Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 28
Filter
1.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 13: 801133, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731766

ABSTRACT

Background: acute illnesses, like COVID-19, can act as a catabolic stimulus on muscles. So far, no study has evaluated muscle mass and quality through limb ultrasound in post-COVID-19 patients. Methods: cross sectional observational study, including patients seen one month after hospital discharge for SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. The patients underwent a multidimensional evaluation. Moreover, we performed dominant medial gastrocnemius ultrasound (US) to characterize their muscle mass and quality. Results: two hundred fifty-nine individuals (median age 67, 59.8% males) were included in the study. COVID-19 survivors with reduced muscle strength had a lower muscle US thickness (1.6 versus 1.73 cm, p =0.02) and a higher muscle stiffness (87 versus 76.3, p = 0.004) compared to patients with normal muscle strength. Also, patients with reduced Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) scores had a lower muscle US thickness (1.3 versus 1.71 cm, p = 0.01) and a higher muscle stiffness (104.9 versus 81.07, p = 0.04) compared to individuals with normal SPPB scores. The finding of increased muscle stiffness was also confirmed in patients with a pathological value (≥ 4) at the sarcopenia screening tool SARC-F (103.0 versus 79.55, p < 0.001). Muscle stiffness emerged as a significant predictor of probable sarcopenia (adjusted OR 1.02, 95% C.I. 1.002 - 1.04, p = 0.03). The optimal ultrasound cut-offs for probable sarcopenia were 1.51 cm for muscle thickness (p= 0.017) and 73.95 for muscle stiffness (p = 0.004). Discussion: we described muscle ultrasound characteristics in post COVID-19 patients. Muscle ultrasound could be an innovative tool to assess muscle mass and quality in this population. Our preliminary findings need to be confirmed by future studies comparing muscle ultrasound with already validated techniques for measuring muscle mass and quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Muscle Strength/physiology , Muscle, Skeletal/pathology , Muscular Diseases/diagnosis , Survivors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Extremities/diagnostic imaging , Extremities/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Muscle, Skeletal/diagnostic imaging , Muscular Diseases/etiology , Muscular Diseases/pathology , Muscular Diseases/physiopathology , Organ Size , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sarcopenia/diagnosis , Sarcopenia/epidemiology , Sarcopenia/etiology , Survivors/statistics & numerical data , Ultrasonography
2.
Rev Endocr Metab Disord ; 22(4): 1201-1218, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1630454

ABSTRACT

The 4th International Conference on Controversies in Vitamin D was held as a virtual meeting in September, 2020, gathering together leading international scientific and medical experts in vitamin D. Since vitamin D has a crucial role in skeletal and extra-skeletal systems, the aim of the Conference was to discuss improved management of vitamin D dosing, therapeutic levels and form or route of administration in the general population and in different clinical conditions. A tailored approach, based on the specific mechanisms underlying vitamin D deficiency in different diseases that were discussed, was recommended. Specifically, in comparison to healthy populations, higher levels of vitamin D and greater amounts of vitamin D were deemed necessary in osteoporosis, diabetes mellitus, obesity (particularly after bariatric surgery), and in those treated with glucocorticoids. Emerging and still open issues were related to target vitamin D levels and the role of vitamin D supplementation in COVID-19 since low vitamin D may predispose to SARS-CoV-2 infection and to worse COVID-19 outcomes. Finally, whereas oral daily cholecalciferol appears to be the preferred choice for vitamin D supplementation in the general population, and in most clinical conditions, active vitamin D analogs may be indicated in patients with hypoparathyroidism and severe kidney and liver insufficiency. Parenteral vitamin D administration could be helpful in malabsorption syndromes or in states of vitamin D resistance.Specific guidelines for desired levels of vitamin D should be tailored to the different conditions affecting vitamin D metabolism with the goal to define disease-specific normative values.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vitamin D Deficiency , Cholecalciferol , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D , Vitamin D Deficiency/drug therapy
3.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab ; 107(1): e348-e360, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592846

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: A high prevalence of vitamin D (VD) deficiency in COVID-19 patients has been reported and hypothesized to increase COVID-19 severity likely because of its negative impact on immune and inflammatory responses. Furthermore, clear associations between hypovitaminosis D and fat body mass excess and diabetes, factors associated with COVID-19 severity, have been widely recognized. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate in COVID-19 patients the relationship between VD levels and inflammatory response, body mass index (BMI), blood glucose (GLU), and disease severity. METHODS: Patients admitted to San Raffaele-Hospital for COVID-19 were enrolled in this study, excluding those with comorbidities and therapies influencing VD metabolism. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D levels, plasma GLU levels, BMI, and inflammatory parameters were evaluated at admission. RESULTS: A total of 88 patients were included. Median VD level was 16.3 ng/mL and VD deficiency was found in 68.2% of patients. VD deficiency was found more frequently in male patients and in those affected by severe COVID-19. Regression analyses showed a positive correlation between VD and PaO2/FiO2 ratio, and negative correlations between VD and plasma GLU, BMI, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, C-reactive protein, and interleukin 6. Patients with both hypovitaminosis D and diabetes mellitus, as well those with hypovitaminosis D and overweight, were more frequently affected by a severe disease with worse inflammatory response and respiratory parameters, compared to those without or just one of these conditions. CONCLUSION: We showed, for the first-time, a strict association of VD levels with blood GLU and BMI in COVID-19 patients. VD deficiency might be a novel common pathophysiological mechanism involved in the detrimental effect of hyperglycemia and adiposity on disease severity.


Subject(s)
Adiposity/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Hyperglycemia/epidemiology , Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology , Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Glucose/analysis , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Hyperglycemia/blood , Hyperglycemia/diagnosis , Hyperglycemia/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/diagnosis , Vitamin D Deficiency/immunology
5.
Endocrine ; 74(2): 219-225, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442182

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hypocalcemia has been identified as a major distinctive feature of COVID-19, predicting poor clinical outcomes. Among the mechanisms underlying this biochemical finding, high prevalence of vitamin D (VD) deficiency in COVID-19 patients reported so far in several studies was advocated. However, robust data in favor of this hypothesis are still lacking. Therefore, aim of our study was to investigate the role of hypovitaminosis D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels in the development of hypocalcemia in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Patients admitted to IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele for COVID-19 were enrolled in this study, excluding those with comorbidities and therapies influencing calcium and VD metabolism. Serum levels of total calcium (tCa), ionized calcium (Ca2+), 25-OH-VD, and PTH were evaluated at admission. We defined VD deficiency as VD below 20 ng/mL, hypocalcemia as tCa below 2.2 mmol/L or as Ca2+ below 1.18 mmol/L, and hyperparathyroidism as PTH above 65 pg/mL. RESULTS: A total of 78 patients were included in the study. Median tCa and Ca2+ levels were 2.15 and 1.15 mmol/L, respectively. Total and ionized hypocalcemia were observed in 53 (67.9%) and 55 (70.5%) patients, respectively. VD deficiency was found in 67.9% of patients, but secondary hyperparathyroidism was detected in 20.5% of them, only. tCa levels were significantly lower in patients with VD deficiency and regression analyses showed a positive correlation between VD and tCa. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, we confirmed a high prevalence of hypocalcemia in COVID-19 patients and we showed for the first time that it occurred largely in the context of marked hypovitaminosis D not adequately compensated by secondary hyperparathyroidism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary , Hypocalcemia , Parathyroid Hormone/physiology , Vitamin D Deficiency , COVID-19/complications , Calcium , Humans , Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary/epidemiology , Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary/virology , Hypocalcemia/epidemiology , Hypocalcemia/virology , Italy , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications , Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology
6.
Rev Endocr Metab Disord ; 23(2): 215-231, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356029

ABSTRACT

Besides the pulmonary manifestations caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), an emerging endocrine phenotype, which can heavily impact on the severity of the syndrome, has been recently associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Patients with pituitary diseases or the pituitary gland itself may also be involved in COVID-19 clinical presentation and/or severity, causing pituitary apoplexy.Moreover, hypopituitarism is frequently burdened by several metabolic complications, including arterial hypertension, hyperglycemia, obesity and vertebral fractures, which have all been associated with poor outcomes and increased mortality in patients infected by SARS-CoV-2.This review will discuss hypopituitarism as a condition that might have a bidirectional relationship with COVID-19 due to the frequent presence of metabolic comorbidities, to the direct or indirect pituitary damage or being per se a potential risk factor for COVID-19. Finally, we will address the current recommendations for the clinical management of vaccines in patients with hypopituitarism and adrenal insufficiency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypopituitarism , COVID-19/complications , Comorbidity , Humans , Hypopituitarism/complications , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Diabetes Metab ; 47(6): 101268, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330744

ABSTRACT

AIM: Obesity is a risk factor for COVID-19, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We investigated the role of adiponectin (an anti-inflammatory adipokine), leptin (a pro-inflammatory adipokine) and their ratio (Adpn/Lep) in this context. DESIGN: Single-centre, prospective observational study. METHODS: Adiponectin and leptin were measured in 60 COVID-19 patients with mild (not hospitalised, n=11), moderate (hospitalised but not requiring intensive care, n=25) and severe (admission to the intensive care unit [ICU] or death, n=24) disease. RESULTS: Adiponectin and leptin levels were similar across severity groups, but patients with moderate severity had the highest Adpn/Lep ratio (1.2 [0.5; 2.0], 5.0 [1.6; 11.2], 2.1 [1.0; 3.6] in mild, moderate and severe disease; P = 0.019). Adpn/Lep, but not adiponectin or leptin alone, correlated with systemic inflammation (C reactive protein, CRP: Spearman's rho 0.293, P = 0.023). When dividing patients into Adpn/Lep tertiles, adiponectin was highest, whereas leptin was lowest in the third (highest) tertile. Patients in the highest Adpn/Lep tertile had numerically lower rates of obesity, diabetes and hypertension, and lower rates of death or admission to ICU versus other tertiles. At linear regression in the whole cohort, CRP significantly predicted Adpn/Lep (ß 0.291, P = 0.022), while female gender (ß -0.289, P = 0.016), diabetes (ß -0.257, P = 0.028), and hypertension (ß -239, P = 0.043) were negative predictors. CONCLUSIONS: We speculate that the rise in Adpn/Lep, due to increased adiponectin and reduced leptin, is a compensatory response to systemic inflammation. In patients with worse cardiometabolic health (e.g. diabetes, hypertension) this mechanism might be blunted, possibly contributing to higher mortality.


Subject(s)
Adiponectin , COVID-19 , Leptin , Adiponectin/blood , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Leptin/blood , Male , Prospective Studies , Survival Analysis
10.
Int J Obes (Lond) ; 45(9): 1986-1994, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232062

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is associated with unintentional weight loss. Little is known on whether and how patients regain the lost weight. We assessed changes in weight and abdominal adiposity over a three-month follow-up after discharge in COVID-19 survivors. METHODS: In this sub-study of a large prospective observational investigation, we collected data from individuals who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 and re-evaluated at one (V1) and three (V2) months after discharge. Patient characteristics upon admission and anthropometrics, waist circumference and hunger levels assessed during follow-up were analyzed across BMI categories. RESULTS: One-hundred-eighty-five COVID-19 survivors (71% male, median age 62.1 [54.3; 72.1] years, 80% with overweight/obesity) were included. Median BMI did not change from admission to V1 in normal weight subjects (-0.5 [-1.2; 0.6] kg/m2, p = 0.08), but significantly decreased in subjects with overweight (-0.8 [-1.8; 0.3] kg/m2, p < 0.001) or obesity (-1.38 [-3.4; -0.3] kg/m2, p < 0.001; p < 0.05 vs. normal weight or obesity). Median BMI did not change from V1 to V2 in normal weight individuals (+0.26 [-0.34; 1.15] kg/m2, p = 0.12), but significantly increased in subjects with overweight (+0.4 [0.0; 1.0] kg/m2, p < 0.001) or obesity (+0.89 [0.0; 1.6] kg/m2, p < 0.001; p = 0.01 vs. normal weight). Waist circumference significantly increased from V1 to V2 in the whole group (p < 0.001), driven by the groups with overweight or obesity. At multivariable regression analyses, male sex, hunger at V1 and initial weight loss predicted weight gain at V2. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with overweight or obesity hospitalized for COVID-19 exhibit rapid, wide weight fluctuations that may worsen body composition (abdominal adiposity). CLINICALTRIALS. GOV REGISTRATION: NCT04318366.


Subject(s)
Body-Weight Trajectory , COVID-19/physiopathology , Obesity, Abdominal/physiopathology , Overweight/physiopathology , Survivors , Adiposity , Aged , Anthropometry , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity, Abdominal/virology , Overweight/virology , Prospective Studies , Waist Circumference
12.
Endocrine ; 72(3): 597-603, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230294

ABSTRACT

Vitamin D (VITD) is a key hormone for bone health and has relevant extra-skeletal effects that might play a role in the prevention and treatment of COronaVIrus Disease 19 (COVID-19). Literature regarding this scenario is voluminous but controversial. Glucocorticoid Induced Osteoporosis Skeletal Endocrinology Group (G.I.O.S.E.G) has been present in the scientific debate about the use of VITD and has regularly interfaced national regulatory agencies to ensure appropriateness of its employment. Given the current pandemic and the questions on COVID-19 and VITD, G.I.O.S.E.G. appointed an expert panel to advise how to consider this issue best. The results of these deliberations are reported in the current recommendation paper.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vitamin D , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamins
13.
Journal of the Endocrine Society ; 5(Supplement_1):A278-A278, 2021.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1221771

ABSTRACT

High prevalence of vitamin D (VD) deficiency in COVID-19 patients was reported by several studies. Since VD is a key regulating factor of both innate and adaptive immunity, it was hypothesized that VD deficiency may predispose to SARS-CoV-2 infection and lower levels of VD could be related to increased COVID-19 severity and worse outcome risks. However, to date, only few studies partially investigated the relationship between VD and inflammatory and immune response and clinical features of COVID-19 patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of vitamin D levels on COVID-19 inflammatory activity, clinical pattern and disease severity. Patients admitted to San Raffaele University Hospital for COVID-19 from February 2020 were enrolled in this study. We excluded patients with comorbidities and therapies influencing VD metabolism. 25OH-Vitamin D levels were evaluated at admission in hospital and VD insufficiency and deficiency were defined as VD level below 30 ng/mL and 20 ng/mL, respectively. A total of 88 patients were included in the study. Median (IQR) VD levels were 16.3 (11.2–23.9) ng/mL. VD insufficiency and deficiency were found in 88.6% and in 68.2% of patients, respectively. Linear regression analyses showed a positive correlation between VD levels and PaO2/FiO2 ratio (p=0.019;r=0.254), and negative correlations between VD levels and Neutrophil/Lymphocyte (N/L) ratio (p=0.04;r=-0.19), C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (p=0.047;r=-0.18) and Interleukin 6 (IL-6) levels (p=0.04;r=-0.22). Lower VD levels were found in patients affected by severe disease (needs for high-flow oxygen therapy and/or noninvasive mechanical ventilation, admitted to ICU and/or dead) than non-severe patients (13.4 ng/mL [10.37–19.15] vs 18.45 ng/mL [15.15–24.95];p=0.007). Moreover, patients with VD deficiency had higher levels of CRP, LDH, IL-6, IFN-gamma (p=0.04, p=0.01, p=0.002, p=0.04;respectively), lower PaO2/FiO2 and higher N/L ratios (p=0.008, p=0.004;respectively), and higher rate of severe disease (65% vs 39%, p=0.02), as compared to VD non-deficient ones. In conclusion, low VD levels are widely found in hospitalized COVID-19 and may lead to increased disease severity through an excessive immune-inflammatory response. Our data suggest that reaching adequate vitamin D levels in risky population may contribute to prevention of COVID-19 occurrence and severity.

14.
Pituitary ; 24(3): 465-481, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1210726

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite COVID-19 being identified as severe respiratory viral infection, progressively many relevant endocrine manifestations have been reported greatly contributing to the severity of the clinical presentation. Systemic involvement in COVID-19 is due to the ubiquitous expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor, responsible for the entry in the cells of SARS-CoV-2, Several reports in humans and animal models showed a significant ACE2 mRNA expression in hypothalamus and pituitary cells. Moreover, higher mortality and poorer outcomes have been widely described in COVID-19 patients with obesity, diabetes and vertebral fractures, which are all highly prevalent in subjects with pituitary dysfunctions. AIM: To review the main endocrine manifestations of COVID-19 with their possible implications for pituitary diseases, the possible direct and indirect involvement of the pituitary gland in COVID-19, the impact of COVID-19 on the management of established pituitary diseases which can be already at increased risk for worse outcomes and on neurosurgical activities as well as vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: Our review underlines that there could be a specific involvement of the pituitary gland which fits into a progressively shaping endocrine phenotype of COVID-19. Moreover, the care for pituitary diseases need to continue despite the restrictions due to the emergency. Several pituitary diseases, such as hypopituitarism and Cushing disease, or due to frequent comorbidities such as diabetes may be a risk factor for severe COVID-19 in affected patients. There is the urgent need to collect in international multicentric efforts data on all these aspects of the pituitary involvement in the pandemic in order to issue evidence driven recommendations for the management of pituitary patients in the persistent COVID-19 emergency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Pituitary Diseases/virology , Pituitary Gland/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Pituitary Diseases/epidemiology , Pituitary Diseases/physiopathology , Pituitary Diseases/therapy , Pituitary Gland/metabolism , Pituitary Gland/physiopathology , Prognosis , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Virus Internalization
15.
Rev Endocr Metab Disord ; 23(2): 299-308, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1179088

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 extra-pulmonary features include several endocrine manifestations and these are becoming strongly clinically relevant in patients affected influencing disease severity and outcomes.At the beginning of COVID-19 pandemic no population data on calcium levels in patients affected were available and in April 2020 a first case of severe acute hypocalcemia in an Italian patient with SARS-CoV-2 infection was reported. Subsequently, several studies reported hypocalcemia as a highly prevalent biochemical abnormality in COVID-19 patients with a marked negative influence on disease severity, biochemical inflammation and thrombotic markers, and mortality. Also a high prevalence of vertebral fractures with worse respiratory impairment in patients affected and a widespread vitamin D deficiency have been frequently observed, suggesting an emerging "Osteo-Metabolic Phenotype" in COVID-19.To date, several potential pathophysiological factors have been hypothesized to play a role in determining hypocalcemia in COVID-19 including calcium dependent viral mechanisms of action, high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in general population, chronic and acute malnutrition during critical illness and high levels of unbound and unsaturated fatty acids in inflammatory responses.Since hypocalcemia is a frequent biochemical finding in hospitalized COVID-19 patients possibly predicting worse outcomes and leading to acute cardiovascular and neurological complications if severe, it is reasonable to assess, monitor and, if indicated, replace calcium at first patient hospital evaluation and during hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypocalcemia , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Hypocalcemia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Endocrine ; 72(1): 1-11, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1141496

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vitamin D and its deficiency have recently been suspected to be involved in increased susceptibility and negative outcomes of COVID-19. This assumption was based on the well known immunomodulatory actions of vitamin D and on the consistent finding of low levels of 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Moreover, several studies reported a correlation between 25OHD levels and different clinical outcomes of the disease. AIM: Aim of the current review was to approach the topic of vitamin D and COVID-19 from a different perspective summarizing the data which led to the evidence of the existence of an endocrine phenotype of COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: This review analyzed in the light of the current knowledge the possibility that several endocrine manifestations of COVID-19 could be holistically interpreted in the context of an inadequate vitamin D status.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vitamin D Deficiency , Humans , Phenotype , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications , Vitamins
17.
Rev Endocr Metab Disord ; 22(1): 145, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1037296
19.
Endocrine ; 71(2): 273-280, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1014226

ABSTRACT

With most global healthcare resources focused on COVID-19, altered resource allocation is disrupting the continuum of care for chronic endocrine conditions, including acromegaly. In order to assess the effects of COVID-19 on care of patients with acromegaly, we conducted an international online survey of endocrinologists. The questionnaire was drafted by a Steering Committee of acromegaly experts and covered both respondent demographics, contact and communication with patients, and patient care. Respondent awareness was generated through social media campaigns and the survey completed online using Google forms. The majority of endocrinologists who responded (N = 84) were based in Europe (67.9%) and were female (58.3%). Slightly more than half of respondents worked in a specialized pituitary center (52.4%) and a large minority cared for more than 50 acromegaly patients (47.6%). Most respondents (85.7%) indicated surgery was their first-line treatment, with only 14.3% indicating medical therapy as a first-choice treatment option. One-third (33.3%) of respondents reported having delayed a planned surgery due to a lack of COVID-19 testing provision and 54.8% due to a lack of surgical provision; 19.1% indicated that a lack of personal protective equipment had reduced their ability to treat patients with acromegaly. Just 21.4% of respondents reported no negative effects from the pandemic on diagnostic practice patterns, and just 19.1% reported no negative effect on patient follow-up practices. Many respondents (55.9%) indicated that remote methods had improved their ability to communicate with their patients and 69.0% indicated that they would continue to use methods of consultation necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Our data suggest the COVID-19 pandemic is substantially affecting the care of acromegaly. However, these results also suggest that endocrinologists are embracing aspects of the 'new normal' to create a novel continuum of care better suited to the presumed post-COVID-19 environment. The goal of these changes must be both to improve care while shielding patients from more severe involvement in concomitant acute illnesses such COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acromegaly/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Acromegaly/therapy , Communicable Disease Control , Disease Management , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL