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1.
Respir Care ; 2022 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879560

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The use of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) and noninvasive ventilation (NIV) for hypoxemic respiratory failure secondary to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are recommended by critical-care guidelines; however, apprehension about viral particle aerosolization and patient self-inflicted lung injury may have limited use. We aimed to describe hospital variation in the use and clinical outcomes of HFNC and NIV for the management of COVID-19. METHODS: This was a retrospective observational study of adults hospitalized with COVID-19 who received supplemental oxygen between February 15, 2020, and April 12, 2021, across 102 international and United States hospitals by using the COVID-19 Registry. Associations of HFNC and NIV use with clinical outcomes were evaluated by using multivariable adjusted hierarchical random-effects logistic regression models. Hospital variation was characterized by using intraclass correlation and the median odds ratio. RESULTS: Among 13,454 adults with COVID-19 who received supplemental oxygen, 8,143 (60%) received nasal cannula/face mask only, 2,859 (21%) received HFNC, 878 (7%) received NIV, 1,574 (12%) received both HFNC and NIV, with 3,640 subjects (27%) progressing to invasive ventilation. The hospital of admission contributed to 24% of the risk-adjusted variation in HFNC and 30% of the risk-adjusted variation in NIV. The median odds ratio for hospital variation of HFNC was 2.6 (95% CI 1.4-4.9) and of NIV was 3.1 (95% CI 1.2-8.1). Among 5,311 subjects who received HFNC and/or NIV, 2,772 (52%) did not receive invasive ventilation and survived to hospital discharge. Hospital-level use of HFNC or NIV were not associated with the rates of invasive ventilation or mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Hospital variation in the use of HFNC and NIV for acute respiratory failure secondary to COVID-19 was great but was not associated with intubation or mortality. The wide variation and relatively low use of HFNC/NIV observed within our study signaled that implementation of increased HFNC/NIV use in patients with COVID-19 will require changes to current care delivery practices. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT04323787.).

2.
Pharmacotherapy ; 2022 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1877674

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Suggested therapeutic options for Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) include intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) and steroids. Prior studies have shown the benefit of combination therapy with both agents on fever control or the resolution of organ dysfunction. The primary objective of this study was to analyze the impact of IVIG and steroids on hospital and ICU length of stay (LOS) in patients with MIS-C associated with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospective study on 356 hospitalized patients with MIS-C from March 2020 to September 2021 (28 sites in the United States) in the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) Discovery Viral Infection and Respiratory Illness Universal Study (VIRUS) COVID-19 Registry. The effect of IVIG and steroids initiated in the first 2 days of admission, alone or in combination, on LOS was analyzed. Adjustment for confounders was made by multivariable mixed regression with a random intercept for the site. RESULTS: Median age of the study population was 8.8 (Interquartile range (IQR) 4.0, 13) years. 247/356 (69%) patients required intensive care unit (ICU) admission during hospitalization. Overall hospital mortality was 2% (7/356). Of the total patients, 153 (43%) received IVIG and steroids, 33 (9%) received IVIG only, 43 (12%) received steroids only, and 127 (36%) received neither within 2 days of admission. After adjustment of confounders, only combination therapy showed a significant decrease of ICU LOS by 1.6 days compared to no therapy (exponentiated coefficient 0.71 [95% confidence interval 0.51, 0.97, p=0.03]). No significant difference was observed in hospital LOS or the secondary outcome variable of the normalization of inflammatory mediators by Day 3. CONCLUSIONS: Combination therapy with IVIG and steroids initiated in the first 2 days of admission favorably impacts ICU but not the overall hospital LOS in children with MIS-C.

3.
Trials ; 23(1): 406, 2022 May 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846862

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Administration of sedative and opioid medications to patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support in the intensive care unit is a common clinical practice. METHODS: A two-site randomized open-label clinical trial will test the efficacy of self-management of sedative therapy with dexmedetomidine compared to usual care on anxiety, delirium, and duration of ventilatory support after randomization. Secondary objectives are to compare self-management of sedative therapy to usual care on level of alertness, total aggregate sedative and opioid medication exposure, and ventilator-free days up to day 28 after study enrolment. Exploratory objectives of the study are to compare self-management of sedative therapy to usual care on 3- and 6-month post-discharge physical and functional status, psychological well-being (depression, symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder), health-related quality of life, and recollections of ICU care. ICU patients (n = 190) who are alert enough to follow commands to self-manage sedative therapy are randomly assigned to self-management of sedative therapy or usual care. Patients remain in the ICU sedative medication study phase for up to 7 days as long as mechanically ventilated. DISCUSSION: The care of critically ill mechanically ventilated patients can change significantly over the course of a 5-year clinical trial. Changes in sedation and pain interventions, oxygenation approaches, and standards related to extubation have substantially impacted consistency in the number of eligible patients over time. In addition, the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in mandated extended pauses in trial enrolment as well as alterations in recruitment methods out of concern for study personnel safety and availability of protective equipment. Patient triaging among healthcare institutions due to COVID-19 cases also has resulted in inconsistent access to the eligible study population. This has made it even more imperative for the study team to be flexible and innovative to identify and enrol all eligible participants. Patient-controlled sedation is a novel approach to the management of patient symptoms that may be able to alleviate mechanical ventilation-induced distress without serious side effects. Findings from this study will provide insight into the efficacy of this approach on short- and long-term outcomes in a subset of mechanically ventilated patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02819141. Registered on June 29, 2016.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delirium , Dexmedetomidine , Aftercare , Analgesics, Opioid , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/therapy , Critical Illness , Delirium/diagnosis , Delirium/drug therapy , Delirium/etiology , Dexmedetomidine/adverse effects , Humans , Hypnotics and Sedatives/adverse effects , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Ventilators, Mechanical
4.
Crit Care Explor ; 4(4): e0686, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1816286

ABSTRACT

To describe the prevalence, associated risk factors, and outcomes of serious neurologic manifestations (encephalopathy, stroke, seizure, and meningitis/encephalitis) among patients hospitalized with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: One hundred seventy-nine hospitals in 24 countries within the Society of Critical Care Medicine Discovery Viral Infection and Respiratory Illness Universal Study COVID-19 Registry. PATIENTS: Hospitalized adults with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. INTERVENTIONS: None. RESULTS: Of 16,225 patients enrolled in the registry with hospital discharge status available, 2,092 (12.9%) developed serious neurologic manifestations including 1,656 (10.2%) with encephalopathy at admission, 331 (2.0%) with stroke, 243 (1.5%) with seizure, and 73 (0.5%) with meningitis/encephalitis at admission or during hospitalization. Patients with serious neurologic manifestations of COVID-19 were older with median (interquartile range) age 72 years (61.0-81.0 yr) versus 61 years (48.0-72.0 yr) and had higher prevalence of chronic medical conditions, including vascular risk factors. Adjusting for age, sex, and time since the onset of the pandemic, serious neurologic manifestations were associated with more severe disease (odds ratio [OR], 1.49; p < 0.001) as defined by the World Health Organization ordinal disease severity scale for COVID-19 infection. Patients with neurologic manifestations were more likely to be admitted to the ICU (OR, 1.45; p < 0.001) and require critical care interventions (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: OR, 1.78; p = 0.009 and renal replacement therapy: OR, 1.99; p < 0.001). Hospital, ICU, and 28-day mortality for patients with neurologic manifestations was higher (OR, 1.51, 1.37, and 1.58; p < 0.001), and patients had fewer ICU-free, hospital-free, and ventilator-free days (estimated difference in days, -0.84, -1.34, and -0.84; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Encephalopathy at admission is common in hospitalized patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection and is associated with worse outcomes. While serious neurologic manifestations including stroke, seizure, and meningitis/encephalitis were less common, all were associated with increased ICU support utilization, more severe disease, and worse outcomes.

5.
Simul Healthc ; 2022 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1794973

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY STATEMENT: The Checklist for Early Recognition and Treatment of Acute Illness and iNjury program is a well-established, interactive, and simulation-based program designed to improve the quality of care delivered in intensive care units. The COVID-19 pandemic created an overwhelming surge of critically ill patients worldwide, and infection control concerns limited healthcare providers' access to in-person and hands-on simulation training when they needed it the most. Virtual simulation offers an alternative to in-person training but is often complex and expensive. We describe our successful development and initial implementation of an inexpensive, simulation-based virtual Checklist for Early Recognition and Treatment of Acute Illness and iNjury program to address the pressing need for effective critical care training in various resource-limited settings both within and outside of the United States. The overall satisfaction rate ("excellent" or "very good" responses) was 94.4% after the virtual simulation workshop. Our initial experience suggests that virtual interactions can be engaging and build strong relationships, like in-person continuing professional education, even using relatively simple technology. This knowledge-to-practice improvement platform can be readily adapted to other disciplines beyond critical care medicine.

