Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 22
Filter
1.
Iraqi Journal of Hematology ; 11(2):196-200, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2201733

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has wreaked havoc ever since its inception and with the protean manifestations of the disease, it is imperative that progressively data are added to the literature. COVID-19 infection is a multisystem disorder with a wide range of clinical symptomatology. Recent information garnered has laid emphasis on pathological changes at microvascular level causing thrombotic/hemostatic defects, leading to the assorted clinical presentation. We present a consortium of three confirmed COVID-19 cases whose hospital course got convoluted with grave hematological complications in the form of hemolytic uremic syndrome and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Regrettably, all three patients succumbed to their illness.

2.
IOP Conference Series. Earth and Environmental Science ; 1086(1):012047, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2077540

ABSTRACT

Medical Plastic waste is produced in large quantities in India each year, thus recycling it as a constituent in concrete can help to reduce waste disposal. The pandemic of Covid-19 has also resulted in increased production of the PP plastic waste. Because medical plastic wastes are harmful to both the environment and human health, using plastic trash in concrete will help to safeguard both the environment and human health Earlier, different research work were undertaken to figure out safe and feasible methods for plastic waste ejection but with scarce land resources and the threat it has posed to the environment has led us to take a step back and think of safe measures for its safe re-utilization. One such approach is utilization of plastic in concrete manufacturing. With a comparatively longer service life, concrete can act as a safe place for plastic utilization. Plastic wastes are employed as coarse aggregate in concrete in various proportions, and their suitability is tested, the impact of employing plastic waste as coarse aggregate replacement is investigated in this study. As part of the investigation of concrete’s plastic inclusion effect, different experimental research are discussed in this study. The current investigation was carried out on M30 grade concrete, with coarse aggregate replaced with medical PP plastic waste at varied proportions of 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100%. The physical and mechanical properties were comparatively analysed, and the replacement value was optimised. Fresh and hardened concrete qualities were tested and the concrete replacement value for coarse aggregate was optimised at 40% partial replacement of natural coarse aggregate by PP plastic in concrete. Fresh and hardened concrete qualities were tested and analysed.

3.
Chest ; 162(4):A1060, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2060762

ABSTRACT

SESSION TITLE: Issues After COVID-19 Vaccination Case Posters SESSION TYPE: Case Report Posters PRESENTED ON: 10/19/2022 12:45 pm - 01:45 pm INTRODUCTION: Ever since the global introduction of adenovirus-vector COVID-19 vaccines, cases of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis and thrombocytopenia after immunization has been reported, posing a challenge to global effects on vaccine implementation. CASE PRESENTATION: A previously healthy 33 year old male presented to emergency room with altered mental status after a left sided seizure episode at home. Patient had a 1week history of occipital headache after receiving Ad26.COV2·S Johnson and Johnson vaccine 2 weeks prior. MRI showed superior sagittal sinus thrombosis and right high frontal hemorrhage 8.6x4.7x4.9 cm. CT angiography confirmed nearly occlusive thrombosis of superior sagittal sinus with extension to right transverse sinus. Noted to have a hemoglobin of 15, platelet count of 74000, PT/INR 16/1.2 and PTT of 28. Started on intravenous heparin and intubated for GCS of 4. Heparin was stopped due to supra therapeutic PTT of 200 overnight, drop in platelet count to 55 and hemoglobin to 13. Repeat ct head done for change in neurological exam of dilated right pupil, showed frontoparietal hemorrhage 9.3 cmx4.1 cm and 7 mm midline shift. Heparin was reversed with protamine and transfused 1 unit platelets prior to emergent decompressive craniectomy and thrombectomy. Heparin induced platelet antibody and SRA came back positive confirming vaccine induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis. Treatment was initiated with argatroban and IVIG. Platelet count improved with no further propagation of thrombus. Patient underwent feeding tube and tracheostomy placement after 10 days due to prolonged ventilator weaning period and poor mental status. Patient's neurological status continued to improve significantly over subsequent months in acute rehabilitation facility with only residual left sided hemiparesis. Patient was successfully decannulated and anticoagulation switched to apixaban DISCUSSION: Possible pathophysiology is thought to be due to a trigger in spike protein production after biodistribution of adenovirus vaccine and a subsequent autoimmune response resulting in thrombosis. Similar to HIT, platelet consumption leads to thrombocytopenia and the continued platelet and monocyte activation increases thrombin generation, resulting in thrombosis. CDC advices to maintain a high suspicion of cases with symptoms that may indicate an underlying thrombotic event along with simultaneous thrombocytopenia. Heparin use is discouraged, unless HIT testing is negative. The International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis (ISTH), recommend considering non-heparin anticoagulants and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). While platelet transfusions are avoided, rapid progression with rising ICP may necessitate transfusion to enable neurosurgical intervention CONCLUSIONS: Management of complications including seizures and elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) is essential to reduce morbidity and mortality risk. Reference #1: Greinacher A, Thiele T, Warkentin TE, Weisser K, Kyrle PA, Eichinger S. Thrombotic thrombocytopenia after ChAdOx1 nCov-19 vaccination. N Engl J Med 2021;384:2092–101. Reference #2: Muir KL, Kallam A, Koepsell SA, Gundabolu K. Thrombotic thrombocytopenia after Ad26.COV2.S vaccination. N Engl J Med 2021;384:1964–5 Reference #3: Pavord S, Scully M, Hunt BJ, et al. Clinical Features of Vaccine-Induced Immune Thrombocytopenia and Thrombosis. N Engl J Med 2021;385:1680–9 DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Axel Duval No relevant relationships by Nadish Garg No relevant relationships by ARCHANA SREEKANTAN NAIR

