Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 16 de 16
Filter
1.
Toxics ; 10(3)2022 Mar 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765928

ABSTRACT

Poor indoor air quality can have adverse effects on human health, especially in susceptible populations. The aim of this study was to measure the concentrations of dioxide carbon (CO2), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) in situ in private healthcare and elderly care facilities. These pollutants were continuously measured in two rooms of six private healthcare facilities (general practitioner's offices, dental offices and pharmacies) and four elderly care facilities (nursing homes) in two French urban areas during two seasons: summer and winter. The mean CO2 concentrations ranged from 764 ± 443 ppm in dental offices to 624 ± 198 ppm in elderly care facilities. The mean PM2.5 concentrations ranged from 13.4 ± 14.4 µg/m3 in dental offices to 5.7 ± 4.8 µg/m3 in general practitioner offices. The mean TVOC concentrations ranged from 700 ± 641 ppb in dental offices to 143 ± 239 ppb in general practitioner offices. Dental offices presented higher levels of indoor air pollutants, associated with the dental activities. Increasing the ventilation of these facilities by opening a window is probably an appropriate method for reducing pollutant concentrations and maintaining good indoor air quality.

2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-319960

ABSTRACT

Background: Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in intensive care unit patients is a major concern, in particular for those with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). As observed previously for influenza-associated ARDS, the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has shown a high proportion of COVID-19 patients with ARDS to be at risk of developing invasive fungal diseases.MethodsWe used the new international definitions of influenza-associated pulmonary aspergillosis (IAPA) and COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA) to compare the demographic, clinical, biological and radiological aspects of IAPA and CAPA in a monocentric retrospective study.ResultsAmong the 120 ARDS patients included, we observed equivalent prevalence of IPA in Influenza and COVID-19 populations: 17 IAPA (23.9%) and 10 CAPA (20.4%). There were no significant differences in demographic or admission characteristics between patients with and without IPA. Kaplan-Meier curves showed significantly higher 90-day mortality for IPA patients overall (p = 0.032), whereas mortality did not differ between CAPA and IAPA. The duration of mechanical ventilation was higher for IPA patients (23 days [IQR 17–40] than those without (17 days [IQR 9–25], p  = 0.038). Patients with COVID-19 and influenza associated ARDS treated with corticosteroids were more likely to develop IPA. Radiological findings of IPA in both populations using the new criteria increased sensitivity but with still poor specificity. Nonetheless, they also showed interesting differences between IAPA and CAPA with a higher proportion of features suggestive of IPA in IAPA patients. Lastly, therapeutic drug monitoring also appeared challenging since a wide proportion of IPA patients had low plasma voriconazole concentrations, with a significant higher delay to reach voriconazole concentrations > 2mg/L in CAPA versus IAPA patients ( p  = 0.045).ConclusionsICU patients presenting with ARDS during COVID-19 are very similar to those with severe influenza pneumonia in terms of prevalence of IPA and outcome, while CAPA is mainly favored by advanced age irrespective of the background. The dramatic consequences on the patients' prognosis emphasize the need for a better awareness in these particular populations. Larger prospective studies may help in designing the most well-adapted personalized management to prevent IPA, which represents a high burden of death in severe COVID-19 and Influenza pneumonia.

4.
The Lancet. Microbe ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1651965

ABSTRACT

Reports of COVID-19-associated mucormycosis have been increasing in frequency since early 2021, particularly among patients with uncontrolled diabetes. Patients with diabetes and hyperglycaemia often have an inflammatory state that could be potentiated by the activation of antiviral immunity to SARS-CoV2, which might favour secondary infections. In this Review, we analysed 80 published and unpublished cases of COVID-19-associated mucormycosis. Uncontrolled diabetes, as well as systemic corticosteroid treatment, were present in most patients with COVID-19-associated mucormycosis, and rhino-orbital cerebral mucormycosis was the most frequent disease. Mortality was high at 49%, which was particularly due to patients with pulmonary or disseminated mucormycosis or cerebral involvement. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of patients who survived had life-changing morbidities (eg, loss of vision in 46% of survivors). Our Review indicates that COVID-19-associated mucormycosis is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis of pulmonary mucormycosis is particularly challenging, and might be frequently missed in India.