6.
World J Crit Care Med ; 11(2): 102-111, 2022 Mar 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1791995

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) course may be affected by environmental factors. Ecological studies previously suggested a link between climatological factors and COVID-19 fatality rates. However, individual-level impact of these factors has not been thoroughly evaluated yet. AIM: To study the association of climatological factors related to patient location with unfavorable outcomes in patients. METHODS: In this observational analysis of the Society of Critical Care Medicine Discovery Viral Infection and Respiratory Illness Universal Study: COVID-19 Registry cohort, the latitudes and altitudes of hospitals were examined as a covariate for mortality within 28 d of admission and the length of hospital stay. Adjusting for baseline parameters and admission date, multivariable regression modeling was utilized. Generalized estimating equations were used to fit the models. RESULTS: Twenty-two thousand one hundred eight patients from over 20 countries were evaluated. The median age was 62 (interquartile range: 49-74) years, and 54% of the included patients were males. The median age increased with increasing latitude as well as the frequency of comorbidities. Contrarily, the percentage of comorbidities was lower in elevated altitudes. Mortality within 28 d of hospital admission was found to be 25%. The median hospital-free days among all included patients was 20 d. Despite the significant linear relationship between mortality and hospital-free days (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.39 (1.04, 1.86), P = 0.025 for mortality within 28 d of admission; aOR = -1.47 (-2.60, -0.33), P = 0.011 for hospital-free days), suggesting that adverse patient outcomes were more common in locations further away from the Equator; the results were no longer significant when adjusted for baseline differences (aOR = 1.32 (1.00, 1.74), P = 0.051 for 28-day mortality; aOR = -1.07 (-2.13, -0.01), P = 0.050 for hospital-free days). When we looked at the altitude's effect, we discovered that it demonstrated a non-linear association with mortality within 28 d of hospital admission (aOR = 0.96 (0.62, 1.47), 1.04 (0.92, 1.19), 0.49 (0.22, 0.90), and 0.51 (0.27, 0.98), for the altitude points of 75 MASL, 125 MASL, 400 MASL, and 600 MASL, in comparison to the reference altitude of 148 m.a.s.l, respectively. P = 0.001). We detected an association between latitude and 28-day mortality as well as hospital-free days in this worldwide study. When the baseline features were taken into account, however, this did not stay significant. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that differences observed in previous epidemiological studies may be due to ecological fallacy rather than implying a causal relationship at the patient level.

7.
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) ; 2022 Feb 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1708522

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Primary hypothyroidism is a common comorbid condition, but little is known about its association with COVID-19 severity and outcomes. This study aims to identify the frequency of hypothyroidism in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 as well as describe the differences in outcomes between patients with and without pre-existing hypothyroidism using an observational, multinational registry. METHODS: In an observational cohort study we enrolled patients 18 years or older, with laboratory-confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 infection between March 2020 and February 2021. The primary outcomes were (1) the disease severity defined as per the World Health Organization Scale for Clinical Improvement, which is an ordinal outcome corresponding with the highest severity level recorded during a patient's index COVID-19 hospitalization, (2) in-hospital mortality and (3) hospital-free days. Secondary outcomes were the rate of intensive care unit (ICU) admission and ICU mortality. RESULTS: Among the 20,366 adult patients included in the study, pre-existing hypothyroidism was identified in 1616 (7.9%). The median age for the Hypothyroidism group was 70 (interquartile range: 59-80) years, and 65% were female and 67% were White. The most common comorbidities were hypertension (68%), diabetes (42%), dyslipidemia (37%) and obesity (28%). After adjusting for age, body mass index, sex, admission date in the quarter year since March 2020, race, smoking history and other comorbid conditions (coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia), pre-existing hypothyroidism was not associated with higher odds of severe disease using the World Health Organization disease severity index (odds ratio [OR]: 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.92, 1.13; p = .69), in-hospital mortality (OR: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.92, 1.15; p = .58) or differences in hospital-free days (estimated difference 0.01 days; 95% CI: -0.45, 0.47; p = .97). Pre-existing hypothyroidism was not associated with ICU admission or ICU mortality in unadjusted as well as in adjusted analysis. CONCLUSIONS: In an international registry, hypothyroidism was identified in around 1 of every 12 adult hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Pre-existing hypothyroidism in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 was not associated with higher disease severity or increased risk of mortality or ICU admissions. However, more research on the possible effects of COVID-19 on the thyroid gland and its function is needed in the future.

9.
Critical care explorations ; 10(2), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1695890

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe hospital variation in use of “guideline-based care” for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) due to COVID-19. DESIGN: Retrospective, observational study. SETTING: The Society of Critical Care Medicine’s Discovery Viral Infection and RESPIRATORY ILLNESS UNIVERSAL STUDY COVID-19 REGISTRY. PATIENTS: Adult patients with ARDS due to COVID-19 between February 15, 2020, and April 12, 2021. INTERVENTIONS: Hospital-level use of “guideline-based care” for ARDS including low-tidal-volume ventilation, plateau pressure less than 30 cm H2O, and prone ventilation for a Pao2/Fio2 ratio less than 100. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Among 1,495 adults with COVID-19 ARDS receiving care across 42 hospitals, 50.4% ever received care consistent with ARDS clinical practice guidelines. After adjusting for patient demographics and severity of illness, hospital characteristics, and pandemic timing, hospital of admission contributed to 14% of the risk-adjusted variation in “guideline-based care.” A patient treated at a randomly selected hospital with higher use of guideline-based care had a median odds ratio of 2.0 (95% CI, 1.1–3.4) for receipt of “guideline-based care” compared with a patient receiving treatment at a randomly selected hospital with low use of recommended therapies. Median-adjusted inhospital mortality was 53% (interquartile range, 47–62%), with a nonsignificantly decreased risk of mortality for patients admitted to hospitals in the highest use “guideline-based care” quartile (49%) compared with the lowest use quartile (60%) (odds ratio, 0.7;95% CI, 0.3–1.9;p = 0.49). CONCLUSIONS: During the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, only half of patients received “guideline-based care” for ARDS management, with wide practice variation across hospitals. Strategies that improve adherence to recommended ARDS management strategies are needed.

10.
BMC Nephrol ; 23(1): 63, 2022 02 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690946

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hospitalized patients with SARS-CoV2 develop acute kidney injury (AKI) frequently, yet gaps remain in understanding why adults seem to have higher rates compared to children. Our objectives were to evaluate the epidemiology of SARS-CoV2-related AKI across the age spectrum and determine if known risk factors such as illness severity contribute to its pattern. METHODS: Secondary analysis of ongoing prospective international cohort registry. AKI was defined by KDIGO-creatinine only criteria. Log-linear, logistic and generalized estimating equations assessed odds ratios (OR), risk differences (RD), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for AKI and mortality adjusting for sex, pre-existing comorbidities, race/ethnicity, illness severity, and clustering within centers. Sensitivity analyses assessed different baseline creatinine estimators. RESULTS: Overall, among 6874 hospitalized patients, 39.6% (n = 2719) developed AKI. There was a bimodal distribution of AKI by age with peaks in older age (≥60 years) and middle childhood (5-15 years), which persisted despite controlling for illness severity, pre-existing comorbidities, or different baseline creatinine estimators. For example, the adjusted OR of developing AKI among hospitalized patients with SARS-CoV2 was 2.74 (95% CI 1.66-4.56) for 10-15-year-olds compared to 30-35-year-olds and similarly was 2.31 (95% CI 1.71-3.12) for 70-75-year-olds, while adjusted OR dropped to 1.39 (95% CI 0.97-2.00) for 40-45-year-olds compared to 30-35-year-olds. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV2-related AKI is common with a bimodal age distribution that is not fully explained by known risk factors or confounders. As the pandemic turns to disproportionately impacting younger individuals, this deserves further investigation as the presence of AKI and SARS-CoV2 infection increases hospital mortality risk.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Distribution , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Confidence Intervals , Creatinine/blood , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Registries/statistics & numerical data , Severity of Illness Index
11.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-322271

ABSTRACT

Background: CERTAIN (Checklist for Early Recognition and Treatment of Acute Illness and iNjury) has been shown to improve critical care process and patient outcomes in international ICUs with variable resources. Methods CERTAIN education program derived from this approach is designed, promoted, and implemented following the Logic model. Through the roadmap of the Logic model, we presented a dynamic, longitudinal implementation framework that had sufficient rigor yet offers flexibility to reach the need of the existing and emerging diversified medical education projects. Results Using the Logic model, the delivery of the CERTAIN education program is optimized to deliver relevant education content in various environments. During the COVID-19 outbreak, the implementational framework demonstrated that it could serve as an excellent template for effective response to global pandemics. Conclusions The Logical model is useful as a facilitation tool for planning and evaluating innovative education delivery and dissemination. The CERTAIN program provided an example for other continuous professional education projects.