4.
Chest ; 162(4):A911-A912, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2060726

ABSTRACT

SESSION TITLE: Critical Care Management of COVID-19 SESSION TYPE: Original Investigations PRESENTED ON: 10/17/2022 01:30 pm - 02:30 pm PURPOSE: Superimposed bacterial co-infection is common among patients with Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pneumonia. Incidence of any superimposed infection ranges from 0% to 40%. Up to 50% of COVID-19 patients who died, had concomitant bacterial or fungal infection. Steroids are recommended for the treatment of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF) due to COVID-19 and are thought to mitigate inflammatory organ injury. This retrospective study explores a subset of COVID-19 patients receiving Epoprostenol (iEPO) for AHRF and compared two different steroid treatment strategies and the impact on patient outcomes. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of 101 COVID-19 patients with AHRF receiving iEPO and systemic steroids. Patients in the high dose steroid group (n=59) received a minimum of dexamethasone 20mg daily or solumedrol 100mg daily while the standard dose steroid group (n=52) were those who received any lower dose. Patients that were DNR/I were excluded from the study. The primary outcome of the study was the rate of bacterial co-infection defined by positive cultures. Secondary outcome was mortality. RESULTS: Results showed that patients treated with high dose steroids were older (66.77±11.17 vs 60.33±14.49, p0.006) and received a longer treatment course (18 days (12-25) vs 12.5 days (10-17), p 0.004). Univariate and Multivariate analysis showed that higher dose steroids were not associated with increased risk of superimposed bacterial infection (OR 0.96, CI (0.34-2.66), p0.93). The duration of steroids, regardless of the dose, was associated with increased risk of superimposed bacterial infection (OR 1.06, CI (1.01-1.13), p0.033). When adjusted for comorbidities and inflammatory state, there was no significant difference in mortality between patients treated with high dose compared to standard dose steroids (OR 3.60, CI (0.65-19.93), p0.14). A longer duration of steroids was associated with a trend towards improved mortality (OR 0.93, CI (0.87-1.00), p0.072). CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that the duration of steroids, rather than dosage, had an effect on patient outcomes. There was no difference in bacterial co-infection rates between the two groups, but infection rates were increased among those who received a longer course of steroid treatment. There was a trend towards lower mortality with increased steroid duration, however, this did not reach statistical significance. Given this trend towards lower mortality, future prospective studies should investigate steroid duration to determine if a longer course of treatment leads to better outcomes in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia and refractory AHRF. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Based on our study, patients should not receive a higher dose or longer duration of steroid treatment given the increased risk of bacterial infection with no definitive improvement in mortality. DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Natasha Garg No relevant relationships by Abhinav Hoskote No relevant relationships by Raymonde Jean No relevant relationships by Arpanjeet Kaur No relevant relationships by Sara Luby No relevant relationships by Omar Mahmoud No relevant relationships by Maria Athena Riego No relevant relationships by Edith Robin No relevant relationships by James Salonia No relevant relationships by DISHANT SHAH No relevant relationships by Venus Sharma No relevant relationships by Elizabeth Zipf

5.
J Acoust Soc Am ; 152(3): 1317, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038220

ABSTRACT

This paper analyzes the impact of second wave of COVID-19 lockdown on environmental noise levels of 25 sites in Delhi city and compares the noise scenario during pre-lockdown, lockdown, and post-lockdown periods. The study utilized the noise monitoring data acquired from 25 real-time ambient noise monitoring stations, installed by the Delhi Pollution Control Committee, Delhi, at various sites throughout Delhi city. A significant reduction of up to 10 and 3 dB(A) in day and night equivalent noise levels, respectively, had been observed during the lockdown period as compared to the pre-lockdown and post-lockdown periods. The study also revealed that only nine sites, including four industrial and five commercial zone sites, complied with the ambient noise standards during lockdown period, and no silence or residential zone sites complied with the ambient noise standards even during the lockdown period. A roadmap for environmental noise management and control is suggested. The study also reports the community's perception toward the change in acoustic environment of Delhi city during the lockdown period by conducting an environmental noise perception survey. The present study should be helpful in devising noise control action plans and policy interventions for environmental noise management and control in the metropolitan city Delhi, India.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cities , Communicable Disease Control , Environmental Monitoring , Humans , Noise/adverse effects
6.
International Journal of Logistics Management ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1992489

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The present study aims to examine the relationship between techno-ethical orientation and ethical decision-making (EDM) in Indian supply chain companies during the COVID-19 pandemic. It also aims to explore the moderating role of technological frames (TF) in the relationship between techno-ethical orientation and EDM. Design/methodology/approach: The relationship between techno-ethical orientation and EDM is examined using correlation and regression analysis. The moderating effect of five dimensions of TFs (personal attitude, application value, organisational influence, supervisor influence and industry influence) is analysed using structural equation modelling. Findings: The correlation coefficient between techno-ethical orientation and EDM is 0.513. Also, the regression coefficient (β = 0.213) is significant at 0.05, establishing a positive linkage between the two. R-square values showed a 45.2% variation in EDM is explained by techno-ethical orientation. Similarly, all variables of TFs have a positive and significant moderating effect on the relationship between techno-ethical orientation and EDM. Originality/value: This is one of the pioneer studies exploring techno-ethical orientation’s impact on EDM in supply chain companies. © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited.

