Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 11 de 11
Filter
1.
British Educational Research Journal ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2172677

ABSTRACT

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, the world struggled to address growing educational inequalities and fulfil the commitment to Sustainable Development Goal 4, which seeks to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. The pandemic has exacerbated these inequalities and changed how education functions, moving to online and hybrid methods. The challenges in global education highlighted and worsened by the pandemic make it necessary to re-evaluate education systems and the policies in place to support access, quality and equal opportunity. This article focuses on analysing education policies at a national level. It tests a pilot policy analysis tool, the International Education Index (IEI), developed as a starting point to begin this reconsideration and create an accessible and comprehensive way to evaluate national education systems to inform decision-making and policies in the new context. This research uses Ireland and Northern Ireland to test the IEI pilot tool. The IEI consists of 54 questions across nine indicators, including institutional frameworks, education strategies, digital skills and infrastructure, twenty-first century skills, access to basic social services, adherence to international standards, legal frameworks, data gathering and availability and international partnerships. Countries can score 108 points to be categorised as having developed, emerging or nascent national education systems. Ireland scored 94 and Northern Ireland 81, indicating that they have developed national education systems.

2.
Emerging Infectious Diseases ; 29(1):01, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141586

ABSTRACT

Since June 2020, the SARS-CoV-2 Immunity and Reinfection Evaluation (SIREN) study has conducted routine PCR testing in UK healthcare workers and sequenced PCR-positive samples. SIREN detected increases in infections and reinfections during Omicron subvariant waves contemporaneous with national surveillance. SIREN's sentinel surveillance methods can be used for variant surveillance.

3.
Virus Evolution ; 8(veac080), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2051563

ABSTRACT

The first SARS-CoV-2 variant of concern (VOC) to be designated was lineage B.1.1.7, later labelled by the World Health Organization as Alpha. Originating in early autumn but discovered in December 2020, it spread rapidly and caused large waves of infections worldwide. The Alpha variant is notable for being defined by a long ancestral phylogenetic branch with an increased evolutionary rate, along which only two sequences have been sampled. Alpha genomes comprise a well-supported monophyletic clade within which the evolutionary rate is typical of SARS-CoV-2. The Alpha epidemic continued to grow despite the continued restrictions on social mixing across the UK and the imposition of new restrictions, in particular, the English national lockdown in November 2020. While these interventions succeeded in reducing the absolute number of cases, the impact of these non-pharmaceutical interventions was predominantly to drive the decline of the SARS-CoV-2 lineages that preceded Alpha. We investigate the only two sampled sequences that fall on the branch ancestral to Alpha. We find that one is likely to be a true intermediate sequence, providing information about the order of mutational events that led to Alpha. We explore alternate hypotheses that can explain how Alpha acquired a large number of mutations yet remained largely unobserved in a region of high genomic surveillance: an under-sampled geographical location, a non-human animal population, or a chronically infected individual. We conclude that the latter provides the best explanation of the observed behaviour and dynamics of the variant, although the individual need not be immunocompromised, as persistently infected immunocompetent hosts also display a higher within-host rate of evolution. Finally, we compare the ancestral branches and mutation profiles of other VOCs and find that Delta appears to be an outlier both in terms of the genomic locations of its defining mutations and a lack of the rapid evolutionary rate on its ancestral branch. As new variants, such as Omicron, continue to evolve (potentially through similar mechanisms), it remains important to investigate the origins of other variants to identify ways to potentially disrupt their evolution and emergence.

4.
129th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Excellence Through Diversity, ASEE 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2046709
5.
Innovation in Aging ; 5:139-139, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2011402
8.
Age and ageing ; 50(Suppl 3), 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1601916

ABSTRACT

Background Quarantine, lockdowns and mandatory isolation have slowed the transmission of Covid-19. However, these public health measures have amplified frailty in our vulnerable older person population by increasing social disconnection, reducing exercise and access to early interventions. In response to this increasingly dependent older population we introduced a ‘frailty hub’ in our hospital. This hub allowed early access to a geriatric review as well as a broader multidisciplinary team intervention. Methods We performed a cross sectional review of our new hub which was introduced in our tertiary centre to priortise care of the older person.We analysed attendees from February to June 2021 (20 weeks of data). Results There were 121 new patient reviews and 127 follow up consultations.Commonly requested reason for referral was medical assessment (30%), cognitive assessments (30%) and falls(28%). Referral sources were analysed and included consultant referrals (11% n = 13), GP referrals (55% n = 67), multidisciplinary team referrals (6% n = 7) and emergency department referrals (26% n = 32). The average age of those review was 79 years (range 59 years to 99 years). Of all patients 65% were reviewed by physiotherapist, 45% were seen by an occupational therapist, 10% were seen by a speech and language therapist or dietician. 85% had a medication changes. 95% had a follow up review with either a geriatrician or advanced nurse practitioner. Conclusion Innovation is required to appropriately target our most vulnerable frail adults.The pandemic has had a detrimental effect on some older adult’s function.Our hub is targeting this group and optimising their care.These are our preliminary findings, we plan on doing further analysis.