12.
Crit Care ; 26(1): 9, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606943

ABSTRACT

ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03852537 , Registered February 25, 2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Steroids , Biomarkers , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Pilot Projects , Steroids/administration & dosage , Treatment Outcome
13.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:120-120, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1599538

ABSTRACT

The Structured Team-based Optimal Patient-centered care for COVID-19 VIRUS (STOP-VIRUS) Collaborative was created to identify and implement current best COVID-19 practices using standard quality improvement methodology in a learning community of participating U.S. sites. B Introduction: b Interim SCCM VIRUS Registry analysis demonstrated variation in patient outcomes independent of acuity or comorbidity, suggesting opportunities for critical care process improvement. [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

14.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:55-55, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1598631

ABSTRACT

B Introduction: b The severity of COVID-19 may be affected by environmental factors. While considering the altitude level, we found that it had a non-linear relationship with 28-day mortality (p=0.001, odds ratios for altitudes 75, 125, 400, and 600 m.a.s.l were: 0.96, 1.04, 0.49, and 0.51, respectively). [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

15.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:58-58, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1598630

ABSTRACT

B Introduction: b Better delineation of COVID-19 presentations in different climatological conditions might assist with prompt diagnosis and isolation of patients. When adjusted for baseline differences, at lower latitudes (< 30°) patients presented less commonly with gastrointestinal symptoms (p< 0.001, odds ratios for latitudes 15°, 25°, and 30°: 0.32, 0.81, and 0.98, respectively). [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

16.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:79-79, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1598003

ABSTRACT

B Methods: b This was an observational cohort analysis of adult, hospitalized, patients enrolled in the SCCM Discovery VIRUS Registry. B Conclusions: b Our multivariate analysis from a large multinational registry showed that diarrhea was more common in obese patients than non-obese patients. B Introduction: b While obesity is associated with the severity of COVID-19 disease, it is unclear whether gut mechanisms in patients with obesity predispose to increased susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2. [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

17.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:49-49, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1598002

ABSTRACT

B Introduction: b Gastrointestinal symptoms are common is patients with COVID-19. There were significant differences in baseline demographics, and signs and symptoms and comorbidities at hospital admission between patients with and without gastrointestinal symptoms. Upon hospitalization, patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms (isolated or along with other non-gastrointestinal symptoms), may have a better prognosis than patients with non-gastrointestinal symptoms. [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

18.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:75-75, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1593488

ABSTRACT

B Introduction: b Despite critical care guidelines supporting the use of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) and non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in patients with acute respiratory failure from coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19), concerns surrounding aerosolization of viral particles, and patient self-inflicted lung injury likely influenced use across hospitals. Among 5311 patients who received HFNC and/or NIV, 2772 (52%) did not receive invasive mechanical ventilation and survived to hospital discharge. B Conclusions: b Hospital variation in use of HFNC and NIV for acute respiratory failure secondary to COVID-19 was large, and was not associated with progression to invasive mechanical ventilation or mortality. [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

19.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:12-12, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1593487

ABSTRACT

We sought to evaluate variation in use of "guideline-based care" and adjunctive strategies for COVID-19 ARDS across 55 hospitals contributing to the Society of Critical Care Medicine Viral Infection and Respiratory Illness Universal Study (VIRUS) COVID-19 registry. B Introduction: b Adherence to guideline-recommended ventilator management for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) due to COVID-19 is unknown. We hypothesized that COVID-19 ARDS management would vary across hospitals and that hospital-level mortality would be higher at hospitals with lower use of guideline-recommended care as compared to those with higher use. [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

20.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:83-83, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1593486

ABSTRACT

Repurposed medications, including antivirals, corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine, immunomodulators and therapeutic dose anticoagulants were evaluated using multivariable adjusted random effects logistic regression models and unsupervised clustering. B Results: b Among 7069 adults hospitalized with COVID-19, 1979 (28%) received antivirals, 2876 (41%) received corticosteroids, 1779 (25%) received hydroxychloroquine, 620 (9%) received immunomodulators and 2154 (31%) received therapeutic dose anticoagulants. Contribution of hospital site to risk-adjusted variation was 46% for antivirals, 30% for corticosteroids, 48% for hydroxychloroquine, 46% for immunomodulators, and 19% for therapeutic dose anticoagulants. [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

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