7.
J Minim Access Surg ; 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1975100

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Aerosol protection equipment aim at protecting the anaesthesiologist, from aerosol-borne infections, namely, severe acute respiratory syndrome corona virus-2. METHODS: We improvised the first-generation intubation box (IB) by increasing its dimensions, including heat and moisture exchanger with filter, suction catheter, and attaching arm sleeves to make a modified intubation box (MIB). The impact of IB, MIB and transparent sheets (TS) on the patient outcomes during airway management was evaluated. RESULTS: A significant difference in median (interquartile range in minutes) was observed in time to intubate between IB (4 [4-5]);TS (0.5 [0.3-0.5]) and MIB (0.3 [0.3-1.5]): P = 0.004);and airway devices;McCoy (0.5 [0.3-2]), CMac (0.5 [0.3-1.5]): P = 0.004. First-pass success was 100% with the TS, whereas more than three attempts were required with IB 66.7% and 5.2% with MIB. Video laryngoscope was associated with less airway-related adverse events (ARAEs). The need for mask ventilation (and hence possible aerosolisation) was maximum with IB. All the ARAEs resolved uneventfully. No breach of personal protective equipment was observed;none of the health-care professionals involved in patient care developed any symptoms suggestive of COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Video laryngoscope is favourable for managing airway in COVID-19 times. In view of the ongoing pandemic and added protection that it offers, it is worthwhile to include the MIB in the armamentarium for managing the airway of patients with COVID-19.

8.
Kybernetes ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1713933

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The aim of the current study was to examine the previously unexplored relationship between positive reframing as a mediator between gratitude and technostress in Indian students. By examining this relationship, the authors aim to expand the theoretical domain of gratitude research by examining its potential influence on technology-induced stress. Design/methodology/approach: A cross-sectional survey was used to collect and analyze data from 552 Indian college students who participated in graduate and postgraduate programs across various educational institutions in India. Regression and mediation analyses were performed with both IBM SPSS 25 and AMOS. Findings: This study’s data suggest that positive reframing plays an important mediating role between gratitude and technostress. Gratitude also encourages positive reframing, which reduced technostress among the students. Taken together, our data showed that gratitude induces positive reframing, which in turn reduces techno-stress among Indian students in the current study. Research limitations/implications: The sample size in this study is relatively small in relation to the student population in India. The current study relied primarily on quantitative data and analysis and further research could use a mixed-method approach to better understand the underlying mechanisms between positive reframing, gratitude and technostress. The results are derived under an extreme coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic situation;therefore, the results cannot be generalized to normal times. Practical implications: The paper includes implications for teachers, academic leaders, parents and civil society. Originality/value: Overall, the relationship between positive reframing, gratitude and technostress has not been thoroughly explored. To the best of the authors' understanding, this is the first study to examine the influence of gratitude on technology-induced stress and the role of reframing. © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited.

