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1.
Pediatrics ; 149(6)2022 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760010

ABSTRACT

Nonrespiratory conditions related to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections have been largely described. Ileocolic intussusception has been reported in association with SARS-CoV-2 infection in 10 children, raising the possibility of an etiopathologic role for the virus, but none of these cases documented tissue pathology that would have supported SARS-CoV-2 intestinal inflammation. We report 2 cases of intussusception in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection who were treated at different pediatric tertiary centers in Europe and provide evidence of the presence of the virus in mesenteric and intestinal tissues of the patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intussusception , COVID-19/complications , Child , Europe , Humans , Infant , Intussusception/diagnostic imaging , Intussusception/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 6610, 2021 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1521737

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 typically manifests as a respiratory illness, but several clinical reports have described gastrointestinal symptoms. This is particularly true in children in whom gastrointestinal symptoms are frequent and viral shedding outlasts viral clearance from the respiratory system. These observations raise the question of whether the virus can replicate within the stomach. Here we generate gastric organoids from fetal, pediatric, and adult biopsies as in vitro models of SARS-CoV-2 infection. To facilitate infection, we induce reverse polarity in the gastric organoids. We find that the pediatric and late fetal gastric organoids are susceptible to infection with SARS-CoV-2, while viral replication is significantly lower in undifferentiated organoids of early fetal and adult origin. We demonstrate that adult gastric organoids are more susceptible to infection following differentiation. We perform transcriptomic analysis to reveal a moderate innate antiviral response and a lack of differentially expressed genes belonging to the interferon family. Collectively, we show that the virus can efficiently infect the gastric epithelium, suggesting that the stomach might have an active role in fecal-oral SARS-CoV-2 transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Intestinal Mucosa/virology , Organoids/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Stomach/virology , Virus Replication/physiology , Aborted Fetus , Aged , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Child , Child, Preschool , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Infant , Intestinal Mucosa/pathology , Middle Aged , Organoids/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stomach/pathology
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