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1.
Clin Imaging ; 83: 152-158, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1630814

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in dramatic loss of life worldwide, but as the large number of acutely ill patients subsides, the emerging group of "COVID-19 long-haulers" present a clinical challenge. Studies have shown that many of these patients suffer long-term pulmonary disease related to residual fibrosis. Prior studies have shown that while many patients have non-specific findings of fibrotic-like changes, others develop specific patterns of interstitial lung disease. CASE REPORT: Here, we present the first case of a patient developing pulmonary sarcoidosis one year after critical illness from COVID-19. He developed numerous non-necrotizing and well-formed granulomas in mediastinal lymph nodes and pulmonary nodules, compatible radiographically and pathologically with sarcoid. CONCLUSIONS: While the pathophysiology of sarcoid is incompletely understood, inflammation is mediated through the dysregulation of a number of different cytokines (IFNγ, IL-2, IL-12, IL-17, IL-22). This case provides valuable clues for better understanding of the shared pathophysiology of cytokine dysregulation seen in COVID-19 and other interstitial lung diseases such as sarcoidosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sarcoidosis, Pulmonary , Sarcoidosis , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sarcoidosis/pathology , Sarcoidosis, Pulmonary/chemically induced , Sarcoidosis, Pulmonary/diagnostic imaging , Sarcoidosis, Pulmonary/pathology
2.
Thorax ; 76(12): 1242-1245, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518155

ABSTRACT

The risk factors for development of fibrotic-like radiographic abnormalities after severe COVID-19 are incompletely described and the extent to which CT findings correlate with symptoms and physical function after hospitalisation remains unclear. At 4 months after hospitalisation, fibrotic-like patterns were more common in those who underwent mechanical ventilation (72%) than in those who did not (20%). We demonstrate that severity of initial illness, duration of mechanical ventilation, lactate dehydrogenase on admission and leucocyte telomere length are independent risk factors for fibrotic-like radiographic abnormalities. These fibrotic-like changes correlate with lung function, cough and measures of frailty, but not with dyspnoea.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Fibrosis , Telomere , COVID-19/complications , Dyspnea , Fibrosis , Humans , Pulmonary Fibrosis/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Fibrosis/genetics , Pulmonary Fibrosis/virology , Telomere/genetics
3.
Nat Med ; 27(4): 601-615, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517636

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the pathogen responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which has resulted in global healthcare crises and strained health resources. As the population of patients recovering from COVID-19 grows, it is paramount to establish an understanding of the healthcare issues surrounding them. COVID-19 is now recognized as a multi-organ disease with a broad spectrum of manifestations. Similarly to post-acute viral syndromes described in survivors of other virulent coronavirus epidemics, there are increasing reports of persistent and prolonged effects after acute COVID-19. Patient advocacy groups, many members of which identify themselves as long haulers, have helped contribute to the recognition of post-acute COVID-19, a syndrome characterized by persistent symptoms and/or delayed or long-term complications beyond 4 weeks from the onset of symptoms. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the current literature on post-acute COVID-19, its pathophysiology and its organ-specific sequelae. Finally, we discuss relevant considerations for the multidisciplinary care of COVID-19 survivors and propose a framework for the identification of those at high risk for post-acute COVID-19 and their coordinated management through dedicated COVID-19 clinics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Disease , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Humans , Patient Advocacy , Syndrome , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
4.
Nat Med ; 27(4): 601-615, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147038

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the pathogen responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which has resulted in global healthcare crises and strained health resources. As the population of patients recovering from COVID-19 grows, it is paramount to establish an understanding of the healthcare issues surrounding them. COVID-19 is now recognized as a multi-organ disease with a broad spectrum of manifestations. Similarly to post-acute viral syndromes described in survivors of other virulent coronavirus epidemics, there are increasing reports of persistent and prolonged effects after acute COVID-19. Patient advocacy groups, many members of which identify themselves as long haulers, have helped contribute to the recognition of post-acute COVID-19, a syndrome characterized by persistent symptoms and/or delayed or long-term complications beyond 4 weeks from the onset of symptoms. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the current literature on post-acute COVID-19, its pathophysiology and its organ-specific sequelae. Finally, we discuss relevant considerations for the multidisciplinary care of COVID-19 survivors and propose a framework for the identification of those at high risk for post-acute COVID-19 and their coordinated management through dedicated COVID-19 clinics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Disease , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Humans , Patient Advocacy , Syndrome , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
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