9.
Blood ; 138:2626, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582154

ABSTRACT

Background: Dysfunction of T cells, NK cells and other immune subsets is common in patients (pts) with CLL. Venetoclax (VEN), a BCL-2 inhibitor and obinutuzumab (OBIN), a CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) are approved for pts with CLL (Fischer, NEJM 2019). Atezolizumab, a PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitor (CPI), is approved for melanoma, lung cancer and other solid tumors. Preclinical studies showed synergy of VEN and CD20 mAb with CPI (Kohlhapp, Cancer Discovery 2021;Westin, Lancet Oncology 2014). Clinical studies showed activity of PD1 inhibition in pts with Richter's transformation, but not CLL (Ding, Blood 2017;Jain, ASH 2018). To our knowledge, no prior study has evaluated PD-L1 inhibition in pts with CLL, nor combined CPI, VEN and OBIN. We hypothesized that combined VEN, OBIN and atezolizumab will be synergistic. Methods: This is an investigator-initiated Phase II trial of combined VEN, OBIN and atezolizumab in pts with previously untreated CLL meeting 2008 IWCLL treatment criteria (NCT02846623). Eligibility criteria included age ≥18 years, adequate organ function (total bilirubin ≤1.5 x ULN, ALT and AST ≤2.5 x ULN, creatinine ≤1.5 x ULN). OBIN was given at a flat dose of 100mg IV Cycle (C)1 Day (D)1, 900 mg C1D2, 1000mg on C1D8, 1000mg on C1D15 and then 1000mg on C2-9 D1. Atezolizumab was given at a flat dose of 1680 mg IV (split over 2 days) on C1D3-4 and then C2-9D1-2. VEN was initiated at the start of C3 with the weekly dose-escalation (20mg daily to a target dose of 400mg daily) and continued daily until end of C14 (total 12 cycles of VEN). All pts stopped therapy at the end of C14. Response assessments were done with CT imaging and bone marrow aspirate/biopsy with MRD assessment (multi-color flow cytometry;sensitivity 10 -4) at the end of C2 (prior to VEN initiation), end of C6, end of C9, and end of C14. Results: From July 2019 to December 2020, a total of 26 pts were enrolled. The median age was 60 years (range, 21-74). The baseline characteristics are shown in Table 1. A total of 19/26 (73%) had unmutated IGHV gene. Though the study did not restrict pts with del(17p) or mutated TP53, no pt in the current cohort had del(17p)/ mutated TP53. A total of 14 (54%) pts had a baseline lymph node >5cm. The median follow-up is 13.3 months. One pt came off study in C1 (details below). A total of 25 pts initiated VEN. The TLS risk categories at the start of C1 were high (n=9, 36%), medium (n=12, 48%), and low (n=4, 16%). After 2 cycles of OBIN and atezolizumab (prior to VEN initiation), the majority of pts had downgrading of TLS risk category [high (n=2, 8%), medium (n=3, 12%), and low (n=20, 80%)]. After C6 (about 3 cycles of VEN 400mg daily), bone marrow undetectable (U)-MRD rate was 19/25 (76%);4/25 (16%) had low+ MRD and 2/25 (8%) had high+ MRD. After C9 (about 6 cycles of VEN 400mg daily), among the 21 pts (4 pts have not reached this time-point), the bone marrow U-MRD rate was 18/21 (86%);2/21 (10%) had low+ MRD and 1/21 (5%) had high+ MRD. A total of 14 pts completed C14 (9 pts have not reached this time-point;2 pts came off study prior to completing C14, details below);13/14 (93%) achieved bone marrow U-MRD and 1/14 (7%) has low+ MRD. No patient had disease progression or MRD relapse so far. One pt died (details below). Three pts came off study (one developed retroperitoneal hematoma after receiving enoxaparin for DVT in C1;one developed CPI-induced colitis and removed from the study in C10;one died from COVID-19 pneumonia in C14 while in bone marrow U-MRD remission). Grade 3-4 neutropenia occurred in 14/26 (54%) pts. Grade 3 thrombocytopenia occurred in 5/26 (19%) pts;no pt had G4 thrombocytopenia. A total of 4 pts developed CPI-induced toxicities (colitis, G3, n=1;mucositis, G3, n=1;nephritis, G2, n=1;myositis, G2, n=1). A total of 10/25 (40%) pts had dose reduction of VEN, the majority due to neutropenia. Atezolizumab was discontinued early in 3 pts due to CPI-induced toxicities. Laboratory correlative studies including scRNAseq and CyTOF are ongoing. Conclusions: Treatment with combined VE , OBIN and atezolizumab leads to high rate of early U-MRD remission with 76% bone marrow U-MRD remission at the end of C6 (about 3 cycles of VEN 400mg daily). Four pts had CPI-induced toxicities. The enrollment in this trial continues and updated data and correlative studies will be presented at the ASH meeting. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Jain: Pfizer: Research Funding;Bristol Myers Squibb: Honoraria, Research Funding;Precision Biosciences: Honoraria, Research Funding;Aprea Therapeutics: Research Funding;AstraZeneca: Honoraria, Research Funding;Servier: Honoraria, Research Funding;Incyte: Research Funding;Pharmacyclics: Research Funding;Genentech: Honoraria, Research Funding;AbbVie: Honoraria, Research Funding;TG Therapeutics: Honoraria;Janssen: Honoraria;Beigene: Honoraria;Fate Therapeutics: Research Funding;Adaptive Biotechnologies: Honoraria, Research Funding;Cellectis: Honoraria, Research Funding;ADC Therapeutics: Honoraria, Research Funding. Ferrajoli: Janssen: Other: Advisory Board;AstraZeneca: Other: Advisory Board, Research Funding;BeiGene: Other: Advisory Board, Research Funding. Yilmaz: Daiichi-Sankyo: Research Funding;Pfizer: Research Funding. Thompson: AbbVie: Other: Institution: Advisory/Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Grant/Funding;Gilead: Other: Institution: Advisory/Consultancy, Honoraria;Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria;Pharmacyclics: Other: Institution: Advisory/Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Grant/Funding;Adaptive Biotechnologies: Other: Institution: Advisory/Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Grant/Funding, Expert Testimony;Genentech: Other: Institution: Advisory/Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Grant/Funding;Amgen: Other: Institution: Honoraria, Research Grant/Funding. Konopleva: Novartis: Other: research funding pending, Patents & Royalties: intellectual property rights;Reata Pharmaceuticals: Current holder of stock options in a privately-held company, Patents & Royalties: intellectual property rights;Eli Lilly: Patents & Royalties: intellectual property rights, Research Funding;KisoJi: Research Funding;Stemline Therapeutics: Research Funding;Sanofi: Other: grant support, Research Funding;Rafael Pharmaceuticals: Other: grant support, Research Funding;AstraZeneca: Other: grant support, Research Funding;Cellectis: Other: grant support;F. Hoffmann-La Roche: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: grant support;Calithera: Other: grant support, Research Funding;Ascentage: Other: grant support, Research Funding;Ablynx: Other: grant support, Research Funding;Genentech: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: grant support, Research Funding;Forty Seven: Other: grant support, Research Funding;AbbVie: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Grant Support, Research Funding;Agios: Other: grant support, Research Funding. Neelapu: Takeda Pharmaceuticals and related to cell therapy: Patents & Royalties;Kite, a Gilead Company, Bristol Myers Squibb, Merck, Poseida, Cellectis, Celgene, Karus Therapeutics, Unum Therapeutics (Cogent Biosciences), Allogene, Precision BioSciences, Acerta and Adicet Bio: Research Funding;Kite, a Gilead Company, Merck, Bristol Myers Squibb, Novartis, Celgene, Pfizer, Allogene, Kuur, Incyte, Precision BioSciences, Legend, Adicet Bio, Calibr, and Unum Therapeutics: Other: personal fees;Kite, a Gilead Company, Merck, Bristol Myers Squibb, Novartis, Celgene, Pfizer, Allogene Therapeutics, Cell Medica/Kuur, Incyte, Precision Biosciences, Legend Biotech, Adicet Bio, Calibr, Unum Therapeutics and Bluebird Bio: Honoraria. Takahashi: Symbio Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Celgene/BMS: Consultancy;Novartis: Consultancy;GSK: Consultancy. Burger: TG Therapeutics: Other: Travel/Accommodations/Expenses, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau;Beigene: Research Funding, Speakers Bureau;Novartis: Other: Travel/Accommodations/Expenses, Speakers Bureau;Pharmacyclics LLC: Consultancy, Other: Travel/Accommodations/Expenses, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau;Gilead: Consultancy, Other: Travel/Accommodations/Expenses, Rese rch Funding, Speakers Bureau;AstraZeneca: Consultancy;Janssen: Consultancy, Other: Travel/Accommodations/Expenses, Speakers Bureau. Khoury: Stemline Therapeutics: Research Funding;Kiromic: Research Funding;Angle: Research Funding. Kantarjian: Jazz: Research Funding;NOVA Research: Honoraria;Novartis: Honoraria, Research Funding;KAHR Medical Ltd: Honoraria;Precision Biosciences: Honoraria;Amgen: Honoraria, Research Funding;Astra Zeneca: Honoraria;AbbVie: Honoraria, Research Funding;Ipsen Pharmaceuticals: Honoraria;Pfizer: Honoraria, Research Funding;Astellas Health: Honoraria;Aptitude Health: Honoraria;Taiho Pharmaceutical Canada: Honoraria;Immunogen: Research Funding;Daiichi-Sankyo: Research Funding;BMS: Research Funding;Ascentage: Research Funding. Wierda: Karyopharm: Research Funding;Miragen: Research Funding;Acerta Pharma Inc.: Research Funding;Cyclacel: Research Funding;Oncternal Therapeutics, Inc.: Research Funding;Pharmacyclics LLC, an AbbVie Company: Research Funding;Sunesis: Research Funding;Juno Therapeutics: Research Funding;Gilead Sciences: Research Funding;AstraZeneca: Research Funding;Genentech: Research Funding;Loxo Oncology, Inc.: Research Funding;Janssen: Research Funding;Xencor: Research Funding;GSK/Novartis: Research Funding;KITE Pharma: Research Funding;Genzyme Corporation: Consultancy;AbbVie: Research Funding. OffLabel Disclosure: Atezolizumab is not approved for CLL

10.
Blood ; 138:3720, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582144

ABSTRACT

Background: Ibrutinib (IBR) and venetoclax (VEN) combination is a highly effective therapy for patients (pts) with CLL (Jain, NEJM 2019;Wierda, ASH 2020;Kater, EHA 2021). We previously reported results of the first-line cohort of a phase II trial of combined IBR and VEN for high-risk pts with CLL (Jain, NEJM 2019;Jain, JAMA Oncology 2021). Here we report updated data for these pts with focus on MRD. Methods: Pts with previously untreated CLL meeting IWCLL treatment criteria were enrolled. All pts had at least one high-risk feature: del(17p), mutated TP53, del(11q), unmutated IGHV, or age ≥65 years (yrs). Pts received IBR 420 mg daily for 3 cycles followed by addition of VEN (weekly dose-escalation to 400mg daily). Combined therapy was given for 24 cycles (28 days/cycle). Pts with bone marrow (BM) undetectable MRD (U-MRD) (flow cytometry;sensitivity 10 -4) at 24 cycles of combined therapy discontinued both VEN and IBR;MRD+ pts continued IBR. A trial amendment allowed an additional 12 cycles of combined VEN and ibrutinib for pts who remained BM MRD+ after Cycle 24. Response assessments were performed using BM and CT imaging studies (2008 IWCLL criteria). U-MRD was defined as <0.01%;low MRD+ 0.01% to <1%;high MRD+ ≥1%. Progression-free survival (PFS) was assessed as the time from the start of study drug to CLL progression, Richter transformation, or death from any cause. Blood MRD was monitored every 6 months in pts off treatment or on ibrutinib monotherapy beyond 24 cycles of combined treatment. Results: A total of 80 pts were enrolled. Baseline characteristics are shown in Table 1. The median follow-up was 44.1 months. Five pts came off study during 1 st 3 cycles of IBR monotherapy;75 pts initiated VEN. We previously reported that after 12 cycles of the combination, 45/80 (56%) achieved BM U-MRD remission;24/80 (30%) were BM MRD-positive (low MRD+, n=19;high MRD+, n=5). After 24 cycles of the combination, 53/80 (66%) achieved BM U-MRD remission;14/80 (17%) were BM MRD+ (low MRD+, n=13;high MRD+, n=1). Overall, 60/80 (75%) achieved BM U-MRD as the best response. Updated PFS is provided in Figure 1. Of the 53 pts who were BM U-MRD at the end of cycle 24 of the combination, 52 pts had a subsequent blood MRD assessment done in follow-up (1 missed due to COVID-19);51/53 discontinued all therapy, 2 pts continued IBR per treatment physician discretion. With a median time of 18.4 months post Cycle 24, 8 pts had recurrence of blood MRD (defined as MRD ≥ 0.01% in 2 consecutive visits) in follow-up with 1 pt with CLL progression. The sole pt with CLL progression had mutated IGHV with del(11q) and NOTCH1 mutation. The pt had delayed achievement of BM U-MRD with the pt achieving U-MRD for the first time at the end of Cycle 24 of combined therapy. She was noted to have disease progression 22 months off therapy;BTK or PLCG2 mutation were not detected and the patient is currently in clinical remission on acalabrutinib. The time to MRD conversion for these 53 pts is shown in Figure 2. There were 14 pts who were BM MRD+ at the end of cycle 24 of the combination (low MRD+, n=13;high MRD+, n=1). The only pt with high-MRD+ at end of cycle 24 was noted to have Richter transformation at that time. The remaining 13 pts (all low MRD+ in BM, range 0.01-0.56%) continued IBR monotherapy. With a recent trial amendment, MRD+ pts after Cycle 24 could get 12 additional cycles of venetoclax;9/13 pts have resumed VEN. 6/9 pts have achieved U-MRD remission. 2 pts had Richter transformation and 3 pts have died (Jain, JAMA Oncology 2021). Conclusions: We report long term follow-up of combined IBR and VEN in first-line CLL. Remissions were durable with some pts having recurrence of blood MRD in follow-up, which may be an early indicator of relapse. In a small subset of the pts with BM MRD+ disease at 24 cycles of combined therapy, additional VEN appears to lead to U-MRD remission in majority of the pts. Whether this will lead to improved long-term PFS remains to be determined. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Jain: TG Therapeutics: Honoraria;Beigene: Honoraria;Janssen: Honoraria;Fate Therapeutics: Research Funding;Aprea Therapeutics: Research Funding;Precision Biosciences: Honoraria, Research Funding;Incyte: Research Funding;Adaptive Biotechnologies: Honoraria, Research Funding;Cellectis: Honoraria, Research Funding;ADC Therapeutics: Honoraria, Research Funding;Servier: Honoraria, Research Funding;Pfizer: Research Funding;Bristol Myers Squibb: Honoraria, Research Funding;AstraZeneca: Honoraria, Research Funding;Genentech: Honoraria, Research Funding;AbbVie: Honoraria, Research Funding;Pharmacyclics: Research Funding. Thompson: AbbVie: Other: Institution: Advisory/Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Grant/Funding;Amgen: Other: Institution: Honoraria, Research Grant/Funding;Genentech: Other: Institution: Advisory/Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Grant/Funding;Adaptive Biotechnologies: Other: Institution: Advisory/Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Grant/Funding, Expert Testimony;Pharmacyclics: Other: Institution: Advisory/Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Grant/Funding;Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria;Gilead: Other: Institution: Advisory/Consultancy, Honoraria. Ferrajoli: BeiGene: Other: Advisory Board, Research Funding;Janssen: Other: Advisory Board;AstraZeneca: Other: Advisory Board, Research Funding. Burger: Novartis: Other: Travel/Accommodations/Expenses, Speakers Bureau;TG Therapeutics: Other: Travel/Accommodations/Expenses, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau;Janssen: Consultancy, Other: Travel/Accommodations/Expenses, Speakers Bureau;Beigene: Research Funding, Speakers Bureau;Pharmacyclics LLC: Consultancy, Other: Travel/Accommodations/Expenses, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau;Gilead: Consultancy, Other: Travel/Accommodations/Expenses, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau;AstraZeneca: Consultancy. Borthakur: GSK: Consultancy;ArgenX: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center: Current Employment;Protagonist: Consultancy;Novartis: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Astex: Research Funding;Ryvu: Research Funding;Takeda: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Takahashi: Symbio Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Novartis: Consultancy;Celgene/BMS: Consultancy;GSK: Consultancy. Sasaki: Daiichi-Sankyo: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Pfizer: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Novartis: Consultancy, Research Funding. Kadia: Cellonkos: Other;Aglos: Consultancy;Dalichi Sankyo: Consultancy;AbbVie: Consultancy, Other: Grant/research support;BMS: Other: Grant/research support;Amgen: Other: Grant/research support;Cure: Speakers Bureau;Jazz: Consultancy;Genentech: Consultancy, Other: Grant/research support;Liberum: Consultancy;Novartis: Consultancy;Pfizer: Consultancy, Other;Pulmotech: Other;Sanofi-Aventis: Consultancy;AstraZeneca: Other;Astellas: Other;Genfleet: Other;Ascentage: Other. Konopleva: Sanofi: Other: grant support, Research Funding;Cellectis: Other: grant support;Calithera: Other: grant support, Research Funding;KisoJi: Research Funding;Agios: Other: grant support, Research Funding;Ascentage: Other: grant support, Research Funding;AbbVie: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Grant Support, Research Funding;Ablynx: Other: grant support, Research Funding;Stemline Therapeutics: Research Funding;Eli Lilly: Patents & Royalties: intellectual property rights, Research Funding;AstraZeneca: Other: grant support, Research Funding;Rafael Pharmaceuticals: Other: grant support, Research Funding;Genentech: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: grant support, Research Funding;F. Hoffmann-La Roche: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: grant support;Forty Seven: Other: grant support, Research Funding;Novartis: Other: research funding pending, Patents & Royalties: intellectual property rights;Reata Pharmaceuticals: Current holder of stock options in a privately-held company, Patents & Royalties: intellectual property rights. Alvarado: BerGenBio: Research Funding;Jazz Pharmaceuticals: Research Funding;Astex Pharmaceuticals: Research Funding;Sun Pharma: Consultancy, Research Funding;MEI Pharma: Research Funding;FibroGen: Research Funding;Daiichi-Sankyo: Research Funding;CytomX Therapeutics: Consultancy. Yilmaz: Pfizer: Research Funding;Daiichi-Sankyo: Research Funding. DiNardo: Notable Labs: Current holder of stock options in a privately-held company, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Novartis: Honoraria;Takeda: Honoraria;Celgene, a Bristol Myers Squibb company: Honoraria, Research Funding;Forma: Honoraria, Research Funding;AbbVie: Consultancy, Research Funding;GlaxoSmithKline: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Bristol Myers Squibb: Honoraria, Research Funding;ImmuneOnc: Honoraria, Research Funding;Agios/Servier: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Foghorn: Honoraria, Research Funding. Bose: Kartos Therapeutics: Honoraria, Research Funding;Sierra Oncology: Honoraria;Novartis: Honoraria;Constellation Pharmaceuticals: Research Funding;NS Pharma: Research Funding;Celgene Corporation: Honoraria, Research Funding;Blueprint Medicines: Honoraria, Research Funding;Pfizer: Research Funding;Promedior: Research Funding;Astellas: Research Funding;Incyte Corporation: Honoraria, Research Funding;BMS: Honoraria, Research Funding;CTI BioPharma: Honoraria, Research Funding. Pemmaraju: Blueprint Medicines: Consultancy;LFB Biotechnologies: Consultancy;Novartis Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy, Other: Research Support, Research Funding;ASCO Leukemia Advisory Panel: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Dan's House of Hope: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisorycommittees;Roche Diagnostics: Consultancy;MustangBio: Consultancy, Other;Affymetrix: Consultancy, Research Funding;Samus: Other, Research Funding;ImmunoGen, Inc: Consultancy;ASH Communications Committee: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Aptitude Health: Consultancy;Plexxicon: Other, Research Funding;Springer Science + Business Media: Other;Protagonist Therapeutics, Inc.: Consultancy;HemOnc Times/Oncology Times: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Clearview Healthcare Partners: Consultancy;Abbvie Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Other, Research Funding;CareDx, Inc.: Consultancy;Sager Strong Foundation: Other;Daiichi Sankyo, Inc.: Other, Research Funding;Incyte: Consultancy;Stemline Therapeutics, Inc.: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Other, Research Funding;Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.: Consultancy;DAVA Oncology: Consultancy;Pacylex Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy;Celgene Corporation: Consultancy;Cellectis S.A. ADR: Other, Research Funding. Jabbour: Amgen, AbbVie, Spectrum, BMS, Takeda, Pfizer, Adaptive, Genentech: Research Funding. Wang: Stemline Therapeutics: Honoraria. Kantarjian: Taiho Pharmaceutical Canada: Honoraria;Precision Biosciences: Honoraria;Immunogen: Research Funding;Daiichi-Sankyo: Research Funding;Jazz: Research Funding;BMS: Research Funding;AbbVie: Honoraria, Research Funding;Pfizer: Honoraria, Research Funding;Novartis: Honoraria, Research Funding;NOVA Research: Honoraria;KAHR Medical Ltd: Honoraria;Ipsen Pharmaceuticals: Honoraria;Astra Zeneca: Honoraria;Astellas Health: Honoraria;Aptitude Health: Honoraria;Amgen: Honoraria, Research Funding;Ascentage: Research Funding. Wierda: Juno Therapeutics: Research Funding;AstraZeneca: Research Funding;Xencor: Research Funding;Janssen: Research Funding;Loxo Oncology, Inc.: Research Funding;Cyclacel: Research Funding;Oncternal Therapeutics, Inc.: Research Funding;Miragen: Research Funding;KITE Pharma: Research Funding;Sunesis: Research Funding;Gilead Sciences: Research Funding;Acerta Pharma Inc.: Rese rch Funding;Pharmacyclics LLC, an AbbVie Company: Research Funding;Karyopharm: Research Funding;Genentech: Research Funding;GSK/Novartis: Research Funding;Genzyme Corporation: Consultancy;AbbVie: Research Funding. OffLabel Disclosure: The combination of ibrutinib and venetoclax is not FDA approved

12.
Chest ; 160(4):A2152, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1466198

ABSTRACT

TOPIC: Pulmonary Physiology TYPE: Fellow Case Reports INTRODUCTION: Respiratory muscle weakness is known to occur in neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington's disease (HD), and causes 25% of deaths in this population. Though diaphragmatic dystonia has been described in some neurodegenerative diseases, it has not been in HD. In general, little published data exists on overall respiratory function and diaphragmatic movement in HD. CASE PRESENTATION: We describe a 58-year-old male with HD, presenting with progressive dyspnea over 1 year and an accompanying choking sensation upon awakening. Cardiac evaluation with echocardiogram and dobutamine stress test revealed only left ventricular hypertrophy. Family history includes HD in his mother, diagnosed at autopsy age 72;an older brother with HD onset at 53 that died at 62;a maternal aunt with onset in her 50s that died in her 70s. His maternal grandmother and 2 other family members also had involuntary movements believed to be chorea. Most died from respiratory complications. Physical exam showed adequate air entry bilaterally, with clear breath sounds and decreased chest wall expansion. No abdominal paradox or diaphragm dysfunction was appreciated in supine or seated position. On walking oximetry, he became tachypneic and dyspneic after 2 minutes of walking, prompting him to stop. His saturation on room air did not drop below 96%. Heart rate increased to 110 beats per minute. Laboratory panel revealed hemoglobin 13.8 g/dl. A venous blood gas revealed pH 7.38 and pCO2 of 49.A dynamic digital chest radiography (DDR) was performed during two tidal breaths and a forced inspiratory and expiratory maneuver. This revealed decreased bilateral lung inflation. Diaphragmatic contours were elevated bilaterally with a mildly reduced excursion. During the breathing cycle multiple independent diaphragmatic contractions were appreciated on forced inspiration and exhalation resulting in paradoxical motion and dyssynchrony. There was exaggerated use of accessory muscles in the shoulder girdle as a compensatory mechanism. Spasms in the upper airway were also noted throughout the test. Because of covid restrictions, the patient is awaiting pulmonary function tests. DISCUSSION: DDR uniquely provides the opportunity to interrogate respiratory physiology and identify diaphragmatic abnormalities, such as coordination impairments and dyssynchrony compared to static chest radiography;with lower levels of radiation as used in video fluoroscopy. As previously described1, we suggest that the understanding of dyspnea in patients with neurologic disease is enhanced using DDR. CONCLUSIONS: We report the first case of diaphragmatic chorea in a patient with HD using DDR. Future studies are needed to better understand this newly recognized phenomenon of diaphragmatic discoordination and its association with shortness of breath. REFERENCE #1: O'Sullivan M, Singh A, Prime D, Moore J, Zink S. A Whole New Chest X-Ray. ATS 2019 ePoster Viewing Site. Published May 2019. Accessed April 28, 2021. https://cslide-us.ctimeetingtech.com/ats2019_eposter/attendee/eposter/poster/6529 DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Norma Braun, source=Web Response No relevant relationships by Jose Concepcion, source=Web Response No relevant relationships by Natasha Garg, source=Web Response No relevant relationships by Mary O Sullivan, source=Web Response No relevant relationships by Valeria Santibanez, source=Web Response

13.
AMIA ... Annual Symposium Proceedings/AMIA Symposium ; 2021:112-121, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377200

ABSTRACT

Several studies have shown that COVID-19 patients with prior comorbidities have a higher risk for adverse outcomes, resulting in a disproportionate impact on older adults and minorities that fit that profile. However, although there is considerable heterogeneity in the comorbidity profiles of these populations, not much is known about how prior comorbidities co-occur to form COVID-19 patient subgroups, and their implications for targeted care. Here we used bipartite networks to quantitatively and visually analyze heterogeneity in the comorbidity profiles of COVID-19 inpatients, based on electronic health records from 12 hospitals and 60 clinics in the greater Minneapolis region. This approach enabled the analysis and interpretation of heterogeneity at three levels of granularity (cohort, subgroup, and patient), each of which enabled clinicians to rapidly translate the results into the design of clinical interventions. We discuss future extensions of the multigranular heterogeneity framework, and conclude by exploring how the framework could be used to analyze other biomedical phenomena including symptom clusters and molecular phenotypes, with the goal of accelerating translation to targeted clinical care.

14.
EAI/Springer Innovations in Communication and Computing ; : 203-229, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1231882

ABSTRACT

Due to the outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic, there exists a situation of worldwide/nationwide lockdown across different countries which results in the growth of new-age technologies including augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) and their demands. Lockdown situation and social distancing had given sufficient time to develop innovative ideas by using AR/VR technologies. Many global seminars or conferences had been cancelled to practice social distancing and adopt the AR/VR technologies. The consequences of COVID-19 pandemic such as uncertain prognoses and shortages of resources had led to an increase in the depression level among people. This chapter demonstrates the applications of AR/VR and its proposed methodology to integrate the benefits of VR to the standardized mental health treatment process of mental health issues such as depression. The need for effective diagnosis and treatment of mental health combined with the recent advancement of artificial intelligence technologies had led to an increase in explorations in this direction. Deep learning has potentially discovered new learning patterns on the human-machine interface to identify risk factors of mental illness as well as to give optimized therapies. © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2021.

15.
Journal of Interdisciplinary Mathematics ; 24(2):285-297, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1158788
16.
South Dakota medicine : the journal of the South Dakota State Medical Association ; 73(12):569-571, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1148445

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causing COVID-19 utilizes the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE-2) receptor of cells in order to gain entry and continue infection. Recent literature has focused on acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and other associated pulmonary complications;however, only a scarce amount of literature exists on neurological complications. Such complications also pose a high morbidity in these patients. The exact pathogenesis of nervous system involvement by COVID-19 still remains poorly understood. The aim of this article is to review the neurological symptoms seen in COVID-19 infection and discuss the probable pathogenesis, management and outcome of associated neurological complications. Copyright© South Dakota State Medical Association.

17.
S D Med ; 73(12):569-571, 2020.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1119742

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causing COVID-19 utilizes the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE-2) receptor of cells in order to gain entry and continue infection. Recent literature has focused on acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and other associated pulmonary complications;however, only a scarce amount of literature exists on neurological complications. Such complications also pose a high morbidity in these patients. The exact pathogenesis of nervous system involvement by COVID-19 still remains poorly understood. The aim of this article is to review the neurological symptoms seen in COVID-19 infection and discuss the probable pathogenesis, management and outcome of associated neurological complications.

18.
Journal of The Institution of Engineers (India): Series B ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1107904

ABSTRACT

Today world is going through a critical phase. The whole world is infected from the coronavirus [COVID 19]. In India also the number of new cases keeps on increasing. In this paper, the machine learning model has been developed using time series analysis (ARIMA model) for predicting the new cases in India in the next coming days. In this work, results are also compared with the predictive values generated from the ARIMA and AR model and concluded that the ARIMA model is the best fit model as compared to AR model for predicting the new cases in India. Python programming language has been used for implementation. The dataset from January 1, 2020 to July 31, 2020 has been taken for analysis. This paper is useful for researchers for further analysis of COVID-19 pandemic in India. © 2021, The Institution of Engineers (India).

19.
Indian Journal of Community Health ; 32(4):659-664, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1100578

ABSTRACT

Background: The prevalence of violence against Health Care Workers (HCW) is showing a rising trend. Various studies have been done in the recent past shows that the prevalence of violence against HCW s ranged from 27.4% to 67%. The present study was done to compare and analyze the underlying causes of violence against HCW in a Non COVID and COVID situation to identify the commonality if any, and to suggest any remedial measures. Methodology: This was cross-sectional analytical design and was carried out in inpatient care areas of a tertiary care hospital. The study subjects comprised of Doctors, Nurses, Group C employees. Data was collected using direct interview method on a standard questionnaire. In addition, various media reports were collected and analyzed through internet. Results: Maximum incidents were experienced in emergency and OPD, where staff patient's ratio is less. 39.4% incidents were experienced by the staff who were providing care to the Terminally ill patients, Mentally and Physically disabled persons & Psychiatric patients. Suggestion which emerged to reduce WPV are, triage in casualty, availability of trained security guards, CCTV, restricted visiting hours and limited attendants with the patients, improvement in patient amenities etc. Whereas in COVID situation the major reason is the religious and social belief, poor dietary services and lack of hygiene and sanitation. Conclusion: There is an urgent and inescapable requirement that the healthcare administrators should address the underlying precipitating factors of violence, for delivery of quality healthcare services to the patients in a safe environment.

20.
Journal of Cardiac Critical Care ; 4(1):56-60, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-990058

ABSTRACT

The novel COVID-19 disease mainly affects respiratory organs;however, involvement of cardiovascular system is also not uncommon. Cardiac involvement can manifest as myocarditis, heart failure, myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, or arrhythmias in COVID-19 patients. This novel Coronavirus enters into the cells of the human body by binding to ACE-2 receptors which are predominantly present on pneumocytes and cardiomyocytes. The damage to myocardium is manifested by the increase in cardiac enzymes such as troponin-I, CK-MB, and NT pro-BNP. Although echocardiogram is an important tool in the cardiac evaluation of COVID-19 patients, its indiscriminate use is discouraged, owing to the risk of transmission to echocardiography service providers, as well as possible risk of contaminating echocardiography equipment. In this article, we discuss the different mechanisms and cardiac manifestations of COVID-19. We also review the current guidelines for echocardiography evaluation of COVID-19 patients as well as current recommendations on safety of echocardiography personnel and equipment against contamination. We also include our experience of two cases in which COVID-19 affliction of heart was strongly suspected, and echocardiography clinched the diagnosis.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL