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1.
Medicine ; 101(33):e29954, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001500

ABSTRACT

This observational, cross-sectional case-control study evaluates the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in elderly persons who have undergone surgery for adult spinal deformity (ASD). On December 31, 2019, the Chinese authorities first reported severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, and on March 11, 2020, it was declared a pandemic. The pandemic seems to have had a negative effect on elderly patients who underwent ASD, in terms of functional and psychological quality of life. We selected patients with ASD aged > 70 years who had undergone surgery between 2010 and 2015 and compared them with age- and sex-matched patients who did not have ASD. We recorded sociodemographic variables, type of surgery, levels of spinal fusion, HRQoL (Scoliosis Research Society-22, Short Form 12 Health Survey, EuroQol-5D [EQ-5], Geriatric Depression Scale [Yesavage] [GDS], Modified Frailty Index-11, and Barthel index), fear of visiting a health center, fear of leaving one's house, and adherence to preventive measures. The study population comprised 174 patients (mean [standard deviation] age, 77.3 [5.9] years;86% women), of whom 87 had undergone surgery for ASD. The incidence of COVID-19 was higher in patients aged > 85 years (P = .041), urban areas (P = .047), and in patients in long-term care (P = .03). Similarly, no differences were observed for the ability to cope with the pandemic (P > .05). Patients who underwent surgery also had a higher risk of depression (GDS, 6.7 [P = .02]), a lower EQ-5 score (P = .001), a higher body mass index (P = .004), greater consumption of drugs (P < .001), especially opiates (P < .001). Patients who underwent surgery constitute a vulnerable population during the COVID-19 pandemic, with poorer quality of life and had a much higher risk of depression. They are also polymedicated and prefrail, adhere well to COVID-19 preventive measures, and do not seem to fear visiting health centers.

2.
European heart journal. Cardiovascular Imaging ; 23(Suppl 1), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1999134

ABSTRACT

Funding Acknowledgements Type of funding sources: None. Introduction Myocardial damage has been widely described in patients with COVID-19. Right ventriculoarterial coupling (RVAC) is a marker of subclinical myocardial damage. The association with mortality in COVID-19 patients has been recently investigated. Objectives To determine if there is a difference in patients with abnormal vs normal RVAC, in clinical, laboratory and echocardiographic variables. Analyze if there is an association between the presence of abnormal RVAC and one-year mortality. Investigate the cutoff value of the RVAC to predict mortality. Methods. A single-center, prospective, analytical study. Patients with a diagnosis of COVID-19 were included. Patients who were on mechanical ventilation during the study, a history of ischemic heart disease, valvular heart disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were excluded. The patients were included during the period from May to August 2020, the 1-year follow-up was carried out through the electronic medical record and telephone calls. The echocardiograms were performed with the Phillips IE-33, the strain determination was obtained with the Qlab 13.0 software. The quantitative variables were compared with the Student"s T test or the U Mann-Whitney test, according to the normality of the variables;qualitative variables were contrasted with the x2 test. One-year survival was determined with the Kaplan-Meier curves, and the association with one-year mortality was investigated with Cox regression. The cut-off value for predicting mortality was determined with ROC curves. The RVAC was determined with the right ventricular free wall longitudinal strain / pulmonary systolic artery pressure ratio.  Abnormal right ventriculoarterial coupling was determined with a value less than 0.8. Results 81 patients were included, of whom 45 had an abnormal RVAC. Patients with abnormal RVAC had higher mortality and a higher requirement for mechanical ventilation;they had higher levels of biomarkers. Among the echocardiographic variables, they had lower the right ventricular fractional area change, the tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, the left ventricular longitudinal strain, the left atrial reservoir strain, the right ventricular free wall longitudinal strain, the RVAC;while they also presented higher the pulmonary systolic artery pressure and the tricuspid regurgitation velocity. The one-year survival of patients with abnormal RVAC was 53% vs 91%, the association with 1-year mortality was HR: 7.0 (CI95 2.1-23;p = 0.0001). The cutoff value of the RVAC to predict mortality was <0.48 (Sensitivity 71%, Specificity 90%, AUC: 0.836;p = <0.0001). Conclusion The patients with COVID-19 and an abnormal RVAC had a higher requirement for mechanical ventilation and mortality;presented higher levels of biomarkers. Half of the patients with abnormal RVAC died, presenting an association to predict mortality. The cut-off value of <0.48 was the best associated with mortality. Table 1   Figure 1

3.
Revista Cubana de Medicina ; 61(1), 2022.
Article in Spanish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1970454

ABSTRACT

Objective: To report a clinical case of spontaneous pneumomediastinum in a patient with COVID-2019, a disease with a rare complication. Clinical case report: We report the case of an 86-year-old patient with a clinical condicion of fever of 38o C and respiratory symptoms (cough with whitish secretions, dyspnea on moderate exertion). He underwent a polymerase chain reaction test for coronavirus disease 2019, which resulted positive. On the fourth day of his hospitalization, he his clinical condition worsened, including cough and progressive dyspnea accompanied by oxygen saturation less than 91%. The presence of pneumomediastinum was revealed by high-resolution imaging studies (computed tomography angiography of the chest). Discussion: The 2019 coronavirus disease pandemic has given rise to a global public health emergency, which requires health personnel to be familiar with symptoms, imaging results, and complications of this disease, such as pneumomediastinum found in this case. Conclution: Spontaneous pneumomediastinum is a rare complication that occurs in the inflammatory phase of this disease.

