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1.
Front Psychiatry ; 13: 838694, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952714

ABSTRACT

Social distancing, home confinement, economic challenges, and COVID-19-related illness and deaths during the COVID-19 pandemic can significantly affect mental health in youth. One promising approach to reduce anxiety and depression in adolescents is the neuroscience-based mindfulness intervention Training for Awareness, Resilience, and Action (TARA). The objective of this individually randomized waitlist-controlled trial (RCT) was (1) to test the feasibility of TARA, delivered partially over Zoom, and (2) to assess changes in the emotional wellbeing in healthy adolescents between the ages of 14-18 years old during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Twenty-one healthy adolescents were randomized to the TARA intervention or to the waitlist control group in February 2020, just before the start of the pandemic. The TARA group intervention was delivered in person for the first five sessions and remotely over Zoom for the remaining seven sessions due to the pandemic. The participants' acceptability of TARA was assessed weekly using the Child Session Rating Scale (CSRS). The primary outcome was the emotional wellbeing measured using emotional symptoms subscale of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) pre/post-TARA. We also explored weekly changes in TARA participants' wellbeing using the Child Outcome Rating Scale (CORS). RESULTS: The overall session rating in TARA participants improved after the switch to Zoom (Cohen's d = 1.2, p = 0.008). The results of the two-way ANOVA showed no statistically significant difference in the change of the SDQ emotional symptoms during the 12 weeks between the TARA group and waitlist-control group (timepoint × group interaction: F = 0.77, p = 0.38). The exploratory analysis using the CORS in the TARA participants showed a significant improvement in their functioning over the weeks of training. CONCLUSION: Our results support the feasibility of TARA delivered over Zoom. While our primary outcome did not provide support for the improvement of the emotional wellbeing with TARA compared to a passive control group, our exploratory analysis in the intervention group indicated an improved functioning over the weeks of TARA training. The important general positive impact of this study lies in the possibility of offering a neuroscience-based mindfulness intervention remotely to youth living in remote areas and for all youth during pandemic times.

2.
Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm ; 9(5)2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1892254

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The biologic mechanisms underlying neurologic postacute sequelae of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection (PASC) are incompletely understood. METHODS: We measured markers of neurologic injury (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP], neurofilament light chain [NfL]) and soluble markers of inflammation among a cohort of people with prior confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection at early and late recovery after the initial illness (defined as less than and greater than 90 days, respectively). The primary clinical outcome was the presence of self-reported CNS PASC symptoms during the late recovery time point. We compared fold changes in marker values between those with and without CNS PASC symptoms using linear mixed-effects models and examined relationships between neurologic and immunologic markers using rank linear correlations. RESULTS: Of 121 individuals, 52 reported CNS PASC symptoms. During early recovery, those who went on to report CNS PASC symptoms had elevations in GFAP (1.3-fold higher mean ratio, 95% CI 1.04-1.63, p = 0.02), but not NfL (1.06-fold higher mean ratio, 95% CI 0.89-1.26, p = 0.54). During late recovery, neither GFAP nor NfL levels were elevated among those with CNS PASC symptoms. Although absolute levels of NfL did not differ, those who reported CNS PASC symptoms demonstrated a stronger downward trend over time in comparison with those who did not report CNS PASC symptoms (p = 0.041). Those who went on to report CNS PASC also exhibited elevations in interleukin 6 (48% higher during early recovery and 38% higher during late recovery), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (19% higher during early recovery), and tumor necrosis factor α (19% higher during early recovery and 13% higher during late recovery). GFAP and NfL correlated with levels of several immune activation markers during early recovery; these correlations were attenuated during late recovery. DISCUSSION: Self-reported neurologic symptoms present approximately 4 months after SARS-CoV-2 infection are associated with elevations in markers of neurologic injury and inflammation at earlier time points. Some inflammatory pathways seem to be involved months after acute infection. Additional work will be needed to better characterize these processes and to identify interventions to prevent or treat this condition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Biomarkers , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Inflammation , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report
3.
Frontiers in psychiatry ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1871884

ABSTRACT

Social distancing, home confinement, economic challenges, and COVID-19-related illness and deaths during the COVID-19 pandemic can significantly affect mental health in youth. One promising approach to reduce anxiety and depression in adolescents is the neuroscience-based mindfulness intervention Training for Awareness, Resilience, and Action (TARA). The objective of this individually randomized waitlist-controlled trial (RCT) was (1) to test the feasibility of TARA, delivered partially over Zoom, and (2) to assess changes in the emotional wellbeing in healthy adolescents between the ages of 14–18 years old during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: Twenty-one healthy adolescents were randomized to the TARA intervention or to the waitlist control group in February 2020, just before the start of the pandemic. The TARA group intervention was delivered in person for the first five sessions and remotely over Zoom for the remaining seven sessions due to the pandemic. The participants’ acceptability of TARA was assessed weekly using the Child Session Rating Scale (CSRS). The primary outcome was the emotional wellbeing measured using emotional symptoms subscale of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) pre/post-TARA. We also explored weekly changes in TARA participants’ wellbeing using the Child Outcome Rating Scale (CORS). Results: The overall session rating in TARA participants improved after the switch to Zoom (Cohen’s d = 1.2, p = 0.008). The results of the two-way ANOVA showed no statistically significant difference in the change of the SDQ emotional symptoms during the 12 weeks between the TARA group and waitlist-control group (timepoint × group interaction: F = 0.77, p = 0.38). The exploratory analysis using the CORS in the TARA participants showed a significant improvement in their functioning over the weeks of training. Conclusion: Our results support the feasibility of TARA delivered over Zoom. While our primary outcome did not provide support for the improvement of the emotional wellbeing with TARA compared to a passive control group, our exploratory analysis in the intervention group indicated an improved functioning over the weeks of TARA training. The important general positive impact of this study lies in the possibility of offering a neuroscience-based mindfulness intervention remotely to youth living in remote areas and for all youth during pandemic times.

4.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2022 Mar 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1852995

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: After COVID-19 shelter-in-place (SIP) orders, viral suppression (VS) rates initially decreased within a safety-net HIV clinic in San Francisco, particularly among people living with HIV (PLWH) experiencing homelessness. We sought to understand if (1) proactive outreach to provide social services, (2) scaling up of in-person visits, and (3) expansion of housing programs could reverse this decline. METHODS: We assessed VS 24 months before and 13 months after SIP using mixed-effects logistic regression, followed by interrupted time series (ITS) analysis to examine changes in the rate of viral suppression per month. Loss to follow-up (LTFU) was assessed via active clinic tracing. RESULTS: Data from 1,816 patients were included, with a median age of 51 years, 12% were female, 14% experiencing unstable housing/homelessness. The adjusted odds of VS increased 1.34-fold following institution of the multi-component strategies (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.21-1.46). In the ITS analysis, the odds of VS continuously increased 1.05-fold per month over the post-intervention period (95% CI=1.01-1.08). Among PLWH previously experiencing homelessness who successfully received housing support, the odds of VS were 1.94-fold higher (95% CI=1.05-3.59). The one-year loss to follow-up rate was 2.8 per 100-person-years (95% CI=2.2-3.5). CONCLUSIONS: After an initial destabilization in VS following SIP orders, the VS rate increased following institution of the multi-component strategies, with a lower LFTU rate compared to prior years. Maintaining in-person care for underserved patients, with flexible telemedicine options, along with provision of social services and permanent expansion of housing programs, will be needed to support VS among underserved populations during the COVID-19 pandemic.

6.
Open forum infectious diseases ; 8(Suppl 1):S805-S805, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1564850

ABSTRACT

Background Limited data are available on whether there are differences in the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination by HIV status or by mRNA vaccine type. Methods We saved residual outpatient laboratory samples of all previously mRNA-vaccinated individuals in the adult medicine clinics of a public hospital with a large outpatient HIV clinic during May 2021, and then excluded individuals with prior SARS-CoV-2 infection. We next 1:1 matched 100 PLWH to 100 outpatient HIV-negative adult medicine patients receiving care for chronic medical conditions on days since completion of second vaccination (minimum 10), sex, age +/-5 years, and the type of mRNA vaccine received. We defined a non-response as reciprocal pseudovirus neutralizing titer< 10 and anti-RBD IgG< 10 relative fluorescent units, and compared non-response by HIV status using mixed models. Results In each matched group there were 13 women;25 received the mRNA-1273 vaccine and 75 received the BNT162b2 vaccine;the median age was 59. The median time from second vaccination was 35 days (IQR: 20–63). Among PLWH, the median CD4+ T-cell count was 511 (IQR: 351–796) and 5 individuals had HIV RNA > 200. We found 2.4-fold greater odds of pseudovirus neutralizing antibody non-response among PLWH compared to people without HIV (95% CI=1.1–5.4). Although few individuals in each group did not mount an IgG response (12 among PLWH vs. 5;p=0.08), continuous anti-RBD IgG concentrations were 43% lower among PLWH (95% CI=0.36–0.88). Among PLWH, when adjusting for age, sex, and days post-vaccination, each 100-cell increase in CD4+T-cell count was associated with 22% higher neutralizing antibody titers (GMR 1.22;95% CI=1.09–1.37). Unsuppressed HIV RNA >200 was associated with 89% lower neutralizing antibody titers (GMR 0.11;95% CI=0.01–0.84). Receipt of the BNT162b2 vs. mRNA-1273 vaccine was associated with 77% lower neutralizing titers (GMR 0.23;95% CI=0.08–0.65) among PLWH. Post-mRNA Vaccination SARS-CoV-2 IgG Concentrations and Pseudovirus Neutralizing Titers by HIV Status and Vaccine Conclusion PLWH had lower than expected response to mRNA SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, with the highest non-response among those with low CD4+ counts, unsuppressed HIV RNA, and those who received the BNT162b2 vaccine. Immunization strategies to improve immune responses among PLWH should be studied, and may include booster vaccination or preference of the mRNA-1273 vaccine in this group. Disclosures Matthew A. Spinelli, MD, MAS, Nothing to disclose Monica Gandhi, MD, MPH, Nothing to disclose

