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1.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg Glob Res Rev ; 6(1)2022 01 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639304

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: When the COVID-19 pandemic forced the cancellation of visiting subinternships, we pivoted to create a virtual orthopaedic rotation (VOR). The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of the VOR on the residency selection process and determine the role of such a rotation in the future. METHODS: A committee was convened to create a VOR to replace visiting orthopaedic rotations for medical students who are interested in pursuing a career in orthopaedic surgery. The VOR was reviewed and sanctioned by our medical school, but no academic credit was granted. We conducted three 3-week VOR sessions. During each session, virtual rotators participated in regularly scheduled educational conferences and attended an invitation-only daily conference in the evenings that was designed for a medical student audience. In addition, students were paired with faculty and resident mentors in a structured mentorship program. Students' orthopaedic knowledge was assessed using prerotation and postrotation tests. RESULTS: From July to September 2020, 61 students from 37 distinct medical schools participated in the VOR. Notable improvements were observed in prerotation and postrotation orthopaedic knowledge test scores. In postrotation surveys, both students and faculty expressed high satisfaction with the curriculum but less certainty about how well they got to know each other. In the subsequent residency application cycle, 27.9% of the students who participated in the VOR were selected to interview, compared with 8.7% of the total application pool. DISCUSSION: The VOR was a valuable substitute for in-person clinical rotations during the COVID-19 pandemic. Although not likely to be a replacement for conventional away rotations, the VOR is a possible adjunct to in-person clinical rotations in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Orthopedics , Humans , Orthopedics/education , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Journal of Young Pharmacists ; 13(2):91-96, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1346681

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus was renamed as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) by the world health organization, began its spread in December 2019, in the city of Wuhan, China. Global bodies and governments weren't prepared to handle the impact of the virus on society. Nepal's landlocked nation encountered its incident confirmed case of COVID-19 during the first week of January, with the primary host being a student with a travel history from its place of inception. The nation is deficient in its health resources. The country mainly focused on the stringent implementation of washing of hands, wearing masks, restricting general movement, and maintaining social distancing in public. The disease transmission reached to the third stage, which began within three months after the confirmation of the first case of COVID-19. The lack of tropical hospitals, laboratory and diagnostic facilities added to the challenges faced by the country. This paper is a comprehensive review of the overall preparation and steps taken by the federal system of Nepal to combat the virus's effects till the third stage of transmission. It concludes with the practical limitations faced by the governing authorities of the nation while implementing these measures.

3.
J Surg Educ ; 78(5): 1629-1636, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1071726

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The Haitian Annual Assembly of Orthopaedic Trauma (HAAOT) is an annual continuing medical education (CME) conference for Haitian orthopedists and trainees converted to a pilot virtual format in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. We evaluated this virtual format's effectiveness at teaching, facilitating bilingual discussion, and encouraging cross-cultural exchange of experiences - all aimed at improving orthopedic knowledge in a low-resource country like Haiti. DESIGN: Planned collaboratively between North American and Haitian colleagues, the conference involved 4 bilingual weekly Zoom meetings comprised of 4 to 6 prerecorded presentations and live-translated discussion. Pre- and postmeeting knowledge assessments in French (Haitian language of medical instruction) were administered weekly with results compared via 2-sample t-tests. An online postconference survey evaluated attendee satisfaction with the virtual format. SETTING: Virtual. PARTICIPANTS: Weekly attendance involved approximately 50 Haitian orthopedists and trainees, with 20 to 25 completing pre- and postmeeting assessments. RESULTS: Statistically significant increases between pre/post scores were seen during 3 of 4 sessions. Session-wide significant score increases occurred for residents and attending surgeons with <10 years of experience. 85.7% of attendees reported the virtual platform exceeded expectations and 100% indicated likely or extremely likely participation in further virtual events. CONCLUSIONS: The pilot virtual HAAOT was extremely well received with high desire for future sessions. Beyond short-term knowledge retention among attendees, nonmeasurable benefits included collaboration between orthopedists and trainees in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Haiti, and Burkina Faso. As COVID-19 spurs online learning in high-income nations, the successful low-resource context adjustments and local partnership underlying this model attest that travel restrictions need not impede delivery of virtual CME conferences in lower-income nations. Attendee learning and the decreased cost and travel requirements allude to this platform's sustainability and reproducibility in facilitating future international education and capacity building. Further studies will assess long-term retention of presented material.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Orthopedics , Clinical Competence , Education, Medical, Continuing , Haiti , Humans , Orthopedics/education , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg ; 28(17): e735-e743, 2020 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640548

ABSTRACT

The emergence of COVID-19 as a viral pandemic in early 2020 resulted in notable changes to the daily practice, workflow, and education of orthopaedic residencies internationally. In particular, social distancing, residency restructuring, and redeployment to other services has increased heterogeneity in schedules and made the in-person gathering of trainees for education increasingly challenging. These changes may last until 2024 based on some mathematical models, resulting in notable disruptions to orthopaedic education, especially for junior residents. Therefore, in this study, we describe how we converted our in-person PGY-1 skills course into a "virtual" boot camp based on validated training modules and existing American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons guidelines. Lessons learned from the experience and potential areas for improvement in the use of newer technology to teach cognitive knowledge and skills modules are highlighted with the hope that this can be useful to other orthopaedic residency programs, during the pandemic and also beyond.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/methods , Orthopedic Procedures/education , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Virtual Reality , Adult , COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Curriculum , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/trends , Male , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient-Specific Modeling , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology
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