4.
Licata, M.; Giuffra, V.; Minozzi, S.; Lencioni, R.; Naccarato, A. G.; Castagna, M.; Chericoni, S.; Fornaciari, G.; Catalano, P.; Campana, S.; Felici, C.; Riccomi, G.; Fornaciari, A.; Gaeta, R.; Chericoni, S.; Stefanelli, F.; Naccarato, A. G.; Castagna, M.; Lencioni, R.; Giuffra, V.; Fornaciari, G.; Ferrari, L.; Formisano, E.; Mondello, A.; Maresi, E.; Florena, A. M.; Rossetti, C.; Boano, R.; Vellone, V. G.; Larentis, O.; Birkhoff, J. M.; Fulcheri, E.; Ferrari, L.; Bramanti, B.; The Medplug, Team, Olivieri, A.; Pallotti, F.; Capodiferro, M. R.; Colombo, G.; Licata, M.; Tesi, C.; Semino, O.; Achilli, A.; Torroni, A.; Minozzi, S.; Pantano, W.; Caldarini, C.; Catalano, P.; Giuffra, V.; Castiglioni, A.; Massa, S.; Lampugnani, P.; Mandelli, C.; Medin, T.; Licata, M.; Gorini, I.; Larentis, O.; Larentis, O.; Massa, S.; Lampugnani, P.; Mandelli, C.; Medin, T.; Licata, M.; Gorini, I.; Mattia, M.; Biehler-Gomez, L.; Poppa, P.; Candia, D. Di, Giordano, G.; Cosentini, E.; Galimberti, P. M.; Slavazzi, F.; Cattaneo, C.; Foscati, A.; Gaeta, R.; Ventura, L.; Cilli, J.; D’anastasio, R.; Viciano, J.; Monza, F.; Fanelli, E.; Capasso, L.; Cozza, A.; Magno, G.; Basso, C.; Thiene, G.; Zanatta, A.; Ciliberti, R.; Petralia, P.; Massa, E. Rabino, Bonsignore, A.; Ricci, S.; Capecchi, G.; Boschin, F.; Arrighi, S.; Ronchitelli, A.; Condemi, S.; Bini, A.; Bandiera, P.; Milanese, M.; Vellone, V. G.; Cinti, A.; Boano, R.; Garbarino, G. B.; Rocchietti, D.; Paudice, M.; Biatta, C. M.; Buffelli, F.; Minetti, G.; Fulcheri, E.; Biehler-Gomez, L.; Mattia, M.; Poppa, P.; Sala, C.; Petrosino, D.; Tagliabue, G.; Galimberti, P.; Slavazzi, F.; Cattaneo, C.; Emanuele, S.; Masotti, S.; Oggiano, M.; Gualdi-Russo, E.; Mongillo, J.; Vescovo, G.; Bramanti, B.; Guerriero, M.; Colasurdo, F.; Pollio, A. M.; Morrone, A.; Piombino-Mascali, D.; Toscano-Raffa, A.; Campagna, L.; Venuti, M.; Piombino-Mascali, D.; Morrone, A.; Tigano, G.; Maniscalco, L.; Distefano, G.; Cultraro, M.; Guzzardi, L.; Errickson, D.; Márquez-Grant, N.; Usai, G.; Milanese, M.; Bini, A.; Zedda, N.; Saguto, I.; Frisoni, P.; Rinaldo, N.; Roggio, C.; Bandiera, P.; Milanese, M.; Traversari, M.; Gabanini, G.; Ciucani, M. M.; Serventi, P.; De Fanti, S.; Sarno, S.; Fregnani, A.; Bazaj, A.; Ferri, G.; Cornaglia, G.; Gruppioni, G.; Luiselli, D.; Cilli, E.; Pangrazzi, C.; Tonina, E.; Tomasi, C.; Rossetti, C.; Larentis, O.; Tesi, C.; Ricci, S.; Crezzini, J.; Badino, P.; Rossetti, C.; Fusco, R.; Gorini, I.; Masseroli, S. M.; Licata, M.; Tonina, E.; Larentis, O.; Pangrazzi, C.; Licata, M.; Gorini, I.; Fusco, R.; Moroni, E.; Capuzzo, D.; Locatelli, D. P.; Bramanti, B.; Fusco, R.; Tesi, C.; Larentis, O.; Tonina, E.; Licata, M.; Magno, G.; Zampieri, F.; Zanatta, A.; Scianò, F.; Pasini, A.; Gualdi-Russo, E.; Rinaldo, N.; Bramanti, B.; Pasini, A.; Gualdi-Russo, E.; Bramanti, B.; Rinaldo, N.; Riccomi, G.; Minozzi, S.; Casaccia, J.; Felici, C.; Giuffra, V.; Licata, M.; Larentis, O.; Tesi, C.; Tonina, E.; Ciliberti, R.; Garanzini, F.; De Luca, D.; Lucà, M.; Patratanu, S. M.; Polidoro, F.; Guzzetti, S.; Fusco, R..
Pathologica ; 114(3):246-273, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1940091

