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1.
HemaSphere ; 6:373-375, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2032169

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with red blood cell disorders (RBCD), are likely to be at increased risk of complications from SARS-Co-2 (Coid-19), but eidence in this population is scarce due to its low frequency and heterogeneous distribution. Aims: ERN-EuroBloodNet, the European Reference Network in rare hematological disorders, established a European registry to determine the impact of COVID-19 on RBCD patients and identify risk factors predicting seere outcomes. Methods: The ERN-EuroBloodNet registry was established in March 2020 by VHIR based on Redcap software in accordance with the Regulation (EU) 2016/679 on personal data. The local Research Ethics Committee confirmed that the exceptional case of the pandemic justifies the waier of informed consent. Eligible patients had confirmed RBCD and COVID-19. Data collected included demographics, diagnosis, comorbidities, treatments, and COVID-19 symptoms and management. For analysis of COVID-19 seerity, two groups were established 1) Mild: asymptomatic or mild symptoms without clinical pneumonia and 2) Seere: pneumonia requiring oxygen/respiratory support and/or admission to intensie care unit. Continuous ariables were compared using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test or Kruskall Wallis test, while categorical ariables were analyzed using the Chi-square test or Fisher's Exact test. Releant factors influencing disease or seerity were examined by the logistic regression adjusted for age. Results: As of February 25, 2022, 42 medical centers from 10 EU countries had registered 428 patients: 212 Sickle cell disease (SCD), 186 Thalassemia major and intermedia (THAL). The mean age of SCD was lower (22y) than of THAL (39.4y). Splenectomy and comorbidities were higher in THAL (51.4% and 61,3%) than in SCD (16,3% and 46,8%) (p<0.001, p=0.004). Age and BMI correlated with COVID-19 seerity, as described in the general population (p=0.003, p<0.001). Fig 1 shows age distribution and COVID-19 seerity by disease seerity groups. The mean age for seere COVID-19 was lower in patients with seere SCD (SS/SB0 s SC/SB+: 23y s 67.5y) and THAL (major s intermedia: 43.5 s 51.3y) (p<0.001). Potential risk factors such as eleated ferritin, current chelation or history of splenectomy did not confer additional risk for deeloping seere COVID-19 in any patient group. Only diabetes as a comorbidity correlated with seerity grade in SCD (p=0.01) and hypertension in THAL (p=0.009). While seere COVID-19 infection in SCD was associated with both ACS (p<0.001) and kidney failure requiring treatment (p<0.001), this was not predicted by a history of preious ACS or kidney disease in steady state. Oerall, 14,6% RBC patients needed oxygen/respiratory support, 4% were admitted to ICU with an oerall mortality rate of 1%, much lower than reported in other similar cohorts. Hospital Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Spain;54 Clinical Pharmacology Serice, Hospital Uniersitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain;55 Vall d'Hebron Institut de Recerca, Barcelona, Spain;56 Diision of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, American Uniersity of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon;57 UOC Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Uniersity of Padoa, Padoa, Italy;58 Department of Haematology, Oxford Uniersity Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, United Kingdom;59 Translational Research in Child and Adolescent Cancer, Vall d'Hebron Institut de Recerca, Barcelona, Spain Background: Patients with red blood cell disorders (RBCD), are likely to be at increased risk of complications from SARS-Co-2 (Coid-19), but eidence in this population is scarce due to its low frequency and heterogeneous distribution. Aims: ERN-EuroBloodNet, the European Reference Network in rare hematological disorders, established a European registry to determine the impact of COVID-19 on RBCD patients and identify risk factors predicting seere outcomes. Methods: The ERN-EuroBloodNet registry was established in March 2020 by VHIR based on Redcap software in accordance with the Regulation (EU) 2016/679 on personal data. The local Research Ethics Committee confirm d that the exceptional case of the pandemic justifies the waier of informed consent. Eligible patients had confirmed RBCD and COVID-19. Data collected included demographics, diagnosis, comorbidities, treatments, and COVID-19 symptoms and management. For analysis of COVID-19 seerity, two groups were established 1) Mild: asymptomatic or mild symptoms without clinical pneumonia and 2) Seere: pneumonia requiring oxygen/respiratory support and/or admission to intensie care unit. Continuous ariables were compared using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test or Kruskall Wallis test, while categorical ariables were analyzed using the Chi-square test or Fisher's Exact test. Releant factors influencing disease or seerity were examined by the logistic regression adjusted for age. Results: As of February 25, 2022, 42 medical centers from 10 EU countries had registered 428 patients: 212 Sickle cell disease (SCD), 186 Thalassemia major and intermedia (THAL). The mean age of SCD was lower (22y) than of THAL (39.4y). Splenectomy and comorbidities were higher in THAL (51.4% and 61,3%) than in SCD (16,3% and 46,8%) (p<0.001, p=0.004). Age and BMI correlated with COVID-19 seerity, as described in the general population (p=0.003, p<0.001). Fig 1 shows age distribution and COVID-19 seerity by disease seerity groups. The mean age for seere COVID-19 was lower in patients with seere SCD (SS/SB0 s SC/SB+: 23y s 67.5y) and THAL (major s intermedia: 43.5 s 51.3y) (p<0.001). Potential risk factors such as eleated ferritin, current chelation or history of splenectomy did not confer additional risk for deeloping seere COVID-19 in any patient group. Only diabetes as a comorbidity correlated with seerity grade in SCD (p=0.01) and hypertension in THAL (p=0.009). While seere COVID-19 infection in SCD was associated with both ACS (p<0.001) and kidney failure requiring treatment (p<0.001), this was not predicted by a history of preious ACS or kidney disease in steady state. Oerall, 14,6% RBC patients needed oxygen/respiratory support, 4% were admitted to ICU with an oerall mortality rate of 1%, much lower than reported in other similar cohorts. Summary/Conclusion: Results obtained so far show that seere COVID-19 occurs at younger ages in more aggressie forms of SCD and THAL. Current preentie approaches focus on age oer disease seerity. Our data highlights the risk of seere COVID-19 infection in some young patients, particularly those with SS/SB0 SCD, suggesting that immunization should be considered in this pediatric group as well. Results between similar sized cohorts of RBCD patients ary between each other and those presented here, highlighting the importance of collecting all of these small cohorts together to ensure adequate statistical power so that definitie risk factors can be reliably identified and used to guide management of patients with these rare disorders in the light of the ongoing pandemic. (Figure Presented).

2.
HemaSphere ; 6:368-370, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2032134

ABSTRACT

Background: Philadelphia-negatie chronic myeloproliferatie neoplasms (MPN) typically incur high rates of thrombosis and infections and cytoreductie drugs may modulate such risks. Aims: The present analysis aims at assessing the seerity and outcomes of MPN facing coronairus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Hence, we aimed to assess the impact of immunosuppressie agents and comorbidity burden in COVID- 19 outcome. Methods: The EPICOVIDEHA registry is an online surey (www.clinicalsureys.net) that has collected since April 2020 until January 2022 5,445 cases of COVID-19 in indiiduals with baseline haematological malignancies (Salmanton-García et al, 2021 Hemasphere) The surey is promoted by the European Hematology Association - Infectious Diseases Working Party (EHA-IDWP) and has been approed centrally by the Institutional Reiew Board and Ethics Committee of Fondazione Policlinico Uniersitario A. Gemelli - IRCCS - Uniersità Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy (Study ID: 3226). Results: Oerall, 308 patients (5.6%) with MPN were obsered for a median of 102 days (IQR: 21-223, range 22-97) after COVID-19 diagnosis. Median age at infection was 69 years (IQR: 58-77, range 22-97) and at least one comorbidity was reported from most of the indiiduals (62.6%, n = 193). A large portion of patients had a history of cardiopathy (n=109, 35.4%), diabetes (n=40, 15.9%), or chronic pulmonary disease (n=44, 14.3%). Myelofibrosis (MF) (n=140, 45.4%) was the most prealent baseline malignancy, with 18 MF patients (12.9%) reporting 3 or more comorbidities. Out of the whole cohort, 72 patients (42.8% of MF) receied immunosuppressige therapies including steroids, immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) or JAK-inhibitors. Hospitalization and consecutie admission to intensie care unit was required for 187 (60.7%) and 45 (24%) patients, respectiely. At multiariate logistic regression, Hospital admission was predicted by age >70 years (OR 2.809;95% CI 1.651-4.779), exposure to immunosuppressie therapies (OR 2.802;95% CI 1.5380-5.103) and comorbidity burden. During the study follow-up (median 101 days;range 21-222) 84 patients deceased after a median time of 14 days (IQR: 8-49, range 0-457) since COVID-19 diagnosis. The fatality rate (FR) decreased from 40.3% (50 out of 124) in the first two quarters of year 2020 to 15.8% (3 out of 19) in the first two quarters of year 2021 (p<0.05). Death was principally attributable to COVID-19 in 58 patients (69.0%) and contributable by COVID-19 in 15 (17.9%). FR was particularly high (54 out of 140, 38.6%) in MF patients and in patients receiing immunosuppressie agents (32 out of 86, 37%). Moreoer, FR increased from 13.0% in indiiduals with no comorbidity to 36.0% and 62.1% in those with >2 or >3 comorbidities, respectiely. More specifically, three comorbidities independently increased the FR: chronic cardiopathy (HR 1.653;95%CI 1.017-2.687), chronic pulmonary disease (HR 1.847;95% CI 1.097-3.109), and diabetes mellitus (HR 1.712;95% CI 1.006-2.914). A heay comorbidity burden, namely 3 or more comorbidities (HR 2.956;95% CI 1.403-6.227), adanced age, namely >70 years (HR .809;95% CI 1.651-4.779), myelofibrosis (HR 2.501;95% CI 1.384-4.519), and ICU admission (HR 2.669;95% CI 1.641-4.342) independently predicted FR. (MF) (n=140, 45.4%) was the most prealent baseline malignancy, with 18 MF patients (12.9%) reporting 3 or more comorbidities. Out of the whole cohort, 72 patients (42.8% of MF) receied immunosuppressige therapies including steroids, immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) or JAK-inhibitors. Hospitalization and consecutie admission to intensie care unit was required for 187 (60.7%) and 45 (24%) patients, respectiely. At multiariate logistic regression, Hospital admission was predicted by age >70 years (OR 2.809;95% CI 1.651-4.779), exposure to immunosuppressie therapies (OR 2.802;95% CI 1.5380-5.103) and comorbidity burden. During the study follow-up (median 101 days;range 21-222) 84 patients deceased after a median time of 14 days (IQR: 8-49, range 0-457) since COVID-19 diagnosis. The fatality rate (FR) dec eased from 40.3% (50 out of 124) in the first two quarters of year 2020 to 15.8% (3 out of 19) in the first two quarters of year 2021 (p<0.05). Death was principally attributable to COVID-19 in 58 patients (69.0%) and contributable by COVID-19 in 15 (17.9%). FR was particularly high (54 out of 140, 38.6%) in MF patients and in patients receiing immunosuppressie agents (32 out of 86, 37%). Moreoer, FR increased from 13.0% in indiiduals with no comorbidity to 36.0% and 62.1% in those with >2 or >3 comorbidities, respectiely. More specifically, three comorbidities independently increased the FR: chronic cardiopathy (HR 1.653;95%CI 1.017-2.687), chronic pulmonary disease (HR 1.847;95% CI 1.097-3.109), and diabetes mellitus (HR 1.712;95% CI 1.006-2.914). A heay comorbidity burden, namely 3 or more comorbidities (HR 2.956;95% CI 1.403-6.227), adanced age, namely >70 years (HR .809;95% CI 1.651-4.779), myelofibrosis (HR 2.501;95% CI 1.384-4.519), and ICU admission (HR 2.669;95% CI 1.641-4.342) independently predicted FR. Summary/Conclusion: COVID-19 infection led to a particularly dismal outcome in patients exposed to immunosuppressie agents and in those with chronic heart or pulmonary diseases, or diabetes. These data allow to tailor future strategies for preenting seere COVID-19 in MPN patients. (Table Presented).

