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1.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 908, 2021 Sep 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455937

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pre-existing comorbidities have been linked to SARS-CoV-2 infection but evidence is sparse on the importance and pattern of multimorbidity (2 or more conditions) and severity of infection indicated by hospitalisation or mortality. We aimed to use a multimorbidity index developed specifically for COVID-19 to investigate the association between multimorbidity and risk of severe SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: We used data from the UK Biobank linked to laboratory confirmed test results for SARS-CoV-2 infection and mortality data from Public Health England between March 16 and July 26, 2020. By reviewing the current literature on COVID-19 we derived a multimorbidity index including: (1) angina; (2) asthma; (3) atrial fibrillation; (4) cancer; (5) chronic kidney disease; (6) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; (7) diabetes mellitus; (8) heart failure; (9) hypertension; (10) myocardial infarction; (11) peripheral vascular disease; (12) stroke. Adjusted logistic regression models were used to assess the association between multimorbidity and risk of severe SARS-CoV-2 infection (hospitalisation/death). Potential effect modifiers of the association were assessed: age, sex, ethnicity, deprivation, smoking status, body mass index, air pollution, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, cardiorespiratory fitness, high sensitivity C-reactive protein. RESULTS: Among 360,283 participants, the median age was 68 [range 48-85] years, most were White (94.5%), and 1706 had severe SARS-CoV-2 infection. The prevalence of multimorbidity was more than double in those with severe SARS-CoV-2 infection (25%) compared to those without (11%), and clusters of several multimorbidities were more common in those with severe SARS-CoV-2 infection. The most common clusters with severe SARS-CoV-2 infection were stroke with hypertension (79% of those with stroke had hypertension); diabetes and hypertension (72%); and chronic kidney disease and hypertension (68%). Multimorbidity was independently associated with a greater risk of severe SARS-CoV-2 infection (adjusted odds ratio 1.91 [95% confidence interval 1.70, 2.15] compared to no multimorbidity). The risk remained consistent across potential effect modifiers, except for greater risk among older age. The highest risk of severe infection was strongly evidenced in those with CKD and diabetes (4.93 [95% CI 3.36, 7.22]). CONCLUSION: The multimorbidity index may help identify individuals at higher risk for severe COVID-19 outcomes and provide guidance for tailoring effective treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Hospitalization , Humans , Middle Aged , Multimorbidity , Risk Factors
2.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 717, 2021 Jul 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394426

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although age, obesity and pre-existing chronic diseases are established risk factors for COVID-19 outcomes, their interactions have not been well researched. METHODS: We used data from the Clinical Characterisation Protocol UK (CCP-UK) for Severe Emerging Infection developed by the International Severe Acute Respiratory and emerging Infections Consortium (ISARIC). Patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19 from 6th February to 12th October 2020 were included where there was a coded outcome following hospital admission. Obesity was determined by an assessment from a clinician and chronic disease by medical records. Chronic diseases included: chronic cardiac disease, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, chronic pulmonary disease, diabetes and cancer. Mutually exclusive categories of obesity, with or without chronic disease, were created. Associations with in-hospital mortality were examined across sex and age categories. RESULTS: The analysis included 27,624 women with 6407 (23.2%) in-hospital deaths and 35,065 men with 10,001 (28.5%) in-hospital deaths. The prevalence of chronic disease in women and men was 66.3 and 68.5%, respectively, while that of obesity was 12.9 and 11.1%, respectively. Association of obesity and chronic disease status varied by age (p < 0.001). Under 50 years of age, obesity and chronic disease were associated with in-hospital mortality within 28 days of admission in a dose-response manner, such that patients with both obesity and chronic disease had the highest risk with a hazard ratio (HR) of in-hospital mortality of 2.99 (95% CI: 2.12, 4.21) in men and 2.16 (1.42, 3.26) in women compared to patients without obesity or chronic disease. Between the ages of 50-69 years, obesity and chronic disease remained associated with in-hospital COVID-19 mortality, but survival in those with obesity was similar to those with and without prevalent chronic disease. Beyond the age of 70 years in men and 80 years in women there was no meaningful difference between those with and without obesity and/or chronic disease. CONCLUSION: Obesity and chronic disease are important risk factors for in-hospital mortality in younger age groups, with the combination of chronic disease and obesity being particularly important in those under 50 years of age. These findings have implications for targeted public health interventions, vaccination strategies and in-hospital clinical decision making.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Chronic Disease , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology
3.
EClinicalMedicine ; 34: 100830, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230444