ABSTRACT

The presence of numerous scientific contributions in the program is certainly demonstrative of the fact that research in the field of paleopathology and anthropology has not stopped since the beginning of Covid-19. Furthermore, the same emergency that we are still partially feeling, has pushed our community scientific research to question itself more intensely in connection to the epidemic relationship and measures that repeatedly led to profound transformations in the societies of the past from different points of view: demographic, economic, social and the history buried under the bioarchaeological strata is today more capable than ever to show this connection. It can do this by bringing to light the paleodemographic data that is obtained from the study of human remains. Today we will listen to many paleopathological stories and among these I am very happy to also present ours. Twenty years ago, the University of Insubria started a collaboration with the Archaeological Superintendence of Lombardy for the study of osteological remains found mostly during emergency archaeology recoveries. These experiences led us to reach those bioarchaeological sites again with the aim of extracting all those cemetery layers that remained there because they were not subjected at that time by building reclamation interventions. Returning to those sites that in the past brought to light fragmentary anthropological data means allowing oneself the possibility of obtaining new palaeodemographic and palaeopathological data which are decisive for reconstructing the demographic and epidemiological history of the populations of the past. These new interventions led us to create an operational model that immediately intended to underline the importance of an evident continuity between the archaeological recovery and the anthropological study of the finds through the setting up of physical anthropology and paleopathology laboratories directly on the sites of the finds. All this in harmony with the final design of the projects or the museumization of bioarchaeological sites in their complexity aimed at enhancing cultural tourist routes in the area. In this regard, I would like to thank the community foundation of Varese and the Cariplo foundation for supporting our current initiatives. These include the project financed by the emblematic provincial tender and which has as its final objective the enhancement of three bioarchaeological sites in Valcuvia: the medieval sites of San Biagio in Cittiglio, Sant’Agostino in Caravate, and the modern crypt of the church of the Convent of Azzio. Today, our Research Centre works in Piedmont in different sites in the province of Vercelli and Alessandria. Aware of the importance of a physical anthropological approach in the field, our young Centre goes beyond the continental borders to reach Eritrea, the ancient city of Adulis, because it is in dissecting the taphonomic events and the funeral actions that will make it possible to identify the funerary ritual adopted by the ancient populations. The operational model of paleopathological research, which gradually enriches itself thanks to the multidisciplinary nature of the interventions and thanks to the individual experiences in the field, is thus continuously transferred and adapted to other anthropological contexts that retain potential both in terms of investigative and enhancement of the bioarchaeological heritage. Through the musealization of the sites it is also possible to acquire an attractive force towards all those potentially bioarchaeological areas but which today are in conditions of neglect because they are marginal with respect to the conventionally understood cultural tourist good. And we all know how important it is to transfer the study data even outside the academic context because making this aspect of archaeology, the truly human one, usable too, cannot fail to arouse a strong awareness of our past. We also know how much more we will have to work, following in the footsteps of the professors who started this path, to ensure that the d sciplines of paleopathology and physical anthropology arrive within all those degree courses still discovered today by these teachings to heal an important lack: knowing the human past from a physical and pathological point of view allows us to understand the evolutionary path of some pathologies, especially those of infectious nature. If my title of the speech “Paleopathology and osteoarchaeology in the province of Varese” does not respond to what is being said today, it is because my feeling about paleopathology and osteoarchaeology in the province of Varese is understood as that of carrying out research, what I could feel everywhere, through the operational model, the enthusiasm for paleopathological research and of course the people I am lucky enough to work with. The Morgagni Museum of Pathological Anatomy of the University of Padua preserves a wide series