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1.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-320536

ABSTRACT

Purpose: SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are a key step in fighting the pandemic. Nevertheless, their rapid development did not allow for testing among specific population subgroups such as pregnant and breastfeeding women, or elaborating specific guidelines for healthcare personnel working in high infection risk specialties, such as otolaryngology (ORL). This clinical consensus statement (CCS) aims to offer guidance for SARS-CoV-2 vaccination to this high-risk population based on the best evidence available. Methods: : A multidisciplinary international panel of 33 specialists judged statements through a 2-rounds modified Delphi method survey. Statements were designed to encompass the following topics: risk of SARS-Cov-2 infection and use of protective equipment in ORL;SARS-Cov-2 infection and vaccines and respective risks for the mother/child dyad;and counseling for SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in pregnant, breastfeeding, or fertile healthcare workers (PBFHW). All ORL PBFHW were considered as the target audience. Results: : Of the 13 statements, 7 reached consensus or strong consensus, 2 reached noConsensus and 2 reached near-consensus. According to the statements with strong consensus Otorhinolaryngologists – Head & Neck Surgeons who are pregnant, breastfeeding or with childbearing potential should have the opportunity to receive SARS-Cov-2 vaccination. Moreover, personal protective equipment (PPE) should still be used even after the vaccination. Conclusion: Until prospective evaluations on these topics are available, ORL-HNS must be considered a high infection risk specialty. While the use of PPE remains pivotal, ORL PBFHW should be allowed access to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination provided they receive up-to-date information.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-316649

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The rapid spread of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic around the world caused most healthcare services to turn substantial attention to treatment of these patients and also to alter the structure of healthcare systems to address an infectious disease. As a result, many cancer patients had their treatment deferred during the pandemic, increasing the time to treatment initiation, the number of untreated patients (which will alter the dynamics of healthcare delivery in the post-pandemic era) and increasing their risk of death. Hence, we analyzed the impact on global cancer mortality considering the decline in oncology care during the COVID-19 outbreak using head and neck cancer, a known time-dependent disease, as a model. Methods: : An online practical tool capable of predicting the risk of cancer patients dying due to the COVID-19 outbreak and also useful for mitigation strategies after the peak of the pandemic has been developed, based on a mathematical model. The scenarios were estimated by information of 15 oncological services worldwide, given a perspective from the five continents and also some simulations were conducted at world demographic data. Results: : The model demonstrates that the more that cancer care was maintained during the outbreak and also the more it is increased during the mitigation period, the shorter will be the recovery, lessening the additional risk of dying due to time to treatment initiation. Conclusions: : This impact of COVID-19 pandemic on cancer patients is inevitable, but it is possible to minimize it with an effort measured by the proposed model.

3.
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol ; 278(10): 4091-4099, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1184666

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are a key step in fighting the pandemic. Nevertheless, their rapid development did not allow for testing among specific population subgroups such as pregnant and breastfeeding women, or elaborating specific guidelines for healthcare personnel working in high infection risk specialties, such as otolaryngology (ORL). This clinical consensus statement (CCS) aims to offer guidance for SARS-CoV-2 vaccination to this high-risk population based on the best evidence available. METHODS: A multidisciplinary international panel of 33 specialists judged statements through a two-round modified Delphi method survey. Statements were designed to encompass the following topics: risk of SARS-Cov-2 infection and use of protective equipment in ORL; SARS-Cov-2 infection and vaccines and respective risks for the mother/child dyad; and counseling for SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in pregnant, breastfeeding, or fertile healthcare workers (PBFHW). All ORL PBFHW were considered as the target audience. RESULTS: Of the 13 statements, 7 reached consensus or strong consensus, 2 reached no consensus, and 2 reached near-consensus. According to the statements with strong consensus otorhinolaryngologists-head and neck surgeons who are pregnant, breastfeeding, or with childbearing potential should have the opportunity to receive SARS-Cov-2 vaccination. Moreover, personal protective equipment (PPE) should still be used even after the vaccination. CONCLUSION: Until prospective evaluations on these topics are available, ORL-HNS must be considered a high infection risk specialty. While the use of PPE remains pivotal, ORL PBFHW should be allowed access to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination provided they receive up-to-date information.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Otolaryngologists , Surgeons , Breast Feeding , Consensus , Female , Humans , Male , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
5.
Cancer Causes Control ; 32(5): 459-471, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1126565

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The rapid spread of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic around the world caused most healthcare services to turn substantial attention to treatment of these patients and also to alter the structure of healthcare systems to address an infectious disease. As a result, many cancer patients had their treatment deferred during the pandemic, increasing the time-to-treatment initiation, the number of untreated patients (which will alter the dynamics of healthcare delivery in the post-pandemic era) and increasing their risk of death. Hence, we analyzed the impact on global cancer mortality considering the decline in oncology care during the COVID-19 outbreak using head and neck cancer, a known time-dependent disease, as a model. METHODS: An online practical tool capable of predicting the risk of cancer patients dying due to the COVID-19 outbreak and also useful for mitigation strategies after the peak of the pandemic has been developed, based on a mathematical model. The scenarios were estimated by information of 15 oncological services worldwide, given a perspective from the five continents and also some simulations were conducted at world demographic data. RESULTS: The model demonstrates that the more that cancer care was maintained during the outbreak and also the more it is increased during the mitigation period, the shorter will be the recovery, lessening the additional risk of dying due to time-to-treatment initiation. CONCLUSIONS: This impact of COVID-19 pandemic on cancer patients is inevitable, but it is possible to minimize it with an effort measured by the proposed model.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Time-to-Treatment , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/etiology , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/mortality , Global Health , Head and Neck Neoplasms/etiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/mortality , Humans , Models, Theoretical , Risk Factors
6.
Lancet Oncol ; 21(7): e350-e359, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-593280

ABSTRACT

The speed and scale of the global COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in unprecedented pressures on health services worldwide, requiring new methods of service delivery during the health crisis. In the setting of severe resource constraint and high risk of infection to patients and clinicians, there is an urgent need to identify consensus statements on head and neck surgical oncology practice. We completed a modified Delphi consensus process of three rounds with 40 international experts in head and neck cancer surgical, radiation, and medical oncology, representing 35 international professional societies and national clinical trial groups. Endorsed by 39 societies and professional bodies, these consensus practice recommendations aim to decrease inconsistency of practice, reduce uncertainty in care, and provide reassurance for clinicians worldwide for head and neck surgical oncology in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic and in the setting of acute severe resource constraint and high risk of infection to patients and staff.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/surgery , Health Care Rationing , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Surgical Oncology/standards , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/pathology , Humans , International Cooperation , Occupational Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Oncology/organization & administration
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