9.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 39(15 SUPPL), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1339232

ABSTRACT

Background: It is unclear whether patients with cancer experience greater distress as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, we assessed the relationship of the COVID-19 pandemic with quality of life (QOL) and depression symptoms in patients newly diagnosed with advanced lung cancer. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients with advanced lung cancer enrolled in two multisite randomized supportive care trials. We enrolled adult patients within 12 weeks of diagnosis of advanced lung cancer and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) Performance Status from 0 to 3 across 23 institutions in the United States. At the time of enrollment, participants completed the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung (FACT-L), which includes four wellbeing subscales (i.e., physical, social, emotional, and functional) as well as lung cancer symptoms, and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) to assess their QOL and depression symptoms, respectively. We compared QOL and depression symptoms between participants enrolled prior to COVID-19 (i.e., those enrolled in the following time periods: March 2018 to January 2019 and March 2019 to January 2020) and during the COVID-19 pandemic (March 2020 to January 2021). We used linear regression models adjusting for age, race, gender, and time since diagnosis of advanced cancer to examine the relationship between the period of enrollment and patients' QOL and depression symptoms. Results: A total of 860 patients were included in this analysis (665 participants enrolled prior to COVID-19 and 195 participants during COVID-19). The two cohorts did not differ significantly with respect to baseline demographic factors [Mean age 65.4 (SD = 11.4), 51.9% female]. In multivariate regression models, enrollment during COVID-19 was not associated with physical (B = -0.16, SE = 0.52, P = 0.763), social (B = -0.48, SE = 0.39, P = 0.217), emotional (B = -0.16, SE = 0.41, P = 0.693), functional (B = -0.83, SE = 0.55, P = 0.128) wellbeing, or lung cancer symptoms (B = -0.11, SE = 0.44, P = 0.806). Enrollment during COVID-19 was not associated with overall QOL (FACT-L: B = -1.32, SE = 1.69, P = 0.436) or depression symptoms (PHQ-9: B = -0.02, SE = 0.45, P = 0.973). Conclusions: Despite the prevailing belief that COVID-19 has negatively impacted QOL and distress in patients with cancer, we found no differences in QOL or depression symptoms in patients newly diagnosed with advanced lung cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to those diagnosed prior to the pandemic. These findings suggest that factors other than the COVID- 19 pandemic, such as patients' experience with their cancer, contribute to their QOL and depression symptoms.

10.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 7(SUPPL 1):S279, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1185789

ABSTRACT

Background: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends upper respiratory tract (URT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing as the initial diagnostic test for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). Lower respiratory tract (LRT) testing for patients requiring mechanical ventilation is also recommended. The goal of this study was to evaluate concordance between paired URT and LRT specimens in children undergoing pre-admission/procedure screening or diagnostic testing. We hypothesized that < 10% of paired tests would have discordant results. Methods: Single center cross-sectional study including children with artificial airways who had paired URT and LRT SARS-CoV-2 PCR testing between 4/1/2020 and 6/8/2020. URT specimens included nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs and aspirates. LRT specimens included tracheal aspirates and bronchoalveolar lavages. URT and LRT specimens were classified as paired if the two specimens were collected within 24 hours. Artificial airways included tracheostomies and endotracheal tubes. Tests were classified as diagnostic versus screening based on the indication selected in the order. Results: 102 paired specimens were obtained during the study period. Fifty-nine were performed for screening and 43 were performed for diagnosis of suspected SARS-CoV-2. Overall, 94 specimens (92%) were concordant, including 89 negative from both sources and 5 positive from both sources. Eight specimens (8%) were discordant, all of which were positive from the URT and negative from the LRT (Figure 1). Among patients undergoing screening, 3 of 4 positive tests were discordant and among symptomatic patients, 5 of 9 positive tests were discordant. There were no instances of a positive LRT specimen with a negative URT specimen. Conclusion: Overall, most paired samples from the URT and LRT yielded concordant results with no pairs positive from the LRT and negative from the URT. These data support the CDC recommendation that URT specimens are the preferred initial SARS-CoV-2 test, while LRT specimens should be collected only from mechanically ventilated with suspected SARS-CoV-2. (Figure Presented).

11.
University of Toronto Medical Journal ; 98(1):10-12, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1136754
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL