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1.
Cardiometry ; - (23):660-665, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2025912

ABSTRACT

Price downturn was long before the COVID-19 pandemic because most retailers have brick-and-mortar stores. It is crucial to review their store portfolios, including stores in at least three separate segments: shops in closed centers, band centers, or standalone locations and outlets. Once customers are happy to come back, each would possibly have a different pattern of traffic. Product will be modeled according to the type of product being sold and whether it is a purchasing requirement or a fringe. A high level of unemployment is also projected to impact the available revenues to be invested. World shocked by corona pandemic and the global economy as a result. No wonder traditional brick and mortar retail has continued to decline for many years. Widespread countermeasures in many countries are now massively escalating this decline to help slow the virus and close down all but main retail outlets (supermarkets/ businesses, pharmacies/drug shops, post office, and banks). [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Cardiometry is the property of Cardiometry and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

2.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 30(1 SUPPL):357-358, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1880895

ABSTRACT

Background: After COVID-19 shelter-in-place (SIP) orders on 3/16/2020, viral suppression (VS) rates initially decreased within a safety-net HIV clinic in San Francisco, with greater decreases among homeless people living with HIV (PLWH). We sought to understand if (1) proactive outreach to provide social services, (2) scaling up of in-person visits for most patients and drop-in visits at the clinic, and (3) expansion of housing programs could reverse this decline. Methods: We assessed VS 24 months before and 13 months after SIP using mixed-effects logistic regression and propensity score methods, followed by interrupted time series (ITS) analysis to examine changes in the rate of viral suppression per month. Loss to follow-up was assessed via active clinic outreach and tracing using Kaplan-Meier methods. Results: The cohort contained 1816 patients with a median age of 51;12% female, 14% unstably housed, and 15% with CD4+-cell counts <200 cells/mm3. The adjusted odds of VS increased 1.34-fold following the intervention (95% CI: 1.21-1.46), with similar results using inverse probability weighting (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.31;95% CI: 1.17-1.46). Results from the ITS analysis show that the odds of VS continuously increased by 1.05-fold per month over the post-intervention period (95% CI: 1.01-1.08, Figure). Proactive phone outreach successfully reached 90.0% of the clinic to offer services. The one-year cumulative loss to follow-up rate was 3.2% (95% CI: 2.5-3.9%). The proportion of total attended visits that were telephone visits decreased from a maximum of 64.9% to a minimum of 10.1% at the end of the analysis period. The rate of viral load monitoring decreased by 15% after the institution of SIP (95% CI: 0.83-0.88). Among homeless PLWH, the AOR for VS was 1.70 (95% CI: 1.24-2.34) and there was a 5.9% increase in VS per month using ITS methods (95% CI: 1.0-12.3%). Conclusion: After an initial destabilization in VS in a large safety-net clinic following SIP orders, the VS rate increased following scale-up of in-person visits, clinic outreach to patients, intensification of social services during this time, and access to COVID-related housing programs. The loss to follow-up rate was similar or lower compared to prior years. Maintaining in-person care for underserved patients, with flexible telemedicine options, along with provision of social services and permanent expansion of housing assistance programs, will be needed to support VS among underserved populations during the COVID-19 pandemic.

3.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 8(SUPPL 1):S376, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1746449

ABSTRACT

Background. Published data on COVID-19 convalescent plasma (CCP) use in children and obstetric patients is limited. We describe a single-center experience of hospitalized patients who received CCP for acute COVID-19. Methods. We performed a retrospective review of children 0-18-years-old and pregnant patients hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed acute COVID-19 who received CCP from March 1st, 2020 to March 1st, 2021. Clinical and laboratory data were collected to assess the safety of CCP administration. Antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 were measured before and at various timepoints post CCP transfusion. Correlation between SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin administered versus the SARS-CoV-2 anti-Spike immunoglobulin response in patient serum was assessed. Results. Twenty-two children and 10 obstetric patients were eligible. 12 pediatric and 8 obstetric patients had moderate disease and 10 pediatric and 2 obstetric patients had severe disease. 5 pediatric patients died. 18/37 (48.6%) CCP units that were measured met FDA criteria for a high IgG titer. There were no complications with transfusion based on CDC, NHSN Biovigilance Component: Hemovigilance Module Surveillance Protocol. Two pediatric patients had fevers a few hours after CCP with low suspicion for a transfusion reaction. Median SARS-CoV-2 anti-spike antibody levels of pediatric patients post-transfusion for 0-7 days was 80.6AU/mL (range: 2-1070), 8-21 days was 180AU/mL (range: 12-661) and >21 days was 210AU/mL (range: 4.1-1220). For obstetric patients, post-transfusion antibody levels were only obtained 0-7 days post-transfusion with median 45AU/mL (range: 9.5-100). High-titer CCP showed a positive correlation with rise in patient immunoglobulin levels only in the obstetric patients but not in pediatric patients. Conclusion. CCP was administered safely to our moderately to severely ill pediatric and obstetric patients. Among pediatric patients, the median serum antibody level increased over time after transfusion and suggested that CCP did not interfere with the endogenous antibody production. Antibody dose of high-titer CCP correlated with post-transfusion response in only obstetric patients. Randomized trials in pediatric and obstetric patients are needed to further understand how to dose CCP and evaluate efficacy.

4.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 8(SUPPL 1):S805, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1746280

ABSTRACT

Background. Limited data are available on whether there are differences in the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination by HIV status or by mRNA vaccine type. Methods. We saved residual outpatient laboratory samples of all previously mRNA-vaccinated individuals in the adult medicine clinics of a public hospital with a large outpatient HIV clinic during May 2021, and then excluded individuals with prior SARS-CoV-2 infection. We next 1:1 matched 100 PLWH to 100 outpatient HIVnegative adult medicine patients receiving care for chronic medical conditions on days since completion of second vaccination (minimum 10), sex, age +/-5 years, and the type of mRNA vaccine received. We defined a non-response as reciprocal pseudovirus neutralizing titer< 10 and anti-RBD IgG< 10 relative fluorescent units, and compared non-response by HIV status using mixed models. Results. In each matched group there were 13 women;25 received the mRNA-1273 vaccine and 75 received the BNT162b2 vaccine;the median age was 59. The median time from second vaccination was 35 days (IQR: 20-63). Among PLWH, the median CD4+ T-cell count was 511 (IQR: 351-796) and 5 individuals had HIV RNA > 200. We found 2.4-fold greater odds of pseudovirus neutralizing antibody non-response among PLWH compared to people without HIV (95% CI=1.1-5.4). Although few individuals in each group did not mount an IgG response (12 among PLWH vs. 5;p=0.08), continuous anti-RBD IgG concentrations were 43% lower among PLWH (95% CI=0.36-0.88). Among PLWH, when adjusting for age, sex, and days post-vaccination, each 100-cell increase in CD4+T-cell count was associated with 22% higher neutralizing antibody titers (GMR 1.22;95% CI=1.09-1.37). Unsuppressed HIV RNA >200 was associated with 89% lower neutralizing antibody titers (GMR 0.11;95% CI=0.01-0.84). Receipt of the BNT162b2 vs. mRNA-1273 vaccine was associated with 77% lower neutralizing titers (GMR 0.23;95% CI=0.08-0.65) among PLWH. Post-mRNA Vaccination SARS-CoV-2 IgG Concentrations and Pseudovirus Neutralizing Titers by HIV Status and Vaccine Conclusion. PLWH had lower than expected response to mRNA SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, with the highest non-response among those with low CD4+ counts, unsuppressed HIV RNA, and those who received the BNT162b2 vaccine. Immunization strategies to improve immune responses among PLWH should be studied, and may include booster vaccination or preference of the mRNA-1273 vaccine in this group.

5.
Blood ; 138:1410, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582348

ABSTRACT

Background: Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitors (BTKis) are important tools to treat B-cell malignancies. However, duration of treatment may be limited by adverse events (AEs). Zanubrutinib (zanu) is a BTKi approved for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and is in development for other hematologic malignancies. Data from phase 3 head-to-head trials of zanu vs ibrutinib (ibr) in pts with Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) or chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) demonstrated that pts treated with zanu showed lower rates of AEs leading to discontinuation (Blood 2020;136(18):2038-50;EHA 2021 LB1900). Preliminary results from BGB-3111-215 (NCT04116437) show that zanu was well-tolerated in pts who discontinued ibr and/or acalabrutinib (acala) treatment due to AEs (EHA 2021 EP642). Here, we report updated results from the BGB-3111-215 study with a median follow-up of 9 months. Methods: This study is an ongoing US, phase 2, multicenter, single-arm, open-label study. The safety and efficacy of zanu monotherapy (160 mg twice daily or 320 mg once daily) were evaluated in pts with B-cell malignancies who met criteria for continued treatment after having become intolerant to prior BTKi therapy. Pts were divided into cohort 1 (pts who were intolerant to ibr only) and cohort 2 (pts who were intolerant to acala alone/and ibr). Pts with documented progressive disease (PD) on prior BTKi therapy were excluded. Efficacy and safety, including recurrence of intolerant AEs to the prior BTKi, were evaluated. AEs were assessed for severity, seriousness, and relation to zanu;as well as dose reductions, holds, or discontinuations. Response was assessed by investigators based on response criteria for their respective indications (Blood 2008;131:2745;J Clin Oncol 2012;30:2820;J Clin Oncol 2014;32:3059;Br J Haemtol 2013;160:171). Disease parameters from study entry were the baseline for response assessment. Mutational analysis was performed on pts who discontinued treatment, and data will be shared once available. To support clinical findings, kinase selectivity was assessed using Kinome profiling at 100X IC50 (against BTK) for zanu, ibr, acala and its major metabolite, M27 (Reaction Biology Corp). Results: As of 7 June 2021 (data cutoff), 57 pts (n=44 CLL/SLL;n=9 WM;n=2 MCL;n=2 marginal zone lymphoma [MZL]) were enrolled in cohort 1, and 7 pts were enrolled in cohort 2 (n=4 CLL;n=1 WM;n=1 MCL;n=1 MZL). All received ≥1 dose of zanu and were analyzed for safety. The median age was 71 years (range, 49-91) in cohort 1 and 71 years (range, 65-76) in cohort 2;median duration of treatment was 8.7 months (range, 0.6-17.9) in cohort 1 and 8.2 months (range, 6.4-11.4) in cohort 2;median number of prior regimens was 1 (range, 1-12) in cohort 1 and 3 (range, 2-5) in cohort 2. Within cohort 2, 5 pts were intolerant to both ibr and acala. Median number of intolerant events per pt for both cohorts 1 and 2 was 2 (range, 1-5). Overall, 73% of pts did not experience recurrence of their ibr or acala intolerant events and 79% of recurrent events recurred at a lower severity (Figure 1). At cutoff, 54 pts remained on treatment. Reasons for treatment discontinuation were AEs (n=4), PD (n=4), physician's decision (n=1), and consent withdrawal (n=1). Grade ≥3 AEs were reported in 18 pts (28%), and serious AEs occurred in 7 pts (11%). AEs requiring dose interruptions occurred in 17 pts (27%), and AEs leading to dose reduction occurred in 3 pts (5%). One death, due to COVID-19, was reported. Pts demonstrated maintained (41%) and improved (53%) response with zanu treatment from their reported best overall response on prior BTKis for a total disease control rate of 94% (including a 42% partial response rate in pts with CLL/SLL, 30% in pts with WM, and a 20% very good partial response rate in pts with WM). Zanu also demonstrated good selectivity by kinase profiling. It showed >50% inhibition on 7/370 kinases, while ibr, acala, and M27 had more off-target binding (17, 15 and 23 kinases, respectively) at their respective 100X IC50 (BTK) c ncentrations (Figure 2). Conclusion: In pts with B-cell malignancies intolerant to ibr and/or acala, zanu treatment resulted in continued disease control or improved response. Zanu was well-tolerated, and most AEs that led to discontinuation of previous BTKi therapy did not recur or recurred at a lower grade. In support of clinical findings, differentiation between BTKi selectivity profiles favor zanu over ibr and acala. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Shadman: Abbvie, Genentech, AstraZeneca, Sound Biologics, Pharmacyclics, Beigene, Bristol Myers Squibb, Morphosys, TG Therapeutics, Innate Pharma, Kite Pharma, Adaptive Biotechnologies, Epizyme, Eli Lilly, and Atara Biotherapeutics, Adaptimmune: Consultancy;Mustang Bio, Celgene, Bristol Myers Squibb, Pharmacyclics, Gilead, Genentech, Abbvie, TG Therapeutics, Beigene, AstraZeneca, Sunesis, Atara Biotherapeutics, GenMab: Research Funding;Abbvie, Genentech, AstraZeneca, Sound Biologics, Pharmacyclics, Beigene, Bristol Myers Squibb, Morphosys, TG Therapeutics, Innate Pharma, Kite Pharma, Adaptive Biotechnologies, Epizyme, Eli Lilly, and Atara Biotherapeutics, Adaptimmune: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Flinn: Nurix Therapeutics: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute;Seagen: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy and research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;MorphoSys: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy and research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Forty Seven: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Calithera Biosciences: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Verastem: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy and research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Curis: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Takeda: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy and research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Yingli Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute;IGM Biosciences: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;AbbVie: Consultancy, Other: All Consultancy and Research Funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Portola Pharmaceuticals: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Trillium Therapeutics: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Rhizen Pharmaceuticals: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Incyte: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Acerta