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1.
PLoS Pathog ; 18(7): e1010618, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1923717

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 emerged in late 2019, rapidly reached pandemic status, and has maintained global ubiquity through the emergence of variants of concern. Efforts to develop animal models have mostly fallen short of recapitulating severe disease, diminishing their utility for research focusing on severe disease pathogenesis and life-saving medical countermeasures. We tested whether route of experimental infection substantially changes COVID-19 disease characteristics in two species of nonhuman primates (Macaca mulatta; rhesus macaques; RM, Chlorocebus atheiops; African green monkeys; AGM). Species-specific cohorts were experimentally infected with SARS-CoV-2 by either direct mucosal (intratracheal + intranasal) instillation or small particle aerosol in route-discrete subcohorts. Both species demonstrated analogous viral loads in all compartments by either exposure route although the magnitude and duration of viral loading was marginally greater in AGMs than RMs. Clinical onset was nearly immediate (+1dpi) in the mucosal exposure cohort whereas clinical signs and cytokine responses in aerosol exposure animals began +7dpi. Pathologies conserved in both species and both exposure modalities include pulmonary myeloid cell influx, development of pleuritis, and extended lack of regenerative capacity in the pulmonary compartment. Demonstration of conserved pulmonary pathology regardless of species and exposure route expands our understanding of how SARS-CoV-2 infection may lead to ARDS and/or functional lung damage and demonstrates the near clinical response of the nonhuman primate model for anti-fibrotic therapeutic evaluation studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aerosols , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Lung/pathology , Macaca mulatta , SARS-CoV-2
2.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(12): e1010162, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595940

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19 disease, has killed over five million people worldwide as of December 2021 with infections rising again due to the emergence of highly transmissible variants. Animal models that faithfully recapitulate human disease are critical for assessing SARS-CoV-2 viral and immune dynamics, for understanding mechanisms of disease, and for testing vaccines and therapeutics. Pigtail macaques (PTM, Macaca nemestrina) demonstrate a rapid and severe disease course when infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), including the development of severe cardiovascular symptoms that are pertinent to COVID-19 manifestations in humans. We thus proposed this species may likewise exhibit severe COVID-19 disease upon infection with SARS-CoV-2. Here, we extensively studied a cohort of SARS-CoV-2-infected PTM euthanized either 6- or 21-days after respiratory viral challenge. We show that PTM demonstrate largely mild-to-moderate COVID-19 disease. Pulmonary infiltrates were dominated by T cells, including CD4+ T cells that upregulate CD8 and express cytotoxic molecules, as well as virus-targeting T cells that were predominantly CD4+. We also noted increases in inflammatory and coagulation markers in blood, pulmonary pathologic lesions, and the development of neutralizing antibodies. Together, our data demonstrate that SARS-CoV-2 infection of PTM recapitulates important features of COVID-19 and reveals new immune and viral dynamics and thus may serve as a useful animal model for studying pathogenesis and testing vaccines and therapeutics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disease Models, Animal , Macaca nemestrina , Monkey Diseases/virology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Male , Monkey Diseases/immunology , Monkey Diseases/pathology , Monkey Diseases/physiopathology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
3.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 11: 753444, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555153

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a respiratory borne pathogenic beta coronavirus that is the source of a worldwide pandemic and the cause of multiple pathologies in man. The rhesus macaque model of COVID-19 was utilized to test the added benefit of combinatory parenteral administration of two high-affinity anti-SARS-CoV-2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs; C144-LS and C135-LS) expressly developed to neutralize the virus and modified to extend their pharmacokinetics. After completion of kinetics study of mAbs in the primate, combination treatment was administered prophylactically to mucosal viral challenge. Results showed near complete virus neutralization evidenced by no measurable titer in mucosal tissue swabs, muting of cytokine/chemokine response, and lack of any discernable pathologic sequalae. Blocking infection was a dose-related effect, cohorts receiving lower doses (6, 2 mg/kg) resulted in low grade viral infection in various mucosal sites compared to that of a fully protective dose (20 mg/kg). A subset of animals within this cohort whose infectious challenge was delayed 75 days later after mAb administration were still protected from disease. Results indicate this combination mAb effectively blocks development of COVID-19 in the rhesus disease model and accelerates the prospect of clinical studies with this effective antibody combination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Viral Envelope Proteins , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Humans , Macaca mulatta , Membrane Glycoproteins , Neutralization Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
4.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-293281