7.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2021 Dec 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550542

ABSTRACT

Following SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccination, people living with HIV (PLWH) had lower surrogate virus neutralization test response (p=0.03) and a trend towards lower IgG response (p=0.08), particularly among those with lower CD4+T-cell counts and who received the BNT162b2 vaccine. Study of the impact of supplemental vaccine doses among PLWH is needed.

9.
AIDS ; 35(15): 2545-2547, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532623

ABSTRACT

To assess SARS-CoV-2 outcomes, we matched a municipal COVID-19 registry and clinic rosters from a municipal primary care network containing a large HIV clinic and assessed clinical outcomes by HIV status. The risk of severe COVID-19 was higher among people with HIV (PWH, adjusted relative risk = 1.84, 95% confidence interval = 1.05-3.25), while SARS-CoV-2 incidence was lower despite higher testing rates. SARS-CoV-2 vaccination campaigns should prioritize PWH to prevent severe COVID-19 disease given potentially higher risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , COVID-19 Vaccines , HIV Infections/complications , Humans , Incidence , SARS-CoV-2
10.
J Infect Dis ; 224(11): 1839-1848, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483458

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The biological processes associated with postacute sequelae of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection (PASC) are unknown. METHODS: We measured soluble markers of inflammation in a SARS-CoV-2 recovery cohort at early (<90 days) and late (>90 days) timepoints. We defined PASC as the presence of 1 or more coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-attributed symptoms beyond 90 days. We compared fold-changes in marker values between those with and without PASC using mixed-effects models with terms for PASC and early and late recovery time periods. RESULTS: During early recovery, those who went on to develop PASC generally had higher levels of cytokine biomarkers including tumor necrosis factor-α (1.14-fold higher mean ratio [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.01-1.28]; P = .028) and interferon-γ-induced protein 10 (1.28-fold higher mean ratio [95% CI, 1.01-1.62]; P = .038). Among those with PASC, there was a trend toward higher interleukin 6 levels during early recovery (1.29-fold higher mean ratio [95% CI, .98-1.70]; P = .07), which became more pronounced in late recovery (1.44-fold higher mean ratio [95% CI, 1.11-1.86]; P < .001). These differences were more pronounced among those with a greater number of PASC symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Persistent immune activation may be associated with ongoing symptoms following COVID-19. Further characterization of these processes might identify therapeutic targets for those experiencing PASC.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Inflammation , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Disease Progression , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/virology
11.
Ann Intern Med ; 174(8): 1151-1158, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1481184

ABSTRACT

The development of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines began in March 2020 in response to a request from the White House Coronavirus Task Force. Within 4 days of the request, the NIH COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines Panel was established and the first meeting took place (virtually-as did subsequent meetings). The Panel comprises 57 individuals representing 6 governmental agencies, 11 professional societies, and 33 medical centers, plus 2 community members, who have worked together to create and frequently update the guidelines on the basis of evidence from the most recent clinical studies available. The initial version of the guidelines was completed within 2 weeks and posted online on 21 April 2020. Initially, sparse evidence was available to guide COVID-19 treatment recommendations. However, treatment data rapidly accrued based on results from clinical studies that used various study designs and evaluated different therapeutic agents and approaches. Data have continued to evolve at a rapid pace, leading to 24 revisions and updates of the guidelines in the first year. This process has provided important lessons for responding to an unprecedented public health emergency: Providers and stakeholders are eager to access credible, current treatment guidelines; governmental agencies, professional societies, and health care leaders can work together effectively and expeditiously; panelists from various disciplines, including biostatistics, are important for quickly developing well-informed recommendations; well-powered randomized clinical trials continue to provide the most compelling evidence to guide treatment recommendations; treatment recommendations need to be developed in a confidential setting free from external pressures; development of a user-friendly, web-based format for communicating with health care providers requires substantial administrative support; and frequent updates are necessary as clinical evidence rapidly emerges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Advisory Committees , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Data Interpretation, Statistical , Drug Approval , Evidence-Based Medicine , Female , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , National Institutes of Health (U.S.) , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Stakeholder Participation , United States
12.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 21(9): e296-e301, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371553

ABSTRACT

Adherence to non-pharmaceutical interventions to prevent the transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been highly variable across settings, particularly in the USA. In this Personal View, we review data supporting the importance of the viral inoculum (the dose of viral particles from an infected source over time) in increasing the probability of infection in respiratory, gastrointestinal, and sexually transmitted viral infections in humans. We also review the available evidence linking the relationship of the viral inoculum to disease severity. Non-pharmaceutical interventions might reduce the susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection by reducing the viral inoculum when there is exposure to an infectious source. Data from physical sciences research suggest that masks protect the wearer by filtering virus from external sources, and others by reducing expulsion of virus by the wearer. Social distancing, handwashing, and improved ventilation also reduce the exposure amount of viral particles from an infectious source. Maintaining and increasing non-pharmaceutical interventions can help to quell SARS-CoV-2 as we enter the second year of the pandemic. Finally, we argue that even as safe and effective vaccines are being rolled out, non-pharmaceutical interventions will continue to play an essential role in suppressing SARS-CoV-2 transmission until equitable and widespread vaccine administration has been completed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Hand Disinfection , Humans , Masks/virology , Physical Distancing , Severity of Illness Index , Ventilation , Virus Diseases/transmission
13.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 8(8): ofab385, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1361798

ABSTRACT

We characterized the antibody composition of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) convalescent plasma (CCP) and the immunologic responses of hospitalized COVID-19 patients after receiving CCP or nonimmune fresh frozen plasma. Despite selection of CCP with significantly higher total immunoglobulin G than recipients, neutralizing antibody levels did not differ between donor plasma and CCP recipients.

14.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(7): e2116113, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300326

ABSTRACT

Importance: Policies to promote social distancing can minimize COVID-19 transmission but come with substantial social and economic costs. Quantifying relative preferences among the public for such practices can inform locally relevant policy prioritization and optimize uptake. Objective: To evaluate relative utilities (ie, preferences) for COVID-19 pandemic social distancing strategies against the hypothetical risk of acquiring COVID-19 and anticipated income loss. Design, Setting, and Participants: This survey study recruited individuals living in the Missouri area from May to June 2020 via randomly distributed unincentivized social media advertisements and local recruitment platforms for members of minority racial and ethnic groups. Participants answered 6 questions that asked them to choose between 2 hypothetical counties where business closures, social distancing policy duration, COVID-19 infection risk, and income loss varied. Main Outcomes and Measures: Reweighted population-level relative preferences (utilities) for social distancing policies, subgroups, and latent classes. Results: The survey had a 3% response rate (3045 of 90 320). Of the 2428 respondents who completed the survey, 1669 (75%) were 35 years and older, 1536 (69%) were women, and 1973 (89%) were White. After reweighting to match Missouri population demographic characteristics, the strongest preference was for the prohibition of large gatherings (mean preference, -1.43; 95% CI, -1.67 to -1.18), with relative indifference to the closure of social and lifestyle venues (mean preference, 0.05; 95% CI, -0.08 to 0.17). There were weak preferences to keep outdoor venues (mean preference, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.61) and schools (mean preference, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.30) open. Latent class analysis revealed 4 distinct preference phenotypes in the population: risk averse (48.9%), conflicted (22.5%), prosocial (14.9%), and back to normal (13.7%), with men twice as likely as women to belong to the back to normal group than the risk averse group (relative risk ratio, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.54 to 3.12). Conclusions And relevance: In this survey study using a discrete choice experiment, public health policies that prohibited large gatherings, as well as those that closed social and lifestyle venues, appeared to be acceptable to the public. During policy implementation, these activities should be prioritized for first-phase closures. These findings suggest that policy messages that address preference heterogeneity (eg, focusing on specific preference subgroups or targeting men) could improve adherence to social distancing measures for COVID-19 and future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Behavior , Physical Distancing , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Missouri/epidemiology , Public Opinion , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
15.
Lancet HIV ; 8(6): e334-e341, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1210023

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Most cohorts show similar or lower COVID-19 incidence among people living with HIV compared with the general population. However, incidence might be affected by lower testing rates among vulnerable populations. We aimed to compare SARS-CoV-2 IgG seroprevalence, disease severity, and neutralising antibody activity after infection among people with and without HIV receiving care in a county hospital system over a 3-month period. METHODS: In this matched case-control observational study, remnant serum samples were collected between Aug 1 and Oct 31, 2020, from all people living with HIV who underwent routine outpatient laboratory testing in a municipal health-care system (San Francisco General Hospital, CA, USA). Samples from people living with HIV were date of collection-matched (same day) and age-matched (±5 years) to samples from randomly selected adults (aged 18 years or older) without HIV receiving care for chronic conditions at the same hospital. We compared seroprevalence by HIV status via mixed-effects logistic regression models, accounting for the matched structure of the data (random effects for the matched group), adjusting for age, sex, race or ethnicity, and clinical factors (ie, history of cardiovascular or pulmonary disease, and type 2 diabetes). Severe COVID-19 was assessed in participants with past SARS-CoV-2 (IgG or PCR) infection by chart review and compared with multivariable mixed-effects logistic regression, adjusting for age and sex. SARS-CoV-2 IgG, neutralising antibody titres, and antibody avidity were measured in serum of participants with previous positive PCR tests and compared with multivariable mixed-effects models, adjusting for age, sex, and time since PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. FINDINGS: 1138 samples from 955 people living with HIV and 1118 samples from 1062 people without HIV were tested. SARS-CoV-2 IgG seroprevalence was 3·7% (95% CI 2·4 to 5·0) among people with HIV compared with 7·4% (5·7 to 9·2) among people without HIV (adjusted odds ratio 0·50, 95% CI 0·30 to 0·83). Among 31 people with HIV and 70 people without HIV who had evidence of past infection, the odds of severe COVID-19 were 5·52 (95% CI 1·01 to 64·48) times higher among people living with HIV. Adjusting for time since PCR-confirmed infection, SARS-CoV-2 IgG concentrations were lower (percentage change -53%, 95% CI -4 to -76), pseudovirus neutralising antibody titres were lower (-67%, -25 to -86), and avidity was similar (7%, -73 to 87) among people living with HIV compared with those without HIV. INTERPRETATION: Although fewer infections were detected by SARS-CoV-2 IgG testing among people living with HIV than among those without HIV, people with HIV had more cases of severe COVID-19. Among people living with HIV with past SARS-CoV-2 infection, lower IgG concentrations and pseudovirus neutralising antibody titres might reflect a diminished serological response to infection, and the similar avidity could be driven by similar time since infection. FUNDING: US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, US National Institutes of Health.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , HIV Infections/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Female , HIV Infections/blood , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/virology , HIV-1/immunology , HIV-1/pathogenicity , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neutralization Tests , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , San Francisco/epidemiology , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Severity of Illness Index
16.
AIDS ; 34(15): 2328-2331, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087867

ABSTRACT

: The COVID-19 pandemic is expected to hinder US End the HIV Epidemic goals. We evaluated viral suppression and retention-in-care before and after telemedicine was instituted, in response to shelter-in-place mandates, in a large, urban HIV clinic. The odds of viral nonsuppression were 31% higher postshelter-in-place (95% confidence interval = 1.08-1.53) in spite of stable retention-in-care and visit volume, with disproportionate impact on homeless individuals. Measures to counteract the effect of COVID-19 on HIV outcomes are urgently needed.


Subject(s)
Anti-HIV Agents/therapeutic use , Communicable Disease Control , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Public Policy , Sustained Virologic Response , Telemedicine , Adult , African Americans , Age Factors , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Female , HIV Infections/blood , Health Services Accessibility , Homeless Persons/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , No-Show Patients/statistics & numerical data , Odds Ratio , Retention in Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety-net Providers , San Francisco , Viral Load
17.
AIDS ; 35(3): 517-519, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052232

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) threatens to further worsen HIV outcomes among people experiencing homelessness. We conducted an interrupted time-series analysis of care engagement and viral suppression among unhoused individuals in the 'POP-UP' low-barrier, high-intensity HIV primary care program during COVID-19. Among 85 patients, care engagement and viral suppression did not decrease in the 5 months following implementation of San Francisco's 'shelter-in-place' ordinance. Low-barrier, in-person HIV care for homeless individuals may be important for maintaining HIV outcomes during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections/therapy , Homeless Persons , Pandemics , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Primary Health Care , San Francisco
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