ABSTRACT

Background: Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is the most prevalent metabolic disorder during pregnancy, however, the association between dyslipidaemia and GDM remains unclear. Methods: We searched Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, Cochrane, Maternity and Infant Care database (MIDIRS) and ClinicalTrials.gov up to February 2021 for relevant studies which reported on the circulating lipid profile during pregnancy, in women with and without GDM. Publications describing original data with at least one raw lipid [triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), or very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C)] measurement were retained. Data extraction was performed using a piloted data extraction form. The protocol was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42019139696). Findings: A total of 292 studies, comprising of 97,880 pregnant women (28232 GDM and 69,648 controls) were included. Using random-effects meta-analysis models to pool study estimates, women with GDM had significantly higher (by 20%) TG levels, with a pooled weighted mean difference between GDM and non-GDM pregnancies of 0.388 mM (0.336, 0.439, p < 0.001). Further analyses revealed elevated TG levels occur in the first trimester and persist afterwards. Meta-regression analyses showed that differences in TG levels between women with GDM and healthy controls were significantly associated with age, BMI, study continent, OGTT procedure, and GDM diagnosis criteria. Interpretation: Elevated lipids, particularly, TG, are associated with GDM.

4.
Obesity (Silver Spring) ; 29(7): 1223-1230, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146942

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the association of obesity with in-hospital coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outcomes in different ethnic groups. METHODS: Patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19 in the United Kingdom through the Clinical Characterisation Protocol UK (CCP-UK) developed by the International Severe Acute Respiratory and emerging Infections Consortium (ISARIC) were included from February 6 to October 12, 2020. Ethnicity was classified as White, South Asian, Black, and other minority ethnic groups. Outcomes were admission to critical care, mechanical ventilation, and in-hospital mortality, adjusted for age, sex, and chronic diseases. RESULTS: Of the participants included, 54,254 (age = 76 years; 45.0% women) were White, 3,728 (57 years; 41.1% women) were South Asian, 2,523 (58 years; 44.9% women) were Black, and 5,427 (61 years; 40.8% women) were other ethnicities. Obesity was associated with all outcomes in all ethnic groups, with associations strongest for black ethnicities. When stratified by ethnicity and obesity status, the odds ratios for admission to critical care, mechanical ventilation, and mortality in black ethnicities with obesity were 3.91 (3.13-4.88), 5.03 (3.94-6.63), and 1.93 (1.49-2.51), respectively, compared with White ethnicities without obesity. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity was associated with an elevated risk of in-hospital COVID-19 outcomes in all ethnic groups, with associations strongest in Black ethnicities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Ethnic Groups/statistics & numerical data , Minority Groups/statistics & numerical data , Obesity/ethnology , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , United Kingdom , Young Adult
5.
Eur J Public Health ; 31(3): 630-634, 2021 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142653