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has caused a worldwide pandemic resulting in widespread efforts in development of animal models that recapitulate human disease for evaluation of medical countermeasures, and to dissect COVID-19 immunopathogenesis. We tested whether route of experimental infection substantially changes COVID-19 disease characteristics in two species (Macaca mulatta;rhesus macaques;RM, Chlorocebus atheiops;African green monkeys;AGM) of nonhuman primates. Species-specific cohorts of RM and AGM Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta, RMs) and African green monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops, AGMs) were experimentally infected with homologous SARS-CoV-2 by either direct mucosal instillation or small particle aerosol in route-discrete subcohorts. Both species demonstrated equivalent infection initially by either exposure route although the magnitude and duration of viral loading was greater in AGMs than that of the RM. Clinical onset was nearly immediate (+1dpi) in mucosally-exposed cohorts whereas aerosol-infected animals began to show signs +7dpi. Myeloid cell responses indicative of the development of pulmonary scarring and extended lack of regenerative capacity in the pulmonary compartment was a conserved pathologic response in both species by either exposure modality. This pathological commonality may be useful in future anti-fibrosis therapeutic evaluations and expands our understanding of how SARS-CoV-2 infection leads to ARDS and functional lung damage.

5.
Sci Immunol ; 6(61)2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315792

ABSTRACT

Ongoing SARS-CoV-2 vaccine development is focused on identifying stable, cost-effective, and accessible candidates for global use, specifically in low and middle-income countries. Here, we report the efficacy of a rapidly scalable, novel yeast expressed SARS-CoV-2 specific receptor-binding domain (RBD) based vaccine in rhesus macaques. We formulated the RBD immunogen in alum, a licensed and an emerging alum adsorbed TLR-7/8 targeted, 3M-052-alum adjuvants. The RBD+3M-052-alum adjuvanted vaccine promoted better RBD binding and effector antibodies, higher CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies, improved Th1 biased CD4+T cell reactions, and increased CD8+ T cell responses when compared to the alum-alone adjuvanted vaccine. RBD+3M-052-alum induced a significant reduction of SARS-CoV-2 virus in respiratory tract upon challenge, accompanied by reduced lung inflammation when compared with unvaccinated controls. Anti-RBD antibody responses in vaccinated animals inversely correlated with viral load in nasal secretions and BAL. RBD+3M-052-alum blocked a post SARS-CoV-2 challenge increase in CD14+CD16++ intermediate blood monocytes, and Fractalkine, MCP-1, and TRAIL in the plasma. Decreased plasma analytes and intermediate monocyte frequencies correlated with reduced nasal and BAL viral loads. Lastly, RBD-specific plasma cells accumulated in the draining lymph nodes and not in the bone marrow, contrary to previous findings. Together, these data show that a yeast expressed, RBD-based vaccine+3M-052-alum provides robust immune responses and protection against SARS-CoV-2, making it a strong and scalable vaccine candidate.


Subject(s)
Adjuvants, Immunologic/administration & dosage , Alum Compounds/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Saccharomycetales/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Administration, Inhalation , Administration, Intranasal , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Cytokines/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Lung/pathology , Macaca mulatta , Male , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Viral Load
6.
Sci Immunol ; 6(60)2021 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270873

ABSTRACT

The inclusion of infants in the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine roll-out is important to prevent severe complications of pediatric SARS-CoV-2 infections and to limit transmission and could possibly be implemented via the global pediatric vaccine schedule. However, age-dependent differences in immune function require careful evaluation of novel vaccines in the pediatric population. Toward this goal, we assessed the safety and immunogenicity of two SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. Two groups of 8 infant rhesus macaques (RMs) were immunized intramuscularly at weeks 0 and 4 with stabilized prefusion SARS-CoV-2 S-2P spike (S) protein encoded by mRNA encapsulated in lipid nanoparticles (mRNA-LNP) or the purified S protein mixed with 3M-052, a synthetic TLR7/8 agonist in a squalene emulsion (Protein+3M-052-SE). Neither vaccine induced adverse effects. Both vaccines elicited high magnitude IgG binding to RBD, N terminus domain, S1, and S2, ACE2 blocking activity, and high neutralizing antibody titers, all peaking at week 6. S-specific memory B cells were detected by week 4 and S-specific T cell responses were dominated by the production of IL-17, IFN-γ, or TNF-α. Antibody and cellular responses were stable through week 22. The immune responses for the mRNA-LNP vaccine were of a similar magnitude to those elicited by the Moderna mRNA-1273 vaccine in adults. The S-2P mRNA-LNP and Protein-3M-052-SE vaccines were well-tolerated and highly immunogenic in infant RMs, providing proof-of concept for a pediatric SARS-CoV-2 vaccine with the potential for durable immunity that might decrease the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and mitigate the ongoing health and socioeconomic impacts of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Animals , Animals, Newborn , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/prevention & control , Macaca mulatta , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/administration & dosage , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
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