Pharma: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Agios: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Kite, a Gilead Company: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy and research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Gilead Sciences: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy and research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Pharmacyclics LLC, an AbbVie Company: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy and research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Karyopharm Therapeutics: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Forma Therapeutics: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Genentech: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy and research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;ArQule: Other: All research funding payments mad to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Triphase Research & Development Corp.: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Roche: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy and research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Pfizer: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Teva: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Infinity Pharmaceuticals: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Unum Therapeutics: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy and research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Celgene: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Constellation Pharmaceuticals: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Juno Therapeutics: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy and research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;AstraZeneca: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy and research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Iksuda Therapeutics: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute;Loxo: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Merck: Other: All research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Novartis: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy and research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Great Point Partners: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy payments made toSarah Cannon Research Institute;BeiGene: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy and research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Janssen: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy and research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;TG Therapeutics: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy and research funding payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Century Therapeutics: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute;Hutchison MediPharma: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute;Vincerx Pharma: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute;Sarah Cannon Research Institute: Current Employment;Servier Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute;Yingli Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute;Seagen: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute;Servier Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute;Unum Therapeutics: Consultancy, Other: All consultancy payments made to Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Research Funding;Johnson & Johnson: Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company;Seattle Genetics: Research Funding. Levy: Epizyme: Consultancy, Other: Promotional speaker;Amgen Inc.: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Promotional speaker, Speakers Bureau;Gilead Sciences, Inc.: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau;GSK: Consultancy, Other: Promotional speaker;Morphosys: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Promotional speaker, Speakers Bureau;AbbVie: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Promotional speaker, Speakers Bureau;Beigene: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau;Karyopharm: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Promotional speaker, Speakers Bureau;AstraZeneca: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau;Takeda: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Promotional speaker, Speakers Bureau;Novartis: Consultancy, Other: Promotional speaker;Dova: Consultancy, Other: Promotional speaker;TG Therapeutics: Co sultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau;Bristol Myers Squibb: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Promotional speaker, Speakers Bureau;Seattle Genetics: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Promotional speaker, Speakers Bureau;Jazz Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau;Janssen Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Promotional speaker, Speakers Bureau. Burke: SeaGen: Consultancy, Speakers Bureau;Beigene: Consultancy, Speakers Bureau;MorphoSys: Consultancy;Bristol Myers Squibb: Consultancy;AstraZeneca: Consultancy;Epizyme: Consultancy;Verastem: Consultancy;Kura: Consultancy;Kymera: Consultancy;AbbVie: Consultancy;Adaptive Biotechnologies: Consultancy;Roche/Genentech: Consultancy;X4 Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy. Cultrera: Beigene: Research Funding. Yimer: Astrazeneca: Speakers Bureau;Karyopharm: Current equity holder in publicly-traded company, Speakers Bureau;Janssen: Speakers Bureau;Beigene: Speakers Bureau;GSK: Speakers Bureau;Sanofi: Speakers Bureau;Amgen: Speakers Bureau;Pharmacyclics: Speakers Bureau;Texas Oncology: Current Employment. Chaudhry: Medical Oncology Associates, PS (dba Summit Cancer Centers): Current Employment;Novartis, Immunomedics: Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company. Gandhi: TG Therapeutics: Honoraria;Karyopharm Therapeutics: Honoraria;GlaxoSmithKline: Honoraria. Kingsley: Comprehensive Cancer Centers of Nevada: Current Employment. Tumula: Texas Oncology: Current Employment. Manda: Morphosys: Honoraria;Genmab: Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Chen: BeiGene: Current Employment, Divested equity in a private or publicly-traded company in the past 24 months. Cohen: BeiGene: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company, Other: Travel, Accommodations, Expenses. By: BeiGene, Ltd: Current Employment. Xu: Beigene: Current Employment;AstraZeneca: Ended employment in the past 24 months. Liu: BeiGene Co., Ltd: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Sharman: TG Therapeutics: Consultancy;Centessa: Current holder of stock options in a privately-held company, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Pharmacyclics LLC, an AbbVie Company: Consultancy;BMS: Consultancy;AbbVie: Consultancy;BeiGene: Consultancy;AstraZeneca: Consultancy;Lilly: Consultancy.

6.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 203(9):1, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1407180
7.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 203(9), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1277417

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Mechanical ventilation in COVID-19 infection range between 5-20% and the incidence of Acute kidney injury (AKI) from 20.2-36.6%. The mortality rate in the AKI subset ranges from 54.8-90% in various studies(1-5). The AKI group tends to be promptly admitted to ICU and require mechanical ventilation due to burned of the disease(4). Methods: A retrospective cohort study with SARS-CoV2 positive by RT-PCR on Mechanical Ventilation. Subjects with End stage renal disease, death <24 hours following endotracheal intubation, intubated out of our institution were excluded. AKI was defined according with KDIGO guideline. Renal recovery was defined creatine level that does not meet criteria for AKI stage 1. Kaplan-Maier curve and long-rank test were applied for survival analysis. Cox Proportional. Hazzard Regression was conducted to determine risk factors for Mortality simultaneously. A significant p-value was considered as <0.05. Result: Of 347 patients on mechanical ventilation included to the study, 183(52.7%) where admitted with AKI and 148(42.7%) develop AKI during the hospital course. The rate of mortality in the AKI group was higher compared with patient without AKI(80.7% vs. 31.3%, p<0.000). Subjects with AKI stage 1 had median time of survival 48.5 (95%CI,[36.8-60.1]) days;AKI stage 2 had median time of 13.6 (95%CI,[3.7-23.5]) days;and AKI stage 3 had median time of 10.0 (95%CI,[8.8-11.1]) days. Significant differences were found by Long Rank tests (p=0.000). AKI increased mortality risk in patient on mechanical ventilation (HR, 2.9[1.2-7.0], p=0.018). After adjustment, we determined that Renal recovery at the end of hospital course has comparable mortality risk with subjects without AKI (aHR, 0.82,[0.28-2.38], p<0.70). Increased mortality risk was noted among patient with partially renal recovery (aHR, 8.55,[3.37-21.6], p<0.000) and without recovery (aHR, 7.07,[2.71-18.39], p<0.000). Discussion: Mortality rate in patients with AKI on mechanical ventilation was high but did not differ from other studies in NYC(6) .Various pathophysiological mechanisms are associated with AKI in COVID-19 infection;prerenal azotemia, acute tubular injury, glomerular disease and thrombotic microangiopathy has been reported(7). At any study of COVID-19, patients with AKI are more likely to be admitted in ICU, required mechanical ventilation or died;and the outcomes get worse with higher AKI stages or if progress to Acute kidney disease(4,8). Our cohort found a comparable mortality risk between patients without AKI and whose recover renal function after adequate management. It is imperative to closely monitor patient that develop AKI and inquired in modifiable precipitant factors to prevent progression and facilitate renal recovery. (Table Presented).

8.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 29(1):242, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1250732

ABSTRACT

Background: Although data are mixed, most cohorts show a similar or lower COVID-19 incidence among people living with HIV (PLWH) compared to the general population. However, incidence may be impacted by lower testing rates among vulnerable populations. We compared SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence and IgG levels, and disease severity, among patients with and without HIV receiving care within a county hospital system over a three-month period. Methods: From August through October 2020, remnant serum samples were collected from all PLWH who underwent routine outpatient laboratory testing at San Francisco General Hospital which houses a large HIV clinic (Ward 86). Patients with HIV were matched on time of collection (same day) and age (+/- 5 years) to 1-2 adults without HIV. SARS-CoV-2 levels of IgG levels was quantified in serum using the Pylon IgG assay (100% specificity on internal validation). Seroprevalence was compared by HIV status via conditional logit models, adjusting for sex. For those with reactive results, IgG levels were compared by HIV status using log-transformed generalized estimating equations. Severe disease, assessed via chart review, was defined as requiring oxygen. Results: Among 1,411 individuals (46% PLWH), the median age was 58 (IQR: 49-65), 64% were men. COVID-19 seroprevalence was 3.1% among PLWH compared to 6.8% among people without HIV (adjusted odds ratio 0.41;95% confidence interval (CI): 0.25-0.68, p<0.001). Among those with reactive COVID-19 IgG results (n=72, 20 in PLWH);antibody levels were 47% lower among PLWH (95% CI: 19-65% lower;p=0.003;Figure);however, there was a trend towards higher disease severity among PLWH [15% (n=3) vs. 4% (n=2);p=0.13]. Conclusion: Both seroprevalence, and absolute SARS-CoV-2 IgG levels in those with reactive results, were lower among PLWH, within a time and agematched population of outpatients receiving routine laboratory testing in an urban hospital. PLWH may have had higher adherence to non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) than those without HIV, leading to lower COVID-19 seroprevalence and, possibly, lower COVID-19 IgG levels if infected with a lower viral inoculum due to NPIs. Alternatively, PLWH may mount lower antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2, as has been demonstrated with hepatitis B and yellow fever vaccines. Further studies of COVID-19 susceptibility and immunity are needed among PLWH. Moreover, PLWH should be enrolled in SARS-CoV-2 vaccine studies or followed after vaccination to ensure they mount sufficient humoral responses.

9.
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology ; 224(2):S626-S627, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1141169
10.
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology ; 224(2):S639-S640, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1141112
11.
European Journal of Molecular and Clinical Medicine ; 7(11):47-56, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1006531

ABSTRACT

Corona virus is a pandemic that spreads mainly through contact with any person when they cough and sneeze. Covid-19 pandemic started in China and is then spreading in the world, which is the main cause of large number of deaths (40,598 deaths, 1st April 2020). Covid-19 is a disease in which a person has respiratory disease with symptoms such as severe fever and difficulty in breathing in more severe cases. To prevent the epidemic, many countries also initiated a lockdown process to prevent the number of infections of the disease. This lock down ordered by the government severely affected the lives of the Arabs. And at the same time became a major cause of economic collapse. This is the reason why the country with the highest covid-19 transition recorded a high increase in unemployment. This paper calculates the impact of Covid-19 for affected countries worldwide and their tourism industry. This paper is mainly based on covid-19 in India which analyzes the impact it has had on tourism and hotel industry. Tourism and hotel industry is suffering from covid-19 crisis worldwide. India is the largest country in the world which is rich in various tourism resources, millions of tourists come here annually, which makes a significant contribution to the GDP of the country. Some initial steps need to be taken to overcome the current slowdown in the eco-tourism industry. This paper analyzes their long-term impact.

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