5.
J Clin Microbiol ; 60(1): e0168921, 2022 01 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1630019

ABSTRACT

This multicenter study evaluated the IMMY Aspergillus Galactomannan Lateral Flow Assay (LFA) with automated reader for diagnosis of pulmonary aspergillosis in patients with COVID-19-associated acute respiratory failure (ARF) requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission between 03/2020 and 04/2021. A total of 196 respiratory samples and 148 serum samples (n = 344) from 238 patients were retrospectively included, with a maximum of one of each sample type per patient. Cases were retrospectively classified for COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA) status following the 2020 consensus criteria, with the exclusion of LFA results as a mycological criterion. At the 1.0 cutoff, sensitivity of LFA for CAPA (proven/probable/possible) was 52%, 80% and 81%, and specificity was 98%, 88% and 67%, for bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), nondirected bronchoalveolar lavage (NBL), and tracheal aspiration (TA), respectively. At the 0.5 manufacturer's cutoff, sensitivity was 72%, 90% and 100%, and specificity was 79%, 83% and 44%, for BALF, NBL and TA, respectively. When combining all respiratory samples, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) was 0.823, versus 0.754, 0.890 and 0.814 for BALF, NBL and TA, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of serum LFA were 20% and 93%, respectively, at the 0.5 ODI cutoff. Overall, the Aspergillus Galactomannan LFA showed good performances for CAPA diagnosis, when used from respiratory samples at the 1.0 cutoff, while sensitivity from serum was limited, linked to weak invasiveness during CAPA. As some false-positive results can occur, isolated results slightly above the recommended cutoff should lead to further mycological investigations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis , Pulmonary Aspergillosis , Aspergillus , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , Humans , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/diagnosis , Mannans , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity
6.
Lancet Respir Med ; 10(2): 180-190, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537209

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with severe COVID-19 have emerged as a population at high risk of invasive fungal infections (IFIs). However, to our knowledge, the prevalence of IFIs has not yet been assessed in large populations of mechanically ventilated patients. We aimed to identify the prevalence, risk factors, and mortality associated with IFIs in mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19 under intensive care. METHODS: We performed a national, multicentre, observational cohort study in 18 French intensive care units (ICUs). We retrospectively and prospectively enrolled adult patients (aged ≥18 years) with RT-PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and requiring mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory distress syndrome, with all demographic and clinical and biological follow-up data anonymised and collected from electronic case report forms. Patients were systematically screened for respiratory fungal microorganisms once or twice a week during the period of mechanical ventilation up to ICU discharge. The primary outcome was the prevalence of IFIs in all eligible participants with a minimum of three microbiological samples screened during ICU admission, with proven or probable (pr/pb) COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA) classified according to the recent ECMM/ISHAM definitions. Secondary outcomes were risk factors of pr/pb CAPA, ICU mortality between the pr/pb CAPA and non-pr/pb CAPA groups, and associations of pr/pb CAPA and related variables with ICU mortality, identified by regression models. The MYCOVID study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04368221. FINDINGS: Between Feb 29 and July 9, 2020, we enrolled 565 mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19. 509 patients with at least three screening samples were analysed (mean age 59·4 years [SD 12·5], 400 [79%] men). 128 (25%) patients had 138 episodes of pr/pb or possible IFIs. 76 (15%) patients fulfilled the criteria for pr/pb CAPA. According to multivariate analysis, age older than 62 years (odds ratio [OR] 2·34 [95% CI 1·39-3·92], p=0·0013), treatment with dexamethasone and anti-IL-6 (OR 2·71 [1·12-6·56], p=0·027), and long duration of mechanical ventilation (>14 days; OR 2·16 [1·14-4·09], p=0·019) were independently associated with pr/pb CAPA. 38 (7%) patients had one or more other pr/pb IFIs: 32 (6%) had candidaemia, six (1%) had invasive mucormycosis, and one (<1%) had invasive fusariosis. Multivariate analysis of associations with death, adjusted for candidaemia, for the 509 patients identified three significant factors: age older than 62 years (hazard ratio [HR] 1·71 [95% CI 1·26-2·32], p=0·0005), solid organ transplantation (HR 2·46 [1·53-3·95], p=0·0002), and pr/pb CAPA (HR 1·45 [95% CI 1·03-2·03], p=0·033). At time of ICU discharge, survival curves showed that overall ICU mortality was significantly higher in patients with pr/pb CAPA than in those without, at 61·8% (95% CI 50·0-72·8) versus 32·1% (27·7-36·7; p<0·0001). INTERPRETATION: This study shows the high prevalence of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and candidaemia and high mortality associated with pr/pb CAPA in mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19. These findings highlight the need for active surveillance of fungal pathogens in patients with severe COVID-19. FUNDING: Pfizer.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Aspergillosis , Adolescent , Adult , Child, Preschool , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(2): e0113821, 2021 10 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476402

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to evaluate diagnostic means, host factors, delay of occurrence, and outcome of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia and fungal coinfections in the intensive care unit (ICU). From 1 February to 31 May 2020, we anonymously recorded COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA), fungemia (CA-fungemia), and pneumocystosis (CA-PCP) from 36 centers, including results on fungal biomarkers in respiratory specimens and serum. We collected data from 154 episodes of CAPA, 81 of CA-fungemia, 17 of CA-PCP, and 5 of other mold infections from 244 patients (male/female [M/F] ratio = 3.5; mean age, 64.7 ± 10.8 years). CA-PCP occurred first after ICU admission (median, 1 day; interquartile range [IQR], 0 to 3 days), followed by CAPA (9 days; IQR, 5 to 13 days), and then CA-fungemia (16 days; IQR, 12 to 23 days) (P < 10-4). For CAPA, the presence of several mycological criteria was associated with death (P < 10-4). Serum galactomannan was rarely positive (<20%). The mortality rates were 76.7% (23/30) in patients with host factors for invasive fungal disease, 45.2% (14/31) in those with a preexisting pulmonary condition, and 36.6% (34/93) in the remaining patients (P = 0.001). Antimold treatment did not alter prognosis (P = 0.370). Candida albicans was responsible for 59.3% of CA-fungemias, with a global mortality of 45.7%. For CA-PCP, 58.8% of the episodes occurred in patients with known host factors of PCP, and the mortality rate was 29.5%. CAPA may be in part hospital acquired and could benefit from antifungal prescription at the first positive biomarker result. CA-fungemia appeared linked to ICU stay without COVID-19 specificity, while CA-PCP may not really be a concern in the ICU. Improved diagnostic strategy for fungal markers in ICU patients with COVID-19 should support these hypotheses. IMPORTANCE To diagnose fungal coinfections in patients with COVID-19 in the intensive care unit, it is necessary to implement the correct treatment and to prevent them if possible. For COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA), respiratory specimens remain the best approach since serum biomarkers are rarely positive. Timing of occurrence suggests that CAPA could be hospital acquired. The associated mortality varies from 36.6% to 76.7% when no host factors or host factors of invasive fungal diseases are present, respectively. Fungemias occurred after 2 weeks in ICUs and are associated with a mortality rate of 45.7%. Candida albicans is the first yeast species recovered, with no specificity linked to COVID-19. Pneumocystosis was mainly found in patients with known immunodepression. The diagnosis occurred at the entry in ICUs and not afterwards, suggesting that if Pneumocystis jirovecii plays a role, it is upstream of the hospitalization in the ICU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection/mortality , Fungemia/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis/epidemiology , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/epidemiology , Aged , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Critical Care , Female , France/epidemiology , Fungemia/drug therapy , Fungemia/mortality , Galactose/analogs & derivatives , Galactose/blood , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Mannans/blood , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis/mortality , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/drug therapy , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/mortality , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
8.
Mycoses ; 64(9): 980-988, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273123

ABSTRACT

It is now well known that patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection admitted in ICU and mechanically ventilated are at risk of developing invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). Nevertheless, symptomatology of IPA is often atypical in mechanically ventilated patients, and radiological aspects in SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia and IPA are difficult to differentiate. In this context, the significance of the presence of Aspergillus in airway specimens (detected by culture, galactomannan antigen or specific PCR) remains to be fully understood. To decipher the relevance of the detection of Aspergillus, we performed a comprehensive review of all published cases of respiratory Aspergillus colonisation and IPA in COVID-19 patients. The comparison of patients receiving or not antifungal treatment allowed us to highlight the most important criteria for the decision to treat. The comparison of surviving and non-surviving patients made it possible to unveil criteria associated with mortality that should be taken into account in the treatment decision.


Subject(s)
Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/microbiology , COVID-19/microbiology , Cause of Death , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/diagnosis , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/drug therapy , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/mortality , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Mycoses ; 64(9): 1028-1037, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270864

ABSTRACT

Reports are increasing on the emergence of COVID-19-associated mucormycosis (CAM) globally, driven particularly by low- and middle-income countries. The recent unprecedented surge of CAM in India has drawn worldwide attention. More than 28,252 mucormycosis cases are counted and India is the first country where mucormycosis has been declared a notifiable disease. However, misconception of management, diagnosing and treating this infection continue to occur. Thus, European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM) and the International Society for Human and Animal Mycology (ISHAM) felt the need to address clinical management of CAM in low- and middle-income countries. This article provides a comprehensive document to help clinicians in managing this infection. Uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and inappropriate (high dose or not indicated) corticosteroid use are the major predisposing factors for this surge. High counts of Mucorales spores in both the indoor and outdoor environments, and the immunosuppressive impact of COVID-19 patients as well as immunotherapy are possible additional factors. Furthermore, a hyperglycaemic state leads to an increased expression of glucose regulated protein (GRP- 78) in endothelial cells that may help the entry of Mucorales into tissues. Rhino-orbital mucormycosis is the most common presentation followed by pulmonary mucormycosis. Recommendations are focused on the early suspicion of the disease and confirmation of diagnosis. Regarding management, glycaemic control, elimination of corticosteroid therapy, extensive surgical debridement and antifungal therapy are the standards for proper care. Due to limited availability of amphotericin B formulations during the present epidemic, alternative antifungal therapies are also discussed.


Subject(s)
Antifungal Agents/standards , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Intensive Care Units/standards , Mucormycosis/diagnosis , Mucormycosis/drug therapy , Mucormycosis/physiopathology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/microbiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
10.
J Fungi (Basel) ; 7(5)2021 May 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234760

ABSTRACT

Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in intensive care unit patients is a major concern. Influenza-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and severe COVID-19 patients are both at risk of developing invasive fungal diseases. We used the new international definitions of influenza-associated pulmonary aspergillosis (IAPA) and COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA) to compare the demographic, clinical, biological, and radiological aspects of IAPA and CAPA in a monocentric retrospective study. A total of 120 patients were included, 71 with influenza and 49 with COVID-19-associated ARDS. Among them, 27 fulfilled the newly published criteria of IPA: 17/71 IAPA (23.9%) and 10/49 CAPA (20.4%). Kaplan-Meier curves showed significantly higher 90-day mortality for IPA patients overall (p = 0.032), whereas mortality did not differ between CAPA and IAPA patients. Radiological findings showed differences between IAPA and CAPA, with a higher proportion of features suggestive of IPA during IAPA. Lastly, a wide proportion of IPA patients had low plasma voriconazole concentrations with a higher delay to reach concentrations > 2 mg/L in CAPA vs. IAPA patients (p = 0.045). Severe COVID-19 and influenza patients appeared very similar in terms of prevalence of IPA and outcome. The dramatic consequences on the patients' prognosis emphasize the need for a better awareness in these particular populations.

14.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 27(4): 1077-1086, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067634

ABSTRACT

Pneumonia caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 emerged in China at the end of 2019. Because of the severe immunomodulation and lymphocyte depletion caused by this virus and the subsequent administration of drugs directed at the immune system, we anticipated that patients might experience fungal superinfection. We collected data from 186 patients who had coronavirus disease-associated pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA) worldwide during March-August 2020. Overall, 182 patients were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), including 180 with acute respiratory distress syndrome and 175 who received mechanical ventilation. CAPA was diagnosed a median of 10 days after coronavirus disease diagnosis. Aspergillus fumigatus was identified in 80.3% of patient cultures, 4 of which were azole-resistant. Most (52.7%) patients received voriconazole. In total, 52.2% of patients died; of the deaths, 33.0% were attributed to CAPA. We found that the cumulative incidence of CAPA in the ICU ranged from 1.0% to 39.1%.


Subject(s)
Aspergillus fumigatus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Pulmonary Aspergillosis , Voriconazole/therapeutic use , Aged , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Immunologic Factors/adverse effects , Incidence , International Cooperation , Male , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/diagnosis , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/drug therapy , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/mortality , Registries , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
15.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 21(6): e149-e162, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-974782

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 causes direct damage to the airway epithelium, enabling aspergillus invasion. Reports of COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis have raised concerns about it worsening the disease course of COVID-19 and increasing mortality. Additionally, the first cases of COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis caused by azole-resistant aspergillus have been reported. This article constitutes a consensus statement on defining and managing COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis, prepared by experts and endorsed by medical mycology societies. COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis is proposed to be defined as possible, probable, or proven on the basis of sample validity and thus diagnostic certainty. Recommended first-line therapy is either voriconazole or isavuconazole. If azole resistance is a concern, then liposomal amphotericin B is the drug of choice. Our aim is to provide definitions for clinical research and up-to-date recommendations for clinical management of the diagnosis and treatment of COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis.


Subject(s)
Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Coinfection/drug therapy , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/complications , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/drug therapy , Amphotericin B , Azoles/pharmacology , Humans , Nitriles , Pyridines , SARS-CoV-2 , Triazoles , Voriconazole/therapeutic use
16.
J Fungi (Basel) ; 6(3)2020 Jul 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646390

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: The diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis (IA) in an intensive care unit (ICU)remains a challenge and the COVID-19 epidemic makes it even harder. Here, we evaluatedAspergillus PCR input to help classifying IA in SARS-CoV-2-infected patients. (2) Methods: 45COVID-19 patients were prospectively monitored twice weekly for Aspergillus markers and anti-Aspergillus serology. We evaluated the concordance between (Ι) Aspergillus PCR and culture inrespiratory samples, and (ΙΙ) blood PCR and serum galactomannan. Patients were classified asputative/proven/colonized using AspICU algorithm and two other methods. (3) Results: Theconcordance of techniques applied on respiratory and blood samples was moderate (kappa = 0.58and kappa = 0.63, respectively), with a higher sensitivity of PCR. According to AspICU, 9/45 patientswere classified as putative IA. When incorporating PCR results, 15 were putative IA because theymet all criteria, probably with a lack of specificity in the context of COVID-19. Using a modifiedAspICU algorithm, eight patients were classified as colonized and seven as putative IA. (4)Conclusion: An appreciation of the fungal burden using PCR and Aspergillus serology was addedto propose a modified AspICU algorithm. This proof of concept seemed relevant, as it was inagreement with the outcome of patients, but will need validation in larger cohorts.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL