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1.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-311094

ABSTRACT

The patients’ discouragement from presentation due to the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the progression of many manageable diseases to a critical condition. we report a case of carbuncle promotion to the necrotizing fasciitis in the context of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and delay in visiting physicians due to fear of COVID-19.

2.
Skin appendage disorders ; : 1-5, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1668463

ABSTRACT

Introduction The pandemic of COVID-19 has several implications for patients with chronic stress-sensitive diseases such as alopecia areata (AA). On the other hand, the vulnerability of AA patients using immunosuppressives to a more severe infection is in the shadow of ambiguity. This teledermatology study aimed to evaluate the course and outcome of AA in patients during this challenging period. Methods Patients with AA who had previously received systemic therapy included in this study. Information about demographic data, AA history, characteristics, and treatments, hair loss progression, Corona Disease Anxiety Scale (CDAS), adherence to protective measures against the COVID-19, possible infection, and its features obtained via a telephone call. Results A total of 57 patients participated. The majority (84.2%) of the participants had mild anxiety assessed by CDAS. Two patients (3.5%) had got infected with COVID-19. Twenty-one (36.8%) participants experienced hair loss progression. Hair loss progression correlated with drug dose reduction (OR: 46.09, 95% CI 5.48–387.14, p < 0.001) although it did not influence by the level of anxiety evaluated by the CDAS (p > 0.05). Conclusion The anxiety perceived by severe AA patients about COVID-19 is mild;however, many experience hair loss progressions owing to their drug dose reduction.

3.
Dermatol Ther ; 35(3): e15283, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583585

ABSTRACT

We report two cases of lichen planus following COVID-19 vaccination in two middle-aged women, where the first patient presented with lichenplanopilaris (LPP) relapse and development of lichen planus 14 days after the second dose of AstraZeneca vaccine, and the other patient who had a previous scattered lesion of LP which extended and increased in severity after the first and second dose of Sinopharm. The suggested cause could be due to immune dysregulation and up regulation of T cell lymphocytes which was triggered after COVID-19 vaccination. What supports our hypothesis that LP had occurred due to COVID-19 vaccination, is that one of the patients responded successfully to Metronidazole. This means that the infection process after vaccination could be the cause in aggravating LP. To add, one of the suggested mechanisms for the appearance of LP or reactivation of a dormant LPP can be cytotoxic CD8 T-lymphocytes which increase the secretion of IFN-γ and IL-5 cytokines and may also result in basal keratinocytes' apoptosis leading to cutaneous manifestations. This was supported by the efficacy of Tofacitinib that was used in the other patient who presented with reactivation of LPP in addition to LP. Tofacitinib decrease the number of T cell infiltration and adjust IFN expression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lichen Planus , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Lichen Planus/diagnosis , Lichen Planus/drug therapy , Lichen Planus/etiology , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
4.
Skin Appendage Disord ; 8(3): 195-199, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582862

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The pandemic of COVID-19 has several implications for patients with chronic stress-sensitive diseases such as alopecia areata (AA). On the other hand, the vulnerability of AA patients using immunosuppressives to a more severe infection is in the shadow of ambiguity. This teledermatology study aimed to evaluate the course and outcome of AA in patients during this challenging period. Methods: Patients with AA who had previously received systemic therapy included in this study. Information about demographic data, AA history, characteristics, and treatments, hair loss progression, Corona Disease Anxiety Scale (CDAS), adherence to protective measures against the COVID-19, possible infection, and its features obtained via a telephone call. Results: A total of 57 patients participated. The majority (84.2%) of the participants had mild anxiety assessed by CDAS. Two patients (3.5%) had got infected with COVID-19. Twenty-one (36.8%) participants experienced hair loss progression. Hair loss progression correlated with drug dose reduction (OR: 46.09, 95% CI 5.48-387.14, p < 0.001) although it did not influence by the level of anxiety evaluated by the CDAS (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The anxiety perceived by severe AA patients about COVID-19 is mild; however, many experience hair loss progressions owing to their drug dose reduction.

5.
Clin Case Rep ; 9(3): 1583-1586, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052839

ABSTRACT

Although Necrotizing fasciitis can evolve from a trivial lesion, whenever it develops it requires a prompt surgical intervention and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy.

7.
Dermatitis ; 31(4): 233-237, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611904

ABSTRACT

In-hospital transmission is one of the main routes of the 2019 novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) spreading among health care workers (HCWs) who are the frontline fighters. However, coming into contact with COVID-19-positive patients is unavoidable. Therefore, hand hygiene is of utmost importance for the prevention of COVID-19 among HCWs. This purpose can be achieved by applying alcohol-based hand rubs, washing hands properly with soap and water, and applying other antiseptic agents. Nevertheless, regular hand hygiene could also be challenging, because water, detergents, and disinfectants may predispose HCWs to hand dermatitis. The current article reviews the risk factors for the development of hand dermatitis, with further focus on the most common agents used among HCWs. In addition, the risk of occupational hand dermatitis for each agent is evaluated to increase awareness of this common condition. Finally, some recommendations are discussed to reduce the effect of hand dermatitis on HCWs.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Dermatitis, Occupational/etiology , Dermatitis, Occupational/prevention & control , Hand Hygiene , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Anti-Infective Agents, Local/adverse effects , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disinfectants/adverse effects , Health Personnel , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Soaps/adverse effects
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