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9.
British Journal of Dermatology ; 183(SUPPL 1):200, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1093710

ABSTRACT

Psoriasis is a common immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease with frequent multimorbidity, and immunosuppressants are the mainstay of treatment in moderate-to-severe disease. An understanding of the impact of COVID-19 on individuals with psoriasis and the effect of psoriasis therapies on the course of COVID-19 is urgently required to inform clinical decision-making. This study sought to characterize the clinical course of COVID-19 in patients with psoriasis and to identify factors associated with hospitalization. Clinicianreported cases of confirmed or suspected COVID-19 in psoriasis were collected via an international online registry. Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression identified factors associated with hospitalization. Patient risk-mitigating behaviours were characterized using an independent global selfreport registry. In total, 334 clinician-reported cases (median age 50 years, 62% male, median body mass index 28 kg m-2, 85% white) from 22 countries [most frequently, the U.K. (35%), Italy (22%) and Spain (16%)] were available between 27 March and 20 June 2020. Altogether, 245 (73.3%) patients were receiving a biologic, 54 (16.2%) a nonbiologic and 31 (9.3%) no systemic treatment. Overall, 311 (93.1%) achieved a full recovery, 71 (21.2%) were hospitalized and nine (2.7%) died. Risk factors associated with hospitalization were older age [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.26-2.32], male sex (aOR 2.37, 95% CI 1.11-5.04) and nonwhite ethnicity (aOR 3.40, 95% CI 1.27-9.11), in addition to chronic lung disease (aOR 4.37, 95% CI 1.62-11.74) and hypertension (aOR 2.23, 95% CI 1.05-4.74). Reduced risk of hospitalization was associated with use of a biologic (aOR 0.42, 95% CI 0.18-0.98) vs. nonbiological systemic therapy. There was no difference in risk of hospitalization between classes of biologics. An independent selfreport psoriasis registry (1167 patients from 39 countries) suggested increased social isolation (76% vs. 66%;P < 0.05) but similar nonadherence to medication (18% vs 22%) in patients receiving biologics vs. nonbiological systemic treatments. In this international moderate-to-severe psoriasis case series, most patients fully recovered from COVID-19;older age, being male and being of nonwhite ethnicity increased risk of hospitalization. Use of biologics, when compared with nonbiological systemic therapies, was associated with reduced risk of hospitalization;however, this requires further study owing to potential selection bias and unmeasured confounding such as a difference in risk-mitigating behaviours.

10.
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol ; 35(2): 281-317, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066706

ABSTRACT

This evidence- and consensus-based guideline on the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris was developed following the EuroGuiDerm Guideline and Consensus Statement Development Manual. The second part of the guideline provides guidance for specific clinical and comorbid situations such as treating psoriasis vulgaris patient with concomitant psoriatic arthritis, concomitant inflammatory bowel disease, a history of malignancies or a history of depression or suicidal ideation. It further holds recommendations for concomitant diabetes, viral hepatitis, disease affecting the heart or the kidneys as well as concomitant neurological disease. Advice on how to screen for tuberculosis and recommendations on how to manage patients with a positive tuberculosis test result are given. It further covers treatment for pregnant women or patients with a wish for a child in the near future. Information on vaccination, immunogenicity and systemic treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic is also provided.


Subject(s)
Psoriasis/complications , Psoriasis/therapy , Humans , Psoriasis/psychology
11.
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol ; 35(4): 797-806, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060905

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by SARS-CoV-2, a novel RNA virus that was declared a global pandemic on 11 March 2020. The efficiency of infection with SARS-CoV-2 is reflected by its rapid global spread. The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has implications for patients with inflammatory skin diseases on systemic immunotherapy who may be at increased risk of infection or more severe infection. This position paper is a focused examination of current evidence considering the mechanisms of action of immunotherapeutic drugs in relation to immune response to SARS-CoV-2. We aim to provide practical guidance for dermatologists managing patients with inflammatory skin conditions on systemic therapies during the current pandemic and beyond. Considering the limited and rapidly evolving evidence, mechanisms of action of therapies, and current knowledge of SARS-CoV-2 infection, we propose that systemic immunotherapy can be continued, with special considerations for at risk patients or those presenting with symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatitis/therapy , Immunotherapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , Risk Assessment
12.
Br J Dermatol ; 185(1): 80-90, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-991224

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Registry data suggest that people with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) receiving targeted systemic therapies have fewer adverse coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outcomes compared with patients receiving no systemic treatments. OBJECTIVES: We used international patient survey data to explore the hypothesis that greater risk-mitigating behaviour in those receiving targeted therapies may account, at least in part, for this observation. METHODS: Online surveys were completed by individuals with psoriasis (globally) or rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) (UK only) between 4 May and 7 September 2020. We used multiple logistic regression to assess the association between treatment type and risk-mitigating behaviour, adjusting for clinical and demographic characteristics. We characterized international variation in a mixed-effects model. RESULTS: Of 3720 participants (2869 psoriasis, 851 RMDs) from 74 countries, 2262 (60·8%) reported the most stringent risk-mitigating behaviour (classified here under the umbrella term 'shielding'). A greater proportion of those receiving targeted therapies (biologics and Janus Kinase inhibitors) reported shielding compared with those receiving no systemic therapy [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1·63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·35-1·97]. The association between targeted therapy and shielding was preserved when standard systemic therapy was used as the reference group (OR 1·39, 95% CI 1·23-1·56). Shielding was associated with established risk factors for severe COVID-19 [male sex (OR 1·14, 95% CI 1·05-1·24), obesity (OR 1·37, 95% CI 1·23-1·54), comorbidity burden (OR 1·43, 95% CI 1·15-1·78)], a primary indication of RMDs (OR 1·37, 95% CI 1·27-1·48) and a positive anxiety or depression screen (OR 1·57, 95% CI 1·36-1·80). Modest differences in the proportion shielding were observed across nations. CONCLUSIONS: Greater risk-mitigating behaviour among people with IMIDs receiving targeted therapies may contribute to the reported lower risk of adverse COVID-19 outcomes. The behaviour variation across treatment groups, IMIDs and nations reinforces the need for clear evidence-based patient communication on risk-mitigation strategies and may help inform updated public health guidelines as the pandemic continues.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Joint Diseases , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol ; 34(11): 2499-2504, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-613908

ABSTRACT

On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) a global pandemic, caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2 virus). A consistent number of case reports and clinical series have been already published describing a complex spectrum of skin manifestations associated with the SARS-CoV-2 infection. We carried out a review of the English-language literature up to 20 May 2020, reporting original cases or case series of the cutaneous manifestations of SARS-CoV-2 virus infection. The following databases were consulted: PubMed, Embase, Google Scholar and ResearchGate. The search of papers was conducted by using the key term 'COVID-19' or 'SARS-CoV-2' or 'coronavirus' combined with each of the following: 'skin', 'cutaneous', 'dermatologic' or 'dermatology', 'manifestation', 'lesions', or 'rash'. The patterns of dermatological manifestations associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection could be classified into four categories: exanthema (varicella-like, papulo-vesicular and morbilliform rash), vascular (chilblain-like, purpuric/petechial and livedoid lesions), urticarial and acro-papular eruption. Lastly, other skin manifestations to be considered are the cutaneous adverse reactions to the drugs prescribed for the treatment of COVID-19. Whether SARS-CoV-2 infection can directly cause a worsening of chronic inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis or atopic dermatitis remains to be determined. Dermatology's outlook in the COVID-19 pandemic is multidimensional.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Skin Diseases/virology , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol ; 34(6): 1196-1201, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-102162

ABSTRACT

Since the first case of 'pneumonia of unknown aetiology' was diagnosed at the Wuhan Jinyintan Hospital in China on 30 December 2019, what was recognized thereafter as 'severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2' (SARS-CoV-2) has spread over the four continents, causing the respiratory manifestations of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) and satisfying the epidemiological criteria for a label of 'pandemic'. The ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is having a huge impact on dermatological practice including the marked reduction of face-to-face consultations in favour of teledermatology, the uncertainties concerning the outcome of COVID-19 infection in patients with common inflammatory disorders such as psoriasis or atopic dermatitis receiving immunosuppressive/immunomodulating systemic therapies; the direct involvement of dermatologists in COVID-19 care for patient assistance and new research needs to be addressed. It is not known yet if skin lesions and derangement of the skin barrier could make it easier for SARS-CoV-2 to transmit via indirect contact; it remains to be defined if specific mucosal or skin lesions are associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection, although some unpublished observations indicate the occurrence of a transient varicelliform exanthema during the early phase of the infection. SARS-CoV-2 is a new pathogen for humans that is highly contagious, can spread quickly, and is capable of causing enormous health, economic and societal impacts in any setting. The consequences may continue long after the pandemic resolves, and new management modalities for dermatology may originate from the COVID-19 disaster. Learning from experience may help to cope with future major societal changes.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Skin Diseases/therapy , COVID-19 , China , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Dermatologists/organization & administration , Female , Humans , Male , Occupational Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Risk Assessment , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/prevention & control
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