of pathological specimens, mostly from the second half of the 19th century and the early 20th century. The Museum was recently renewed, as the result of an intervention of enhancement of the museum and cultural heritage of the University of Padua and its Medical School, being also testimony to the history and evolution of human pathology and past population lifestyle. In the collection of the Morgagni Museum there are several specimens affected by atherosclerotic lesions. Atherosclerosis is characterized by a chronic inflammatory disease in which different factors are involved, such as lipoproteins, immune cells and endothelial damage. The main clinical syndromes related to atherosclerosis are angina pectoris, acute myocardial infarction, transient ischemic attack, cerebral stroke, intermittent claudication, aortic aneurysm and nephro-vascular hypertension. Atherosclerosis was believed to be a modern disease, related almost exclusively to age and current lifestyle. The cases from the Morgagni Museum are therefore useful for studying the presence of the atherosclerosis in a recent past population. In the collection there were identified six atherosclerotic cases: an atherosclerotic aneurysm of the ascending aorta: the specimen highlights the left ventricular outflow tract and the aortic root. There is a severe atherosclerosis of the ascending aorta with saccular aneurysm including a large thrombus;a syphilitic aortitis complicated by atherosclerosis: the finding highlights the left ventricular outflow tract and aortic root. It is possible to note the intima of the ascending aorta with ulcer-calcific atherosclerotic plaques and “tree-bark” whitish areas;an atherosclerotic aneurysm of the abdominal aorta: abdominal aorta with saccular atherosclerotic aneurysm, proximal to the iliac bifurcation;a case of aortic atherosclerosis: aorta with severe atherosclerosis complicated by calcification and thrombosis;a case of aortic atherosclerosis: massive dissemination of atheromatous-calcific plaques;a case of aortic atherosclerosis with parietal thrombi: widespread presence of plaques along the aortic wall. Thanks to this collection, it is possible to notice the spread of pathology on an atheromatous basis in the recent past populations. Moreover, current paleopathological investigations on ancient populations mummified remains also showed traces of atherosclerotic lesions in both sexes and different ages. It is therefore possible to support a ubiquitous diffusion in space and time of this complex multifactorial pathology which has so far considered to be almost an exclusive prerogative of old age and current lifestyle. The Morgagni Museum of Pathological Anatomy of the University of Padua, founded by Lodovico Brunetti (1813-1899) in the 1860s, gathers important pathological specimens mainly from the 19th century. Among them, there is a very peculiar preparation: it consists of a dried head representing a case of argyria dating back to 1873. The specimen is preserved in a sealed jar, all the skin has a blue-gray coloration with white-blonde hair and beard. The eyes are not preserved, but since the ocular cavities remain open, it is possible to presume that origin lly there were glass eyes. Two glass sticks are inserted inside the mouth to show that also tongue and gums have the same blue-gray pigmentation as the face. The upper teeth are strongly eroded. Argyria is a rare disease caused by chronic absorption of products with a high silver content, which surpass body’s renal and hepatic excretory capacities, leading to silver granules being deposited in the skin and its appendages, mucosae and internal organs. It is characterized by blue-gray or black staining of the skin and mucous membranes. Our case was first mentioned in 1862 as a syphilitic man who was treating himself with some caustic silver nitrate, the so called “infernal stone”, since 1840s. According to him, this medicament cured the syphilis, but turned him into a “graphite man”. The patient died in 1873 of an intestinal infection, most likely related to the prolonged ingestion of the silver nitrate. This case was described as “spectacular” by Austrian dermatologist Isidor Neumann (1832-1906), who studied a sample of the tongue of the specimen sent by Brunetti. In fact, Brunetti performed the autopsy on the body of the individual and prepared also a plaster cast of the head along with the sample for Neumann. Thus, we can assume Brunetti was also the one who preserved the original head, taxidermizing it (so-called stuffed head preparation) in order to preserve the skin color, because his famous tannisation method would not maintained the original characteristics. Human taxidermy is quite rare, and it is limited to a few cases in the 19th century. Moreover, there are just a few known human stuffed heads in the world, making the Paduan specimen particularly unique both for the pathology and the technique used for the preparation.

5.
International Journal of Morphology ; 40(2):474-479, 2022.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1928742

ABSTRACT

The recent COVID-19 pandemic has shaken up society, having a significant impact on the field of health and research. Given its relevance, studies have been performed on the effects of SARS-CoV-2 on human physiology. In particular, the possible presence and transmission of the virus through the male reproductive system could affect reproductive success. Knowing if the presence of the virus disrupts the organs responsible for the development and maturation of the cell lines involved in spermatogenesis could reveal its implications in sperm quality. For that reason, we proposed this review, in order to analyze the main scientific evidence on the effects of SARS-CoV-2 on the histophysiology of the male reproductive system and sperm fertilizing capacity.

6.
Obstetrics and Gynecology ; 139(SUPPL 1):72S, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1925406

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Pregnancy carries increased risk factors for severe COVID-19 and adverse obstetric outcomes. Yet, it has not been evaluated whether increased risk during pregnancy varies with age. We sought to evaluate the risk of severity and adverse obstetric outcomes in SARS-CoV-2 positive adolescent patients compared to both non-infected adolescent and infected non-adolescent subjects. METHODS: Retrospective study across four Inova Health System Hospitals between March 2020 and January 2021. Patients were grouped by age and SARS-CoV-2 status: (i) adolescents (aged 14-19 years) SARSCoV- 2-positive, (ii) adolescents SARS-CoV-2-negative, and (iii) adults (age >20 years) SARS-CoV-2-positive. Statistical pairwise and regression analyses evaluated differences in disease distribution, severity, rates of prematurity, and cesarean delivery (CD) between group (i) and groups (ii) and (iii). RESULTS: Compared to SARS-CoV-2-negative adolescents (n5394), SARS-CoV-2-positive adolescents (n548) were more likely to be Hispanic (91.7% versus 12.2%;adjusted P<.001), be uninsured (50% versus 7.9%;adjusted P<.001), require CD (25% versus 11.9%;adjusted P=.03), and deliver at greater gestational age (39 1/7 versus 38 4/7 weeks;adjusted P=.002). Compared to adult SARS-CoV-2- positive patients (n5695), adolescent SARS-CoV-2-positive patients were more likely to be Hispanic (91.7% versus 74.5%;adjusted P=.006), asymptomatic (79.2% versus 60.7%;adjusted P=.03), and to deliver at greater gestational age (39 1/7 versus 37 6/7 weeks;adjusted P=.004). We found no significant difference in the rates of prematurity, fetal growth restriction, NICU admission, and stillbirth. CONCLUSION: SARS-CoV-2 unequally affects Hispanic and uninsured adolescent pregnant patients. Infected adolescents are at high risk for CD compared to their non-infected adolescent counterparts. Infected pregnant adolescents tend to present with fewer COVID-19 symptoms compared to infected pregnant adults.Other obstetric outcomes were comparable among groups.

7.
Electronic Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine ; 32(2):255-264, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1870986

ABSTRACT

Introduction Blood test alterations are crucial in SARS CoV-2 (COVID-19) patients. Blood parameters, such as lymphocytes, C reactive protein (CRP), creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase, or D-dimer, are associated with severity and prognosis of SARS CoV-2 patients. This study aims to identify blood-related predictors of severe hospitalization in patients diagnosed with SARS CoV-2. Methods Observational retrospective study of all rt-PCR and blood-test positive (at 48 hours of hospitalization) SARS CoV-2 diagnosed inpatients between March-May 2020. Deceased and/or ICU inpatients were considered as severe cases, whereas those patients after hospital discharge were considered as non-severe. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify predictors of severity, based on bivariate contrast between severe and mild inpatients. Results The overall sample comprised 540 patients, with 374 mild cases (69.26%), and 166 severe cases (30.75%). The multivariate logistic regression model for predicting SARS CoV-2 severity included lymphocytes, C reactive protein (CRP), creatinine, total protein levels, glucose and aspartate aminotransferase as predictors, showing an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.895 at a threshold of 0.29, with 81.5% of sensitivity and 81% of specificity. Discussion Our results suggest that our predictive model allows identifying and stratifying SARS CoV-2 patients in risk of developing severe medical complications based on blood-test parameters easily measured at hospital admission, improving health-care resources management and distribution. © 2021 International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. All rights reserved.

8.
International Journal of Morphology ; 39(6):1663-1668, 2021.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1863070

ABSTRACT

One of the challenges in the use of new methodologies and technologies during the health crisis caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus has been to keep students motivated in virtual environments. Therefore, the objective of this work was to assess the usefulness of audiovisual materials created with chroma key in the flipped classroom methodology to teach some theoretical concepts in the subject of Developmental Biology in the Degree in Biology at the University of Alicante. For this, the teaching staff of the subject produced videos using chroma key technology, which were viewed by the students before the online theoretical sessions. During these sessions, the students put into practice the concepts discussed in the videos by carrying out activities. The students' perception of the methodology used was obtained through an opinion questionnaire, in which 90 % of the respondents stated that the combined use of the flipped classroom with chroma key facilitated learning by adapting to the rhythm and educational needs of each student. They also highlighted that the use of virtual scenery with chroma key made online teaching more enjoyable and attractive. In conclusion, the chroma key is an effective tool for creating educational materials in the flipped classroom that is also attractive and motivating for students.

9.
Museological Review ; 25:66-79, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1837219

ABSTRACT

This paper proposes an analysis of the impact of COVID-19 on Spanish cultural institutions based on the reflections that arose from the public meeting 'Culture and COVID: a conversation about artistic spaces and practices in Madrid' (November 14, 2020). The authors addressed this debate as a case study, which is considered a result of a broader discussion about the challenges and issues facing art and cultural spaces today. Historical, institutional, and temporal contexts are provided to situate the debate and further discussions. Key concepts such as culture as 'non-essential' activity, the 'caring' role of cultural institutions, and the conversion to virtualization are integrated, through an ecofeminist approach. The notion of 'good life', which emerged from Spanish and Latin American ecofeminisms, is proposed as a transversal axis to think about the different challenges hatched by the pandemic in the cultural sphere.

10.
European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging ; 23(SUPPL 1):i103-i104, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1795326

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Myocardial damage has been widely described in patients with COVID-19. Right ventriculoarterial coupling (RVAC) is a marker of subclinical myocardial damage. The association with mortality in COVID-19 patients has been recently investigated. Objectives: To determine if there is a difference in patients with abnormal vs normal RVAC, in clinical, laboratory and echocardiographic variables. Analyze if there is an association between the presence of abnormal RVAC and one-year mortality. Investigate the cutoff value of the RVAC to predict mortality. Methods.: A single-center, prospective, analytical study. Patients with a diagnosis of COVID-19 were included. Patients who were on mechanical ventilation during the study, a history of ischemic heart disease, valvular heart disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were excluded. The patients were included during the period from May to August 2020, the 1-year follow-up was carried out through the electronic medical record and telephone calls. The echocardiograms were performed with the Phillips IE-33, the strain determination was obtained with the Qlab 13.0 software. The quantitative variables were compared with the Student's T test or the U Mann-Whitney test, according to the normality of the variables;qualitative variables were contrasted with the x2 test. One-year survival was determined with the Kaplan-Meier curves, and the association with one-year mortality was investigated with Cox regression. The cut-off value for predicting mortality was determined with ROC curves. The RVAC was determined with the right ventricular free wall longitudinal strain / pulmonary systolic artery pressure ratio. Abnormal right ventriculoarterial coupling was determined with a value less than 0.8. Results: 81 patients were included, of whom 45 had an abnormal RVAC. Patients with abnormal RVAC had higher mortality and a higher requirement for mechanical ventilation;they had higher levels of biomarkers. Among the echocardiographic variables, they had lower the right ventricular fractional area change, the tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, the left ventricular longitudinal strain, the left atrial reservoir strain, the right ventricular free wall longitudinal strain, the RVAC;while they also presented higher the pulmonary systolic artery pressure and the tricuspid regurgitation velocity. The one-year survival of patients with abnormal RVAC was 53% vs 91%, the association with 1-year mortality was HR: 7.0 (CI95 2.1-23;p = 0.0001). The cutoff value of the RVAC to predict mortality was <0.48 (Sensitivity 71%, Specificity 90%, AUC: 0.836;p = <0.0001). Conclusion: The patients with COVID-19 and an abnormal RVAC had a higher requirement for mechanical ventilation and mortality;presented higher levels of biomarkers. Half of the patients with abnormal RVAC died, presenting an association to predict mortality. The cut-off value of <0.48 was the best associated with mortality.

11.
Medicina Intensiva ; 46(3):132-139, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1777103

ABSTRACT

Objective: Higher blood nitrate and nitrite levels have been found in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients than in healthy subjects. The present study explores the potential association between serum nitrate levels and mortality in COVID-19 patients. Design: A prospective observation study was carried out. Setting: Eight Intensive Care Units (ICUs) from 6 hospitals in the Canary Islands (Spain). Patients: COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU. Interventions: Determination of serum nitrate levels at ICU admission. Main variable of interest: Mortality at 30 days. Results: Non-surviving (n=11) compared to surviving patients (n=42) showed higher APACHE-II (p< 0.001) and SOFA scores (p=0.004), and higher serum nitrate levels (p=0.001). Logistic regression analyses showed serum nitrate levels to be associated to 30-day mortality after controlling for SOFA (OR = 1.021;95%CI =1.006-1.036;p = 0.01) or APACHE-II (OR = 1.023;95%CI =1.006-1.041;p= 0.01). There were no differences in the area under the curve (AUC) for mortality prediction by serum nitrate levels (AUC = 83%;95%CI =73-92%;p< 0.001), APACHE II (AUC = 85%;95%CI =75-96%;p<0.001) and SOFA (AUC = 78%;95%CI =63-92%;p= 0.005) based on the DeLong method. The Kaplan-Meier analysis found patients with serum nitrates levels > 68.4 mu mol/l to have a higher mortality rate (hazard ratio =138.8;95%CI = 22.3-863.9;p< 0.001). Conclusions: The main novel finding was the association between serum nitrate levels and mortality in COVID-19 patients controlling for the SOFA or APACHE-II scores, though larger studies are needed to confirm this observation. (C) 2020 Elsevier Espana, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

13.
Medicina intensiva ; 46(3):132-139, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1710785

ABSTRACT

Objective Higher blood nitrate and nitrite levels have been found in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients than in healthy subjects. The present study explores the potential association between serum nitrate levels and mortality in COVID-19 patients. Design A prospective observation study was carried out. Setting Eight Intensive Care Units (ICUs) from 6 hospitals in the Canary Islands (Spain). Patients COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU. Interventions Determination of serum nitrate levels at ICU admission. Main variable of interest Mortality at 30 days. Results Non-surviving (n = 11) compared to surviving patients (n = 42) showed higher APACHE-II (p < 0.001) and SOFA scores (p = 0.004), and higher serum nitrate levels (p = 0.001). Logistic regression analyses showed serum nitrate levels to be associated to 30-day mortality after controlling for SOFA (OR = 1.021;95%CI = 1.006–1.036;p = 0.01) or APACHE-II (OR = 1.023;95%CI = 1.006–1.041;p = 0.01). There were no differences in the area under the curve (AUC) for mortality prediction by serum nitrate levels (AUC = 83%;95%CI = 73–92%;p < 0.001), APACHE II (AUC = 85%;95%CI = 75–96%;p < 0.001) and SOFA (AUC = 78%;95%CI = 63–92%;p = 0.005) based on the DeLong method. The Kaplan–Meier analysis found patients with serum nitrates levels > 68.4 μmol/l to have a higher mortality rate (hazard ratio = 138.8;95%CI = 22.3–863.9;p < 0.001). Conclusions The main novel finding was the association between serum nitrate levels and mortality in COVID-19 patients controlling for the SOFA or APACHE-II scores, though larger studies are needed to confirm this observation.

15.
Med Intensiva (Engl Ed) ; 46(3): 132-139, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1704136

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Higher blood nitrate and nitrite levels have been found in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients than in healthy subjects. The present study explores the potential association between serum nitrate levels and mortality in COVID-19 patients. DESIGN: A prospective observation study was carried out. SETTING: Eight Intensive Care Units (ICUs) from 6 hospitals in the Canary Islands (Spain). PATIENTS: COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU. INTERVENTIONS: Determination of serum nitrate levels at ICU admission. MAIN VARIABLE OF INTEREST: Mortality at 30 days. RESULTS: Non-surviving (n=11) compared to surviving patients (n=42) showed higher APACHE-II (p<0.001) and SOFA scores (p=0.004), and higher serum nitrate levels (p=0.001). Logistic regression analyses showed serum nitrate levels to be associated to 30-day mortality after controlling for SOFA (OR=1.021; 95%CI=1.006-1.036; p=0.01) or APACHE-II (OR=1.023; 95%CI=1.006-1.041; p=0.01). There were no differences in the area under the curve (AUC) for mortality prediction by serum nitrate levels (AUC=83%; 95%CI=73-92%; p<0.001), APACHE II (AUC=85%; 95%CI=75-96%; p<0.001) and SOFA (AUC=78%; 95%CI=63-92%; p=0.005) based on the DeLong method. The Kaplan-Meier analysis found patients with serum nitrates levels>68.4µmol/l to have a higher mortality rate (hazard ratio=138.8; 95%CI=22.3-863.9; p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The main novel finding was the association between serum nitrate levels and mortality in COVID-19 patients controlling for the SOFA or APACHE-II scores, though larger studies are needed to confirm this observation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nitrates , APACHE , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Boletin de la Asociacion de Geografos Espanoles ; (91)2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1593658

ABSTRACT

Tourism was a constantly growing industry until the halt brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. In cities, its negative impact was increasing, with significant cases of overcrowding. COVID-19 has emerged as an exceptional disruptive stage, yet it is also an opportunity to abandon the rush towards unsustainability. This study is a critical analysis of tourism, looking at the most appropriate post-pandemic perspective for urban cultural tourism, based on sustainability and leaving aside the search for profit as the ultimate goal. The main objective is to make proposals for an alternative paradigm. This is a theoretical paper that draws on a literature review of 180 works of scientific reference. Complementarily, information published by the media is accessed and direct observation is carried out as fieldwork. Proposals are made on limiting the number of visitors, improving guided visits, tourist routes, experiential tourism, and virtual tours. We also propose a new centralised tourism governance and regulation of private agents. Therefore, the present text is of interest for public representatives working in the field of urban tourism. © 2021 Asociacion de Geografos Espanoles. All rights reserved.

18.
Ostaszewski, M.; Niarakis, A.; Mazein, A.; Kuperstein, I.; Phair, R.; Orta-Resendiz, A.; Singh, V.; Aghamiri, S. S.; Acencio, M. L.; Glaab, E.; Ruepp, A.; Fobo, G.; Montrone, C.; Brauner, B.; Frishman, G.; Gomez, L. C. M.; Somers, J.; Hoch, M.; Gupta, S. K.; Scheel, J.; Borlinghaus, H.; Czauderna, T.; Schreiber, F.; Montagud, A.; de Leon, M. P.; Funahashi, A.; Hiki, Y.; Hiroi, N.; Yamada, T. G.; Drager, A.; Renz, A.; Naveez, M.; Bocskei, Z.; Messina, F.; Bornigen, D.; Fergusson, L.; Conti, M.; Rameil, M.; Nakonecnij, V.; Vanhoefer, J.; Schmiester, L.; Wang, M. Y.; Ackerman, E. E.; Shoemaker, J. E.; Zucker, J.; Oxford, K.; Teuton, J.; Kocakaya, E.; Summak, G. Y.; Hanspers, K.; Kutmon, M.; Coort, S.; Eijssen, L.; Ehrhart, F.; Rex, D. A. B.; Slenter, D.; Martens, M.; Pham, N.; Haw, R.; Jassal, B.; Matthews, L.; Orlic-Milacic, M.; Senff-Ribeiro, A.; Rothfels, K.; Shamovsky, V.; Stephan, R.; Sevilla, C.; Varusai, T.; Ravel, J. M.; Fraser, R.; Ortseifen, V.; Marchesi, S.; Gawron, P.; Smula, E.; Heirendt, L.; Satagopam, V.; Wu, G. M.; Riutta, A.; Golebiewski, M.; Owen, S.; Goble, C.; Hu, X. M.; Overall, R. W.; Maier, D.; Bauch, A.; Gyori, B. M.; Bachman, J. A.; Vega, C.; Groues, V.; Vazquez, M.; Porras, P.; Licata, L.; Iannuccelli, M.; Sacco, F.; Nesterova, A.; Yuryev, A.; de Waard, A.; Turei, D.; Luna, A.; Babur, O.; Soliman, S.; Valdeolivas, A.; Esteban-Medina, M.; Pena-Chilet, M.; Rian, K.; Helikar, T.; Puniya, B. L.; Modos, D.; Treveil, A.; Olbei, M.; De Meulder, B.; Ballereau, S.; Dugourd, A.; Naldi, A.; Noel, V.; Calzone, L.; Sander, C.; Demir, E.; Korcsmaros, T.; Freeman, T. C.; Auge, F.; Beckmann, J. S.; Hasenauer, J.; Wolkenhauer, O.; Willighagen, E. L.; Pico, A. R.; Evelo, C. T.; Gillespie, M. E.; Stein, L. D.; Hermjakob, H.; D'Eustachio, P.; Saez-Rodriguez, J.; Dopazo, J.; Valencia, A.; Kitano, H.; Barillot, E.; Auffray, C.; Balling, R.; Schneider, R.; Community, Covid- Dis Map.
Molecular Systems Biology ; 17(12):2, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1589729
19.
International Journal of Morphology ; 39(6):1663-1668, 2021.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1576236

ABSTRACT

One of the challenges in the use of new methodologies and technologies during the health crisis caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus has been to keep students motivated in virtual environments. Therefore, the objective of this work was to assess the usefulness of audiovisual materials created with chroma key in the flipped classroom methodology to teach some theoretical concepts in the subject of Developmental Biology in the Degree in Biology at the University of Alicante. For this, the teaching staff of the subject produced videosusing chroma key technology, which were viewed by the students before the online theoretical sessions. During the sesessions, the students put into practice the concepts discussed in the videos by carrying out activities. The students' perception of the methodology used was obtained through an opinion questionnaire, in which 90 % of the respondents stated that the combined use of the flipped classroom with chroma key facilitated learning by adapting to the rhythm and educational needs of each student. They also highlighted that the use of virtual scenery with chroma key made online teaching more enjoyable and attractive. In conclusion, the chroma key is an effective tool for creating educational materials in the flipped classroom that is also attractive and motivating for students

20.
Revista Universidad Y Sociedad ; 13:212-219, 2021.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1557938

ABSTRACT

Nowadays companies and tourism need to make themselves known by different means and among them the most used is marketing because they develop competitively in the market. Quevedo is a tourist city in Ecuador, constituted as one of the most important river ports of the country and therefore seeks to generate tourism in the River Route Avenue through entrepreneurship, that by the global economic crisis COVID-19 some establishments had to close, others went bankrupt and the economy was destabilized generating unemployment and that is where the question is born How to provide access to tourist information for visitors arriving in the Canton Quevedo? The objective was to design strategies for the use of digital marketing through "QR" codes as elements that facilitate access to tourist information for visitors to the city of Quevedo. In the investigation the qualitative and quantitative methodology was used, allowing through the methods the theoretical analysis inductive, deductive, descriptive, descriptive, mathematical statistics that allowed to obtain from the surveys necessary information for the promotion of tourist sites, establishing necessary resources and strategies, achieving in the course explain the technology with information of the "QR" codes for the implementation in the different ventures allowing to see the functionalities, resources necessary technology to publicize the implementation of online marketing in the canton Quevedo through technological programs easy to obtain from any device.

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