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1.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 30(1 SUPPL):357-358, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1880895

ABSTRACT

Background: After COVID-19 shelter-in-place (SIP) orders on 3/16/2020, viral suppression (VS) rates initially decreased within a safety-net HIV clinic in San Francisco, with greater decreases among homeless people living with HIV (PLWH). We sought to understand if (1) proactive outreach to provide social services, (2) scaling up of in-person visits for most patients and drop-in visits at the clinic, and (3) expansion of housing programs could reverse this decline. Methods: We assessed VS 24 months before and 13 months after SIP using mixed-effects logistic regression and propensity score methods, followed by interrupted time series (ITS) analysis to examine changes in the rate of viral suppression per month. Loss to follow-up was assessed via active clinic outreach and tracing using Kaplan-Meier methods. Results: The cohort contained 1816 patients with a median age of 51;12% female, 14% unstably housed, and 15% with CD4+-cell counts <200 cells/mm3. The adjusted odds of VS increased 1.34-fold following the intervention (95% CI: 1.21-1.46), with similar results using inverse probability weighting (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.31;95% CI: 1.17-1.46). Results from the ITS analysis show that the odds of VS continuously increased by 1.05-fold per month over the post-intervention period (95% CI: 1.01-1.08, Figure). Proactive phone outreach successfully reached 90.0% of the clinic to offer services. The one-year cumulative loss to follow-up rate was 3.2% (95% CI: 2.5-3.9%). The proportion of total attended visits that were telephone visits decreased from a maximum of 64.9% to a minimum of 10.1% at the end of the analysis period. The rate of viral load monitoring decreased by 15% after the institution of SIP (95% CI: 0.83-0.88). Among homeless PLWH, the AOR for VS was 1.70 (95% CI: 1.24-2.34) and there was a 5.9% increase in VS per month using ITS methods (95% CI: 1.0-12.3%). Conclusion: After an initial destabilization in VS in a large safety-net clinic following SIP orders, the VS rate increased following scale-up of in-person visits, clinic outreach to patients, intensification of social services during this time, and access to COVID-related housing programs. The loss to follow-up rate was similar or lower compared to prior years. Maintaining in-person care for underserved patients, with flexible telemedicine options, along with provision of social services and permanent expansion of housing assistance programs, will be needed to support VS among underserved populations during the COVID-19 pandemic.

2.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 30(1 SUPPL):247-248, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1880706

ABSTRACT

Background: The biologic mechanisms underlying neurologic post-acute-sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC) are incompletely understood. We measured plasma markers of neuronal injury (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP], neurofilament light chain [NfL]) and inflammation among a cohort of people with prior confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection at early and late recovery following the initial illness (defined as < and > 90 days since COVID-19 onset, respectively). We hypothesized that those experiencing persistent neurologic symptoms would have elevations in these markers. Methods: The primary clinical outcome was the presence of self-reported central nervous system (CNS) PASC symptoms during the late recovery timepoint. We compared fold-changes in marker values between those with and without CNS PASC symptoms using linear mixed effects models and examined relationships between neurologic and immunologic markers using rank linear correlations. Results: Of 121 individuals, 52 reported CNS PASC symptoms. During early recovery, those who went on to report CNS PASC symptoms had elevations in GFAP (1.3-fold higher mean ratio, 95% CI 1.04-1.63, p=0.02), but not NfL (1.06-fold higher mean ratio, 95% CI 0.89-1.26, p=0.54). During late recovery, neither GFAP nor NfL levels were elevated among those with CNS PASC symptoms. Although absolute levels of NfL did not differ, those who reported CNS PASC symptoms demonstrated a stronger downward trend over time in comparison to those who did not report CNS PASC symptoms (p=0.041). Those who went on to report CNS PASC also exhibited elevations in IL-6 (48% higher during early recovery and 38% higher during late recovery), MCP-1 (19% higher during early recovery), and TNF-alpha (19% higher during early recovery and 13% higher during late recovery). GFAP and NfL correlated with levels of several immune markers during early recovery (MCP-1, IL-6, TNF-a, IFN-g);these correlations were attenuated during late recovery. Conclusion: Self-reported neurologic symptoms present approximately four months following SARS-CoV-2 infection are associated with elevations in markers of neurologic injury and inflammation at early recovery timepoints, suggesting that early injury can result in long-term disease. The correlation of GFAP and NfL with markers of systemic immune activation suggests one possible mechanism that might contribute to these symptoms. Additional work will be needed to better characterize these processes and to identify interventions to prevent or treat this condition.

