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1.
Open Heart ; 9(2), 2022.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-2009228

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine risk factors for cardiac-related postacute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC) in community-dwelling adults after acute COVID-19 infection. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional analysis among adults who tested positive for COVID-19. Outcomes were self-reported cardiac-related PASC. We conducted stepwise multivariable logistic regression to assess association between the risk factors (existing cardiovascular disease (CVD), pre-existing conditions, days since positive test, COVID-19 hospitalisation, age, sex, education, income) and cardiac-related PASC. Results: In a sample of 442 persons, mean (SD) age was 45.4 (16.2) years, 71% were women, 13% were black, 46% had pre-existing conditions, 23% had cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and 4% had CVD. Prevalence of cardiac PASC was 43% and newly diagnosed cardiac conditions were 27%. The odds for cardiac-related PASC were higher among persons with underlying pre-existing conditions (adjusted OR (aOR): 2.00, 95% CI: 1.28 to 3.10) and among those who were hospitalised (aOR: 3.03, 95% CI: 1.58 to 5.83). Conclusions: More than a third of persons with COVID-19 reported cardiac-related PASC symptoms. Underlying CVD, pre-existing diseases, age and COVID-19 hospitalisation are possible risk factors for cardiac-related PASC symptoms. COVID-19 may exacerbate CV risk factors and increase risk of complications.

2.
Heart International ; 16(1):20-27, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1935227

ABSTRACT

There are four main myocarditis presentations identified in the context of severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2): myocarditis associated with acute coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection, post-acute COVID-19 syndrome, multisystem inflammatory syndrome, and vaccination-associated myocarditis. This article reviews the clinical features and current management strategies for each of these presentations. The overall prevalence of myocarditis is considered to be rare, although accurate estimation is affected by heterogeneity in diagnostic criteria and reporting, as well as infrequent use of gold-standard diagnostic endomyocardial biopsy. Severity of disease can range from mild symptoms to fulminant myocarditis. Therapeutic interventions are typically supportive and extrapolated from treatment for non-COVID-19 viral myocarditis. Several pathogenic mechanisms for the development of myocarditis have been proposed, and ongoing research is critical for elucidating disease pathogenesis and potentially identifying therapeutic targets. The long-term cardiovascular sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infections and associated myocarditis require further elucidation and understanding.

3.
Heart International ; 16(1):28-36, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1935190

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been associated with a wide spectrum of cardiovascular manifestations. Since the beginning of the pandemic, echocardiography has served as a valuable tool for triaging, diagnosing and managing patients with COVID-19. More recently, speckle-tracking echocardiography has been shown to be effective in demonstrating subclinical myocardial dysfunction that is often not detected in standard echocardiography. Echocardiographic findings in COVID-19 patients include left or right ventricular dysfunction, including abnormal longitudinal strain and focal wall motion abnormalities, valvular dysfunction and pericardial effusion. Additionally, some of these echocardiographic abnormalities have been shown to correlate with biomarkers and adverse clinical outcomes, suggesting an additional prognostic value of echocardiography. With increasing evidence of cardiac sequelae of COVID-19, the use of echocardiography has expanded to patients with cardiopulmonary symptoms after recovery from initial infection. This article aims to highlight the available echocardiographic tools and to summarize the echocardiographic findings across the full spectrum of COVID-19 disease and their correlations with biomarkers and mortality.

4.
Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes ; 15, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1938113

ABSTRACT

Background: Caregivers of persons with heart failure must manage high levels of patient health care utilization, treatment complexity and often unpredictable stressors associated with intermittent symptom exacerbations and mortality. Interventions have often focused on the needs of the person with HF, not the caregiver. Therefore, we developed an intervention using human-centered design to provide caregiver-targeted support for this population. Objective: Pilot test the feasibility and gauge initial effect size of the Caregiver Support intervention to improve quality of life (mental and physical), caregiver burden, and self-efficacy among family caregivers from baseline to 16 weeks. Methods: The intervention includes five individualized, nurse-led sessions over 10 weeks conducted remotely (due to COVID-19). Intervention components focus on 1) nature of caregiving, 2) life purpose, 3) co-development of an action plan to address caregiver goals to reduce caregiver burden and improve caregiver well-being, 4) exploration of social and community resources to support unmet needs, and 5) building a sustainability plan for addressing future caregiver needs. We tested our approach in a randomized waitlist control pilot trial (N=35) from August 2020 through March 2022. We calculated enrollment and retention rates, described acceptability, and computed intervention effect sizes from baseline to 16 weeks. Results: 35 out of 101 (35%) eligible caregivers enrolled and were majority female (93.3%), White (60%) and spousal caregivers (63.3%). Average age was 59.4 ± 16.6 years. Overall retention was 69%. All intervention participants completed the five core components, reporting high levels of satisfaction and acceptability of activities. Between-group effect sizes (n=21) at 16 weeks suggest improvement in the mental health component of quality of life, caregiver burden, and self-efficacy (effect sizes 0.88, 0.31, and 0.63, respectively). Conclusion: Caregivers found Caregiver Support acceptable and study methods were feasible, despite challenges to engaging during the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings provide foundational evidence that this person-centered behavioral intervention can contribute to enhanced caregiver outcomes.

6.
Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation ; 40(4):S210-S210, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1187315
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