over 1.5 million individuals and led to over 91, 000 deaths in the United States (US) alone as of May 20th, 2020. Minority populations, however, continue to be a high-risk population to contract the SARS-CoV-2 infection. While socioeconomic inequality may help to explain why minority ethnic populations are contracting the SARS-CoV-2 in larger proportions, the reason for elevated mortality rates in African Americans is still unknown. African Americans are less likely than whites to utilize high-quality hospitals, ambulatory care services, and regular primary care providers; this is most likely a result of barriers to accessing high quality treatment, as African Americans have substantially higher uninsured rates. However, previous reports have shown that regardless of insurance status, African Americans are more likely to be directed toward lower quality treatment plans compared to their white counterparts, and that physicians carry implicit biases that negatively impact treatment regimens for these minority populations. While income, education, and access to healthcare should be revised in due time, in the short term physicians should do everything possible to learn about implicit biases that may exist in healthcare, as the first step to minimize implicit biases is to recognize that they exist.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , African Americans , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Quality of Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , United States
7.
Best Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol ; 34(2): 345-351, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-325827

ABSTRACT

Limiting the spread of the disease is key to controlling the COVID-19 pandemic. This includes identifying people who have been exposed to COVID-19, minimizing patient contact, and enforcing strict hygiene measures. To prevent healthcare systems from becoming overburdened, elective and non-urgent medical procedures and treatments have been postponed, and primary health care has broadened to include virtual appointments via telemedicine. Although telemedicine precludes the physical examination of a patient, it allows collection of a range of information prior to a patient's admission, and may therefore be used in preoperative assessment. This new tool can be used to evaluate the severity and progression of the main disease, other comorbidities, and the urgency of the surgical treatment as well as preferencing anesthetic procedures. It can also be used for effective screening and triaging of patients with suspected or established COVID-19, thereby protecting other patients, clinicians and communities alike.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Preoperative Care/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Anesthesia , COVID-19 , Humans
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