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People from South Asian and black minority ethnic groups are disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. It is unknown whether deprivation mediates this excess ethnic risk. METHODS: We used UK Biobank with linked COVID-19 outcomes occurring between 16th March 2020 and 24th August 2020. A four-way decomposition mediation analysis was used to model the extent to which the excess risk of testing positive, severe disease and mortality for COVID-19 in South Asian and black individuals, relative to white individuals, would be eliminated if levels of high material deprivation were reduced within the population. RESULTS: We included 15 044 (53.0% women) South Asian and black and 392 786 (55.2% women) white individuals. There were 151 (1.0%) positive tests, 91 (0.6%) severe cases and 31 (0.2%) deaths due to COVID-19 in South Asian and black individuals compared with 1471 (0.4%), 895 (0.2%) and 313 (0.1%), respectively, in white individuals. Compared with white individuals, the relative risk of testing positive for COVID-19, developing severe disease and COVID-19 mortality in South Asian and black individuals were 2.73 (95% CI: 2.26, 3.19), 2.96 (2.31, 3.61) and 4.04 (2.54, 5.55), respectively. A hypothetical intervention moving the 25% most deprived in the population out of deprivation was modelled to eliminate between 40 and 50% of the excess risk of all COVID-19 outcomes in South Asian and black populations, whereas moving the 50% most deprived out of deprivation would eliminate over 80% of the excess risk of COVID-19 outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The excess risk of COVID-19 outcomes in South Asian and black communities could be substantially reduced with population level policies targeting material deprivation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ethnic Groups , Female , Humans , Male , Minority Groups , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Wellcome Open Research ; 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-833219

ABSTRACT

The global coronavirus pandemic has precipitated a rapid unprecedented research response, including investigations into risk factors for COVID-19 infection, severity, or death. However, results from this research have produced heterogeneous findings, including articles published in Wellcome Open Research. Here, we use ethnicity, obesity, and smoking as illustrative examples to demonstrate how a research question can produce very different answers depending on how it is framed. For example, these factors can be both strongly associated or have a null association with death due to COVID-19, even when using the same dataset and statistical modelling. Highlighting the reasons underpinning this apparent paradox provides an important framework for reporting and interpreting ongoing COVID-19 research.

7.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-983

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 is a global pandemic and with current knowledge about the virus rapidly evolving, systematic reviews are needed to assess those most at ris

8.
Diabetes Obes Metab ; 22(10): 1915-1924, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-657128

ABSTRACT

AIM: To estimate the prevalence of both cardiometabolic and other co-morbidities in patients with COVID-19, and to estimate the increased risk of severity of disease and mortality in people with co-morbidities. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medline, Scopus and the World Health Organization website were searched for global research on COVID-19 conducted from January 2019 up to 23 April 2020. Study inclusion was restricted to English language publications, original articles that reported the prevalence of co-morbidities in individuals with COVID-19, and case series including more than 10 patients. Eighteen studies were selected for inclusion. Data were analysed using random effects meta-analysis models. RESULTS: Eighteen studies with a total of 14 558 individuals were identified. The pooled prevalence for co-morbidities in patients with COVID-19 disease was 22.9% (95% CI: 15.8 to 29.9) for hypertension, 11.5% (9.7 to 13.4) for diabetes, and 9.7% (6.8 to 12.6) for cardiovascular disease (CVD). For chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic kidney disease (CKD), cerebrovascular disease and cancer, the pooled prevalences were all less than 4%. With the exception of cerebrovascular disease, all the other co-morbidities presented a significantly increased risk for having severe COVID-19. In addition, the risk of mortality was significantly increased in individuals with CVD, COPD, CKD, cerebrovascular disease and cancer. CONCLUSIONS: In individuals with COVID-19, the presence of co-morbidities (both cardiometabolic and other) is associated with a higher risk of severe COVID-19 and mortality. These findings have important implications for public health with regard to risk stratification and future planning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Complications/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/pathology , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/mortality , Mortality , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/mortality , Pandemics , Prevalence , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/mortality , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/pathology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/mortality , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index
9.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 14(5): 965-967, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611900

ABSTRACT

Routine care for chronic disease is an ongoing major challenge. We aimed to evaluate the global impact of COVID-19 on routine care for chronic diseases. An online survey was posted 31 March to 23 April 2020 targeted at healthcare professionals. 202 from 47 countries responded. Most reported change in routine care to virtual communication. Diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and hypertension were the most impacted conditions due to reduction in access to care. 80% reported the mental health of their patients worsened during COVID-19. It is important routine care continues in spite of the pandemic, to avoid a rise in non-COVID-19-related morbidity and mortality.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Chronic Disease/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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