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1.
Frontiers in medicine ; 7:356-356, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-689148

ABSTRACT

Faced with the rapid spread of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), a global public health threat, psychiatric hospitals are under huge pressure to prevent and control nosocomial infection The current research analyzed the COVID-19 infection control practices in a regional mental health center in China and addressed how this type of medical institutions could enhance their ability to prevent and control hospital transmission of major respiratory diseases and general management of nosocomial infection risks Firstly, hospital-related risks of COVID-19 were analyzed, and targeted prevention and control measures were then established Pre- and post-intervention theoretical knowledge of nosocomial infection control, hand hygiene compliance and accuracy, use of personal protective equipment, and disinfection and sterilization effectiveness were evaluated and compared All the indexes displayed significant improvements following the implementation of the prevention and control measures Up to the submission of this paper, the mental health center had obtained no suspected or confirmed case of COVID-19 infection due to hospital transmission The findings provide empirical evidence for the effectiveness of the COVID-19 preventive strategies and have important implications for integrated and characterized infection control in mental health centers during a major epidemic The establishment of the transitional isolation ward and air fumigation using traditional Chinese medicine for patients and staff are preventive measures worthy of further discussion and dissemination

2.
Respir Res ; 21(1): 172, 2020 Jul 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-656136

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with underlying comorbidities can have worse outcomes. However, the effect of hypertension on outcomes of COVID-19 patients remains unclear. RESEARCH QUESTION: The aim of this study was to explore the effect of hypertension on the outcomes of patients with COVID-19 by using propensity score-matching (PSM) analysis. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Participants enrolled in this study were patients with COVID-19 who had been hospitalized at the Central Hospital of Wuhan, China. Chronic comorbidities and laboratory and radiological data were reviewed; patient outcomes and lengths of stay were obtained from discharge records. We used the Cox proportional-hazard model (CPHM) to analyze the effect of hypertension on these patients' outcomes and PSM analysis to further validate the abovementioned effect. RESULTS: A total of 226 patients with COVID-19 were enrolled in this study, of whom 176 survived and 50 died. The proportion of patients with hypertension among non-survivors was higher than that among survivors (26.70% vs. 74.00%; P < 0.001). Results obtained via CPHM showed that hypertension could increase risk of mortality in COVID-19 patients (hazard ratio 3.317; 95% CI [1.709-6.440]; P < 0.001). Increased D-dimer levels and higher ratio of neutrophils to lymphocytes (N/L) were also found to increase these patients' mortality risk. After matching on propensity score, we still came to similar conclusions. After we applied the same method in critically ill patients, we found that hypertension also increased risk of death in patients with severe COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Hypertension, increased D-dimer and the ratio of neutrophil to lymphocyte increased mortality in patients with COVID-19, with hypertension in particular.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Hypertension/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , China/epidemiology , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hypertension/diagnosis , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Propensity Score , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors , Survival Analysis , Survivors , Tertiary Care Centers
3.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 12(13): 12504-12516, 2020 07 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640201

ABSTRACT

The mortality rate of elderly patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) was significantly higher than the overall mortality rate. However, besides age, leading death risk factors for the high mortality in elderly patients remain unidentified. This retrospective study included 210 elderly COVID-19 patients (aged ≥ 65 years), of whom 175 patients were discharged and 35 died. All deceased patients had at least one comorbidity. A significantly higher proportion of patients in the deceased group had cardiovascular diseases (49% vs. 20%), respiratory diseases (51% vs. 11%), chronic kidney disease (29% vs. 5%) and cerebrovascular disease (20% vs. 3%) than that in the discharged group. The median levels of C-reactive protein (125.8mg/L vs. 9.3mg/L) and blood urea nitrogen (7.2mmol/L vs. 4.4mmol/L) were significantly higher and median lymphocyte counts (0.7×109/L vs. 1.1×109/L) significantly lower in the deceased group than those in the discharged group. The survival curve analysis showed that higher C-reactive protein (≥5mg/L) plus any other abnormalities of lymphocyte, blood urea nitrogen or lactate dehydrogenase significantly predicted poor prognosis of COVID-19 infected elderly patients. This study revealed that the risk factors for the death in these elderly patients included comorbidities, increased levels of C-reactive protein and blood urea nitrogen, and lymphopenia during hospitalization.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , Blood Urea Nitrogen , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , China , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Female , Humans , Lymphopenia/virology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
4.
Chinese Journal of Bioinformatics ; 18(2):96-102, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-615024

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, a pneumonia outbreak caused by a human coronavirus was reported in Wuhan (China) This virus was predicted as a new coronavirus, named the 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV), as it caused clinical symptoms different from Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) during the 2003 outbreak Currently, most of the researchers simply use the complete genome or specific structural gene sequences to investigate coronavirus (e g phylogenetic analysis) without considering the functions of the products from coronavirus genes To overcome this shortcoming, we proposed the joint analysis of the molecular function and phylogeny, and applied it in our previous study of genomes of Betacoronavirus subgroup B(BB coronavirus) In that study, we identified a 22-bp complemented palindrome from a highly conserved Coding Sequence (CDS) Both the 22-bp complemented palindrome (named Nankai complemented palindrome) and the CDS (named Nankai CDS), evolutionary conserved in BB coronavirus genomes, were identified as genomic features associated to the molecular functions of BB coronavirus In the present study, we used these two genomic features to trace the origin of 2019-nCoV (GenBank: MN908947) and conduct a preliminary study of the mechanisms in the cross-species infection and host adaption of BB coronavirus Our analytical results show that 2019-nCoV with large differences from the SARS coronavirus, may originate from BB coronaviruses in bats The most important finding is that the alternative translation of Nankai CDS could produce more than 17 putative proteins, which may be responsible for the host adaption The genotyping of 13 viruses using the 17 putative proteins revealed the high mutation rate and diversity of BB coronavirus Our study, for the first time, aimed to explain the reason for the high host adaptability of the multi-host BB coronavirus at the molecular level using large amounts of genomic data The findings in the present study laid foundations for the rapid detection, genotyping, vaccine development and drug design of, but not limited to BB coronavirus

5.
J Infect ; 81(2): 318-356, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-46816
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