3.
PubMed; 2022.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-338328

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mechanisms underlying persistent cardiopulmonary symptoms following SARS-CoV-2 infection (post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 "PASC" or "Long COVID") remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the pathophysiology of cardiopulmonary PASC using multimodality cardiovascular imaging including cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and ambulatory rhythm monitoring. METHODS: We performed CMR, CPET, and ambulatory rhythm monitoring among adults > 1 year after PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in the UCSF Long-Term Impact of Infection with Novel Coronavirus cohort (LIINC;NCT04362150 ) and correlated findings with previously measured biomarkers. We used logistic regression to estimate associations with PASC symptoms (dyspnea, chest pain, palpitations, and fatigue) adjusted for confounders and linear regression to estimate differences between those with and without symptoms adjusted for confounders. RESULTS: Out of 120 participants in the cohort, 46 participants (unselected for symptom status) had at least one advanced cardiac test performed at median 17 months following initial SARS-CoV-2 infection. Median age was 52 (IQR 42-61), 18 (39%) were female, and 6 (13%) were hospitalized for severe acute infection. On CMR (n=39), higher extracellular volume was associated with symptoms, but no evidence of late-gadolinium enhancement or differences in T1 or T2 mapping were demonstrated. We did not find arrhythmias on ambulatory monitoring. In contrast, on CPET (n=39), 13/23 (57%) with cardiopulmonary symptoms or fatigue had reduced exercise capacity (peak VO 2 <85% predicted) compared to 2/16 (13%) without symptoms (p=0.008). The adjusted difference in peak VO 2 was 5.9 ml/kg/min lower (-9.6 to -2.3;p=0.002) or -21% predicted (-35 to -7;p=0.006) among those with symptoms. Chronotropic incompetence was the primary abnormality among 9/15 (60%) with reduced peak VO 2 . Adjusted heart rate reserve <80% was associated with reduced exercise capacity (OR 15.6, 95%CI 1.30-187;p=0.03). Inflammatory markers (hsCRP, IL-6, TNF-alpha) and SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels measured early in PASC were negatively correlated with peak VO 2 more than 1 year later. CONCLUSIONS: Cardiopulmonary symptoms and elevated inflammatory markers present early in PASC are associated with objectively reduced exercise capacity measured on cardiopulmonary exercise testing more than 1 year following COVID-19. Chronotropic incompetence may explain reduced exercise capacity among some individuals with PASC. Clinical Perspective: What is New?Elevated inflammatory markers in early post-acute COVID-19 are associated with reduced exercise capacity more than 1 year later.Impaired chronotropic response to exercise is associated with reduced exercise capacity and cardiopulmonary symptoms more than 1 year after SARS-CoV-2 infection.Findings on ambulatory rhythm monitoring point to perturbed autonomic function, while cardiac MRI findings argue against myocardial dysfunction and myocarditis. Clinical Implications: Cardiopulmonary testing to identify etiologies of persistent symptoms in post-acute sequalae of COVID-19 or "Long COVID" should be performed in a manner that allows for assessment of heart rate response to exercise. Therapeutic trials of anti-inflammatory and exercise strategies in PASC are urgently needed and should include assessment of symptoms and objective testing with cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

4.
PubMed; 2022.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-331011

ABSTRACT

Background We conducted in-depth interviews to characterize reasons for COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in emergency department (ED) patients and developed messaging platforms that may address their concerns. In this trial we seek to determine whether provision of these COVID-19 vaccine messaging platforms in EDs will be associated with greater COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and uptake in unvaccinated ED patients. Methods This is a cluster-randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluating our COVID-19 vaccine messaging platforms in seven hospital EDs (mix of academic, community, and safety-net EDs) in four US cities. Within each study site, we randomized 30 one-week periods to the intervention and 30 one-week periods to the control. Adult patients who have not received a COVID-19 vaccine are eligible with these exclusions: 1) major trauma, intoxication, altered mental status, or critical illness;2) incarceration;3) psychiatric chief complaint;and 4) suspicion of acute COVID-19 illness. Participants receive an orally administered Intake survey. During intervention weeks participants then receive three COVID-19 vaccine messaging platforms (4-minute video, one-page informational flyer and a brief, scripted face-to-face message delivered by ED physicians and nurses);patients enrolled during non-intervention weeks do not receive these platforms. Approximately an hour after intake surveys, participants receive a Vaccine Acceptance survey during which the primary outcome of acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine in the ED is ascertained. The other primary outcome of receipt of a COVID-19 vaccine within 32 days is ascertained by electronic health record review and phone follow-up. To determine whether provision of vaccine messaging platforms is associated with a 7% increase in vaccine acceptance and uptake, we will need to enroll 1290 patients. Discussion Highlighting the difficulties of trial implementation during the COVID-19 pandemic in acute care settings, our novel trial will lay the groundwork for delivery of public health interventions to vulnerable populations whose only health care access occurs in EDs. Trial Status: We began enrollment in December 2021 and expect to continue through 2022. Conclusions Toward addressing vaccine hesitancy in vulnerable populations who seek care in EDs, our cluster-RCT will determine whether implementation of vaccine messaging platforms is associated with greater COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and uptake in unvaccinated ED patients.

5.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 8(SUPPL 1):S805, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1746280

ABSTRACT

Background. Limited data are available on whether there are differences in the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination by HIV status or by mRNA vaccine type. Methods. We saved residual outpatient laboratory samples of all previously mRNA-vaccinated individuals in the adult medicine clinics of a public hospital with a large outpatient HIV clinic during May 2021, and then excluded individuals with prior SARS-CoV-2 infection. We next 1:1 matched 100 PLWH to 100 outpatient HIVnegative adult medicine patients receiving care for chronic medical conditions on days since completion of second vaccination (minimum 10), sex, age +/-5 years, and the type of mRNA vaccine received. We defined a non-response as reciprocal pseudovirus neutralizing titer< 10 and anti-RBD IgG< 10 relative fluorescent units, and compared non-response by HIV status using mixed models. Results. In each matched group there were 13 women;25 received the mRNA-1273 vaccine and 75 received the BNT162b2 vaccine;the median age was 59. The median time from second vaccination was 35 days (IQR: 20-63). Among PLWH, the median CD4+ T-cell count was 511 (IQR: 351-796) and 5 individuals had HIV RNA > 200. We found 2.4-fold greater odds of pseudovirus neutralizing antibody non-response among PLWH compared to people without HIV (95% CI=1.1-5.4). Although few individuals in each group did not mount an IgG response (12 among PLWH vs. 5;p=0.08), continuous anti-RBD IgG concentrations were 43% lower among PLWH (95% CI=0.36-0.88). Among PLWH, when adjusting for age, sex, and days post-vaccination, each 100-cell increase in CD4+T-cell count was associated with 22% higher neutralizing antibody titers (GMR 1.22;95% CI=1.09-1.37). Unsuppressed HIV RNA >200 was associated with 89% lower neutralizing antibody titers (GMR 0.11;95% CI=0.01-0.84). Receipt of the BNT162b2 vs. mRNA-1273 vaccine was associated with 77% lower neutralizing titers (GMR 0.23;95% CI=0.08-0.65) among PLWH. Post-mRNA Vaccination SARS-CoV-2 IgG Concentrations and Pseudovirus Neutralizing Titers by HIV Status and Vaccine Conclusion. PLWH had lower than expected response to mRNA SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, with the highest non-response among those with low CD4+ counts, unsuppressed HIV RNA, and those who received the BNT162b2 vaccine. Immunization strategies to improve immune responses among PLWH should be studied, and may include booster vaccination or preference of the mRNA-1273 vaccine in this group.

7.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 29(1):242, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1250732

ABSTRACT

Background: Although data are mixed, most cohorts show a similar or lower COVID-19 incidence among people living with HIV (PLWH) compared to the general population. However, incidence may be impacted by lower testing rates among vulnerable populations. We compared SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence and IgG levels, and disease severity, among patients with and without HIV receiving care within a county hospital system over a three-month period. Methods: From August through October 2020, remnant serum samples were collected from all PLWH who underwent routine outpatient laboratory testing at San Francisco General Hospital which houses a large HIV clinic (Ward 86). Patients with HIV were matched on time of collection (same day) and age (+/- 5 years) to 1-2 adults without HIV. SARS-CoV-2 levels of IgG levels was quantified in serum using the Pylon IgG assay (100% specificity on internal validation). Seroprevalence was compared by HIV status via conditional logit models, adjusting for sex. For those with reactive results, IgG levels were compared by HIV status using log-transformed generalized estimating equations. Severe disease, assessed via chart review, was defined as requiring oxygen. Results: Among 1,411 individuals (46% PLWH), the median age was 58 (IQR: 49-65), 64% were men. COVID-19 seroprevalence was 3.1% among PLWH compared to 6.8% among people without HIV (adjusted odds ratio 0.41;95% confidence interval (CI): 0.25-0.68, p<0.001). Among those with reactive COVID-19 IgG results (n=72, 20 in PLWH);antibody levels were 47% lower among PLWH (95% CI: 19-65% lower;p=0.003;Figure);however, there was a trend towards higher disease severity among PLWH [15% (n=3) vs. 4% (n=2);p=0.13]. Conclusion: Both seroprevalence, and absolute SARS-CoV-2 IgG levels in those with reactive results, were lower among PLWH, within a time and agematched population of outpatients receiving routine laboratory testing in an urban hospital. PLWH may have had higher adherence to non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) than those without HIV, leading to lower COVID-19 seroprevalence and, possibly, lower COVID-19 IgG levels if infected with a lower viral inoculum due to NPIs. Alternatively, PLWH may mount lower antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2, as has been demonstrated with hepatitis B and yellow fever vaccines. Further studies of COVID-19 susceptibility and immunity are needed among PLWH. Moreover, PLWH should be enrolled in SARS-CoV-2 vaccine studies or followed after vaccination to ensure they mount sufficient humoral responses.

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