3.
HemaSphere ; 6:365-367, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2032120

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with lymphoproliferatie diseases (LPD) appear particularly ulnerable to SARS-CoV-2 infection, partly because of the effects of the anti-neoplastic regimens (chemotherapy, signaling pathway inhibitors, and monoclonal antibodies) on the immune system. The real impact of COVID-19 on the life expectancy of patients with different subtypes of lymphoma and targeted treatment is still unknown. Aims: The aim of this study is to describe and analyse the outcome of COVID-19 patients with underlying LPD treated with targeted drugs such as monoclonal antibodies (obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, brentuximab, niolumab or pembrolizumab), BTK inhibitors (ibrutinib, acalabrutinib), PI3K inhibitors (idelalisib), BCL2 inhibitors (enetoclax) and IMIDs, (lenalidomide). Methods: The surey was supported by EPICOVIDEHA registry. Adult patients with baseline CLL or non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) treated with targeted drugs and laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 diagnosed between January 2020 and January 2022 were selected. Results: The study included 368 patients (CLL n=205, 55.7%;NHL n=163, 44.3%) treated with targeted drugs (Table 1). Median follow-up was 70.5 days (range 19-159). Most used targeted drugs were ITKs (51.1%), anti-CD20 other than rituximab (16%), BCL2 inhibitors (7.3%) and lenalidomide (7.9%). Of note, only 16.0% of the patients were accinated with 2 or more doses of accine at the onset of COVID-19. Pulmonary symptoms were present at diagnosis in 244 patients (66.2%). Seere COVID-19 was obsered in 47.8 % patients while 21.7% were admitted to to intensie care unit (ICU), being 55 (26.8%) CLL patients and 25 (15.3%) NHL patients. More comorbidities were reported in patients with seere-critical COVID-19 compared to those with mild- asymptomatic infection (p=0.002). This difference was releant in patients with chronic heart diseases (p=0.005). Oerall, 134 patients (36.4%) died. Primary cause of death was COVID-19 in 92 patients (68.7%), LPD in 14 patients (10.4%), and a combination of both in 28 patients (20.9%).Mortality was 24.2% (89/368) at day 30 and 34.5%(127/368) at day 200. After a Cox multiariable regression age >75 years (p<0.001, HR 1.030), actie malignancy (p=0.011, HR 1.574) and admission to ICU (p<0.00, HR 4.624) were obsered as risk factors. Surial in patients admitted to ICU was 33.7% (LLC 38.1%, NHL 24%). Mortality rate decreased depending on accination status, being 34.2% in not accinated patients, 15.9-18% with one or two doses, decreasing to 9.7% in patients with booster dose (p<0.001). There was no difference in OS in NLH s CLL patients (p=0.344), nor in ITKs s no ITKs treated patients (p=0.987). Additionally, mortality rate dropped from the first semester 2020 (41.3%) to last semester 2021 (25%). Summary/Conclusion: - Our results confirm that patients with B--mallignancies treatted with targeted drugs hae a high risk off seere infection (47.8%) and mortality (36.4%) from COVID-19. - Pressence of comorbidities,, especially heart disease,, is a risk factor for seere COVIID--19 infection in ourr series. - Age >75 years,, actie mallignancy att COVIID--19 onset and ICU admission were mortality risk factors. - COVIID--19 acination was a protectie factor for mortality,, een iin this popullation wiitth humorall immunity impairment. - The learning cure in the management of the infection throughout the pandemiic and the deelopmentt off COVIID--19 treatments showed benefit in this partticullarlly ullnerablle popullation? (Table Presented).

4.
HemaSphere ; 6:2679-2681, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2032097

ABSTRACT

Background: Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA) during pregnancy is a rare finding, and few is known about maternal and foetal outcomes. AIHA may either develop or relapse during gestation and postpartum or be an issue in a patient on active therapy who becomes pregnant. AIHA management during pregnancy and lactation is not standardized and drug use is often limited by safety concerns. Aims: We studied AIHA impact on pregnancy focusing on disease severity, treatment need and maternal/foetal outcome. Methods: Through a multicentric retrospective cohort study, we identified 38 pregnancies occurred in 28 women from 1997 to 2021 in 10 European centres in Italy, Denmark, France, the Netherlands, USA, and Spain. All included patients had a previous AIHA history or developed/exacerbated AIHA during gestation or postpartum. AIHA was classified according to the direct antiglobulin test. Results: We registered 18 warm AIHA (10 IgG;8 IgG+C3d), 2 cold agglutinin disease, 3 mixed and 5 atypical forms (Table 1). Evans syndrome (i.e., association of AIHA and immune thrombocytopenia or neutropenia) was present in 4. Mean age at AIHA diagnosis was 27 (3-39) and at pregnancy 32 (21-41) years. AIHA diagnosis predated pregnancy in 15 women and had required at least 1 therapy line in all of them, and >2 lines in 12 (rituximab, N=7;cytotoxic immunosuppressants, N=6;splenectomy, N=5). Among these 15 patients, 6 had a relapse during pregnancy, 3 during postpartum and 9 were on active treatment at the time of pregnancy (steroids, N=8;cyclosporine, N=1;azathioprine, N=1;the latter stopped after positive pregnancy test). A patient with a previous AIHA, relapsed as immune thrombocytopenic purpura during pregnancy. Further 8 patients had an AIHA onset during gestation and 2 postpartum. A patient had AIHA onset during the postpartum of the 1st pregnancy and relapsed during the 2nd one. In the 20 women experiencing AIHA during pregnancy/postpartum, median Hb and LDH levels were 6,4 g/dL (3,1 - 8,7) and 588 UI/L (269-1631), respectively. Management consisted in blood transfusions (N=10) and prompt establishment of steroid therapy+/-IVIG (N=20), all with response (complete N=13, partial N=7). After delivery, rituximab was necessary in 4 patients and cyclosporine was added in one. Anti-thrombotic prophylaxis was given in 7 patients. Overall, we registered 10 obstetric complications (10/38, 26%), including 4 early miscarriages, a premature rupture of membranes, a placental detachment, 2 preeclampsia, a postpartum infection and a biliary colic. Apart from the case of biliary colic and one of the two cases of preeclampsia, 8/10 complications occurred during active haemolysis and treatment for AIHA. Nine foetal adverse events (9/38, 24%) were reported: a transitory respiratory distress of the new-born in a mother with active AIHA, 3 cases of foetal growth restriction, a preterm birth, an infant reporting neurologic sequelae, a case of AIHA of the new-born requiring intravenous immunoglobulins, blood transfusions and plasma exchange, and 2 perinatal deaths. The latter both occurred in women on active AIHA therapy and were secondary to a massive placental detachment and a symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection. (Figure Presented ) Summary/Conclusion: AIHA developing/reactivating during pregnancy or postpartum is rare (about 5%) but mainly severe requiring steroid therapy and transfusions. Importantly, severe maternal and foetal complications may occur in up to 26% of cases mostly associated with active disease, pinpointing the importance of maintaining a high level of awareness. Passive maternal autoantibodies transfer to the foetus seems a rare event.

6.
Blood ; 138:4058, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582388

ABSTRACT

[Formula presented] PV, NR and MMP contributed equally Introduction Patients with red blood cell disorders (RBCD), chronic life threating multisystemic disorders in their severe forms, are likely to be at increased risk of complications from SARS-Cov-2 (Covid-19), but evidence in this population is scarce due to its low frequency and heterogeneous distribution. ERN-EuroBloodNet, the European Reference Network in rare hematological disorders, established a European registry to determine the impact of COVID-19 on RBCD patients and identify risk factors predicting severe outcomes. Methods The ERN-EuroBloodNet registry was established in March 2020 by Vall d'Hebron Research Institute based on REDcap software in accordance with the Regulation (EU) 2016/679 on personal data. The local Research Ethics Committee confirmed that the exceptional case of the pandemic justifies the waiver of informed consent. The ERN-EuroBloodNet registry on RBCD and COVID-19 is endorsed by the European Hematology Association (EHA). Eligible patients had confirmed RBCD and COVID-19. Data collected included demographics, diagnosis, comorbidities, treatments, and COVID-19 (severity grade, clinical manifestations, acute events, treatments, hospitalization, intensive care unit, death). For analysis of COVID-19 severity, two groups were established 1) Mild: asymptomatic or mild symptoms without clinical pneumonia and 2) Severe: pneumonia requiring oxygen/respiratory support and/or admission to intensive care unit. Continuous variables were compared using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test or Kruskall Wallis test, while categorical variables were analyzed using the Chi-square test or Fisher's Exact test. Relevant factors influencing disease or severity were examined by the logistic regression adjusted for age. Results As of June 2021, 42 medical centers from 10 EU countries had registered 373 patients: 191 Sickle cell disease (SCD), 156 Thalassemia major and intermedia (THAL) and 26 other RBCD. 84% of the SCD patients were reported by Spain, Belgium, Italy and The Netherlands and 92% of the THAL patients by Italy and Greece. The mean age of SCD was lower (22.5y) than of THAL (39.6y) with pediatric population accounting for 50.5% in SCD and 9% in THAL (p <0.001). Splenectomy and comorbidities were higher in THAL (51.3% and 65.8%) than in SCD (16% and 48.1%) (p<0.001, p=0.002). Age and BMI correlated with COVID-19 severity, as described in the general population (p=0.002, p<0.001). Fig 1 shows age distribution and COVID-19 severity by disease severity groups. The mean age for severe COVID-19 was lower in patients with severe SCD (SS/SB0 vs SC/SB+: 23.3y vs 67.5y) and THAL (major vs intermedia: 43.5 vs 51.3y) (p<0.001). Potential risk factors such as elevated ferritin, current chelation or history of splenectomy did not confer additional risk for developing severe COVID-19 in any patient group. Only diabetes as a comorbidity correlated with severity grade in SCD (p=0.011) and hypertension in THAL (p=0.014). While severe COVID-19 infection in SCD was associated with both ACS (p<0.001) and kidney failure requiring treatment (p=0.001), this was not predicted by a history of previous ACS or kidney disease in steady state. Overall, 14.8% RBC patients needed oxygen/respiratory support, 4.4% were admitted to ICU with an overall mortality rate of 0.8% (no deaths were registered in pediatric age), much lower than reported in other similar cohorts. Discussion Results obtained so far show that severe COVID-19 occurs at younger ages in more aggressive forms of SCD and THAL. Current preventive approaches (shielding, vaccinations) focus on age over disease severity. Our data highlights the risk of severe COVID-19 infection in some young patients, particularly those with SS/SB0 SCD, suggesting that immunization should be considered in this pediatric group as well. Results between similar sized cohorts of RBCD patients vary between each other and those presented here, highlighting the importance of collecting all of these small cohorts together to ensure adequate statistical p wer so that definitive risk factors (eg. age, genotype, comorbidities) can be reliably identified and used to guide management of patients with these rare disorders in the light of the ongoing pandemic. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Longo: Bristol Myers Squibb: Honoraria;BlueBird Bio: Honoraria. Bardón-Cancho: Novartis Oncology Spain: Research Funding. Flevari: PROTAGONIST COMPANY: Research Funding;ADDMEDICA: Consultancy, Research Funding;BMS: Research Funding;IMARA COMPANY: Research Funding;NOVARTIS COMPANY: Research Funding. Voskaridou: BMS: Consultancy, Research Funding;IMARA: Research Funding;NOVARTIS: Research Funding;ADDMEDICA: Consultancy, Research Funding;GENESIS: Consultancy, Research Funding;PROTAGONIST: Research Funding. Biemond: GBT: Honoraria, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau;Novartis: Honoraria, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau;Novo Nordisk: Honoraria;Celgene: Honoraria;Sanquin: Research Funding. Nur: Celgene: Speakers Bureau;Roche: Speakers Bureau;Novartis: Research Funding, Speakers Bureau. Beneitez-Pastor: Agios: Honoraria;Alexion: Honoraria;Novartis: Honoraria;Forma Therapeutics: Honoraria. Pepe: Chiesi Farmaceutici S.p.A: Other: no profit support;Bayer S.p.A.: Other: no profit support. de Montalembert: Novartis: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Addmedica: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;BlueBirdBio: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Vertex: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Glenthøj: Agios: Consultancy;Novo Nordisk: Honoraria;Novartis: Consultancy;Alexion: Research Funding;Bluebird Bio: Consultancy;Bristol Myers Squibb: Consultancy;Saniona: Research Funding;Sanofi: Research Funding. Benghiat: Novartis: Consultancy;BMS: Consultancy. Labarque: Novartis: Consultancy;Bayer: Consultancy;Sobi: Consultancy;NovoNordisk: Consultancy;Octapharma: Consultancy. Diamantidis: Genesis Pharma: Honoraria;Uni-Pharma: Honoraria;Bristol Myers Squibb: Consultancy;IONIS Pharmaceuticals: Research Funding;NOVARTIS, Genesis Pharma SA: Research Funding. Kerkhoffs: Sanofi: Research Funding;Terumo BCT: Research Funding. Iolascon: Celgene: Other: Advisory Board;Bluebird Bio: Other: Advisory Board. Taher: Vifor Pharma: Consultancy, Research Funding;Agios Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy;Ionis Pharmaceuticals: Consultancy, Research Funding;Bristol Myers Squibb: Consultancy, Research Funding;Novartis: Consultancy, Research Funding. Colombatti: Novartis: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Global Blood Therapeutics: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Novonordisk: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Forma Therapeutics: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Addmedica: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;BlueBirdBio: Research Funding. Mañú Pereira: Novartis: Research Funding;Agios Pharmaceuticals: Research Funding.

7.
Acta Oncol ; 60(7): 859-865, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221269

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cancer patients are vulnerable to infections, are older and often have comorbidities in comparison to the general population, which increases the risk for severe outcomes related to COVID-19 diagnosis. METHODS: This study is a prospective, nationwide study in patients with solid cancer and SARS-CoV-2 infection included between 10 March to 15 June 2020. Patient's baseline characteristics were collected. The study's primary outcome was overall survival within 30 days of verified SARS-CoV-2 infection. Secondary outcomes were hospital admission, admission to an ICU, and need for supplemental oxygen. RESULTS: A total of 112 patients with a cancer diagnosis and verified SARS-CoV-2 infection were identified. After one month of follow up, hospitalization was required for 54% (n = 61) and 21% of the patients had died and 14 of the 23 deceased cancer patients were ≥70 years. Most patients were classified with mild COVID-19 symptoms (66%, n = 74); however, 48% (n = 23) of the ≥70-year-olds patients were classified with severe or critical COVID-19 symptoms. Among the total study population, 61% (n = 68) had comorbidities and comorbidity were more frequently observed among the deceased (91%, n = 21) and older cancer patients (≥70 years, 81%, n = 39). CONCLUSIONS: Acknowledging the low sample size in this study, our work shows that age and comorbidities, but not recent cytotoxic therapy, are associated with adverse outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection for patients with solid cancer. Particularly, patients with progressive disease seem to be at greater risk of a fatal outcome from COVID-19.HighlightsAge, performance status, and comorbidities are strong predictors of adverse outcome in cancer patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection.Patients with progressive cancer disease seem to be at greater risk of a fatal outcome from COVID-19.Recent cytotoxic therapy, however, did not seem to be associated with increased risk for adverse outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection for patients with solid cancer.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Aged , COVID-19 Testing , Cohort Studies , Denmark/epidemiology , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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