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1.
Journal of Urology ; 207(SUPPL 5):e47, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1886480

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: Covid-19 caused major disruptions to cancer diagnosis and treatment. We aimed to evaluate the longitudinal disruption to prostate cancer management. METHODS: We completed a prospective service evaluation from 01/09/2019 to 31/08/2021 of all referrals, investigations, and treatments for prostate cancer at a single centre. The first UK Covid-19 lockdown occurred from 23/03/20 to 04/07/2020: monthly data for the time period before, during, and after the first UK lockdown were compared using ANOVA and Tukey HSD. RESULTS: We identified 4501 patients for inclusion. There was a profound decrease in all aspects of prostate cancer management during the first lockdown period. For pre-lockdown, lockdown, and postlockdown periods respectively, the mean monthly rates were: 256 v 125 v 363 PSA tests (p=0.0003);86 v 40 v 79 two-week-wait referrals (p=0.0005);62 v 18 v 54 MRI imaging for possible cancer (p<0.0001);32 v 15 v 36 diagnoses (p=0.002);17 v 9 v 14 prostatectomies (p=0.06). In the period after the first lockdown, despite the previous drop, we did not observe an increase in the number of referrals, MRI imaging, diagnoses, or treatment required (including active monitoring, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, prostatectomy, and palliative care) in comparison to pre-lockdown levels (all p>0.05). However, interestingly, we did see an increase in the number of PSA tests performed (p=0.04), which continued through the two subsequent UK lockdowns. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first study to provide an overview of the impact of COVID-19 national lockdowns on the whole prostate cancer management pathway - from initial referral to final treatment. Despite the disruption to prostate cancer management during the first UK Covid-19 lockdown leading to a decrease in referrals, diagnoses and treatment in the context of reduced PSA testing, we have not seen a subsequent increase in these numbers after lockdown despite a rise in PSA testing. The rise in the number PSA tests performed post-lockdown may suggest a degree of compensatory PSA observation in the community. (Figure Presented).

2.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-330329

ABSTRACT

Introduction Shared characteristics between COVID-19 and pulmonary fibrosis, including symptoms, genetic architecture, and circulating biomarkers, suggests interstitial lung disease (ILD) development may be associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Methods The UKILD Post-COVID study planned interim analysis was designed to stratify risk groups and estimate the prevalence of Post-COVID Interstitial Lung Damage (ILDam) using the Post-HOSPitalisation COVID-19 (PHOSP-COVID) Study. Demographics, radiological patterns and missing data were assessed descriptively. Bayes binomial regression was used to estimate the risk ratio of persistent lung damage >10% involvement in linked, clinically indicated CT scans. Indexing thresholds of percent predicted DLco, chest X-ray findings and severity of admission were used to generate risk strata. Number of cases within strata were used to estimate the amount of suspected Post-COVID ILDam. Results A total 3702 people were included in the UKILD interim cohort, 2406 completed an early follow-up research visit within 240 days of discharge and 1296 had follow-up through routine clinical review. We linked the cohort to 87 clinically indicated CTs with visually scored radiological patterns (median 119 days;interquartile range 83 to 155, max 240), of which 74 people had ILDam. ILDam was associated with abnormal chest X-ray (RR 1.21 95%CrI 1.05;1.40), percent predicted DLco<80% (RR 1.25 95%CrI 1.00;1.56) and severe admission (RR 1.27 95%CrI 1.07;1.55). A risk index based on these features suggested 6.9% of the interim cohort had moderate to very-high risk of Post-COVID ILDam. Comparable radiological patterns were observed in repeat scans >90 days in a subset of participants. Conclusion These interim data highlight that ILDam was not uncommon in clinically indicated thoracic CT up to 8 months following SARS-CoV-2 hospitalisation. Whether the ILDam will progress to ILD is currently unknown, however health services should radiologically and physiologically monitor individuals who have Post-COVID ILDam risk factors.

3.
Clin Radiol ; 77(2): 148-155, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611681

ABSTRACT

AIM: To determine if there is a difference in radiological, biochemical, or clinical severity between patients infected with Alpha-variant SARS-CoV-2 compared with those infected with pre-existing strains, and to determine if the computed tomography (CT) severity score (CTSS) for COVID-19 pneumonitis correlates with clinical severity and can prognosticate outcomes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blinded CTSS scoring was applied to 137 hospital patients who had undergone both CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) and whole-genome sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 within 14 days of CTPA between 1/12/20-5/1/21. RESULTS: There was no evidence of a difference in imaging severity on CTPA, viral load, clinical parameters of severity, or outcomes between Alpha and preceding variants. CTSS on CTPA strongly correlates with clinical and biochemical severity at the time of CTPA, and with patient outcomes. Classifying CTSS into a binary value of "high" and "low", with a cut-off score of 14, patients with a high score have a significantly increased risk of deterioration, as defined by subsequent admission to critical care or death (multivariate hazard ratio [HR] 2.76, p<0.001), and hospital length of stay (17.4 versus 7.9 days, p<0.0001). CONCLUSION: There was no evidence of a difference in radiological severity of Alpha variant infection compared with pre-existing strains. High CTSS applied to CTPA is associated with increased risk of COVID-19 severity and poorer clinical outcomes and may be of use particularly in settings where CT is not performed for diagnosis of COVID-19 but rather is used following clinical deterioration.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Computed Tomography Angiography , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , Whole Genome Sequencing , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Critical Care , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Time Factors , United Kingdom , Viral Load
4.
Eur Radiol ; 32(4): 2639-2649, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491097

ABSTRACT

This document from the European Society of Thoracic Imaging (ESTI) and the European Society of Radiology (ESR) discusses the role of imaging in the long-term follow-up of COVID-19 patients, to define which patients may benefit from imaging, and what imaging modalities and protocols should be used. Insights into imaging features encountered on computed tomography (CT) scans and potential pitfalls are discussed and possible areas for future review and research are also included. KEY POINTS: • Post-COVID-19 pneumonia changes are mainly consistent with prior organizing pneumonia and are likely to disappear within 12 months of recovery from the acute infection in the majority of patients. • At present, with the longest series of follow-up examinations reported not exceeding 12 months, the development of persistent or progressive fibrosis in at least some individuals cannot yet be excluded. • Residual ground glass opacification may be associated with persisting bronchial dilatation and distortion, and might be termed "fibrotic-like changes" probably consistent with prior organizing pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pneumonia , Radiology , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
6.
Clin Radiol ; 75(8): 599-605, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611968

ABSTRACT

AIM: To determine the incidence of possible COVID-19-related lung changes on preoperative screening computed tomography (CT) for COVID-19 and how their findings influenced decision-making. To also to determine whether the patients were managed as COVID-19 patients after their imaging findings, and the proportion who had SARS-CoV2 reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective study was undertaken of consecutive patients having imaging prior to urgent elective surgery (n=156) or acute abdominal imaging (n=283). Lung findings were categorised according to the British Society of Thoracic Imaging (BSTI) guidelines. RT-PCR testing, management, and outcomes were determined from the electronic patient records. RESULTS: 3% (13/439) of CT examinations demonstrated findings of classic/probable COVID-19 pneumonia, whilst 4% (19/439) had findings indeterminate for COVID-19. Of the total cohort, 1.6% (7/439) subsequently had confirmed RT-PCR-positive COVID-19. Importantly, all the patients with a normal chest or alternative diagnoses on CT who had PCR testing within the next 7 days, had a negative RT-PCR (92/407). There was a change in surgical outcome in 6% (10/156) of the elective surgical cohort with no change to surgical management was demonstrated in the acute abdominal emergency cohort requiring surgery (2/283). CONCLUSION: There was a 7% (32/439) incidence of potential COVID-19-related lung changes in patients having preoperative CT. Although this altered surgical management in the elective surgical cohort, no change to surgical management was demonstrated in the acute abdominal emergency cohort requiring surgery.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Preoperative Care/methods , Radiography, Thoracic/methods , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom , Young Adult
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