Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
Psychol Trauma ; 12(S1): S168-S170, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-616908

ABSTRACT

The unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic has put a great strain on the physical and mental health of health care workers across the globe. This commentary provides an overview of mental health initiatives implemented at an academic medical center to support health care workers during this challenging time and highlights lessons learned. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers , Coronavirus Infections , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health Services , Mental Health , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Adult , Humans , Medical Informatics Applications , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , New York
2.
J Public Health (Oxf) ; 42(3): 448-450, 2020 Aug 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-599278

ABSTRACT

In the midst of widespread community transmission of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in New York, residents have sought information about COVID-19. We analyzed trends in New York State (NYS) and New York City (NYC) data to quantify the extent of COVID-19-related queries. Data on the number of 311 calls in NYC, Google Trend data on the search term 'Coronavirus' and information about trends in COVID-19 cases in NYS and the USA were compiled from multiple sources. There were 1228 994 total calls to 311 between 22 January 2020 and 22 April 2020, with 50 845 calls specific to COVID-19 in the study period. The proportion of 311 calls related to COVID-19 increased over time, while the 'interest over time' of the search term 'Coronavirus' has exponentially increased since the end of February 2020. It is vital that public health officials provide clear and up-to-date information about protective measures and crucial communications to respond to information-seeking behavior across NYC.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Information Seeking Behavior , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , Public Health/trends , Betacoronavirus , Forecasting , Humans , New York , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Population Surveillance
3.
Int Arch Occup Environ Health ; 2020 May 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-343100

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Disaster workers are at elevated risk for mental health problems as a result of trauma exposures during response efforts. One possible way to prevent mental health problems is to build-up coping resources that promote resilience to the effects of disaster work. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a resilience building workshop, the Disaster Worker Resiliency Training Program (DWRT), in disaster workers previously exposed to Hurricane Sandy. METHODS: Disaster workers (N = 167) were randomly assigned to the DWRT workshop (n = 78) or a waitlist (n = 89). Workers completed self-report measures on healthy lifestyle behaviors, perceived stress, depression, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms at baseline and 3-month follow-up. They also completed a measure assessing subsequent trauma-exposure between the baseline and 3-month post-intervention. RESULTS: Participants in the workshop condition, as compared to those in a waitlist control, reported significantly greater improvements from pre-intervention (T1) to 3-month follow-up (T2) in healthy lifestyle behaviors (η2 = .03; p = .03), stress management (η2 = .03, p = .04), and spiritual growth (η2 = .03, p = .02). Among participants reporting subsequent trauma exposures between T1 and T2  (n = 101), participants in the waitlist condition, were more likely to report significant increases in perceived stress (η2 = .07, p < .01), PTSD (η2 = .05, p = .03), and depression (η2 = .07, p < .01) symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Participation in the resilience workshop promoted engagement in positive health behaviors and reduced the incidence of mental health symptoms, especially when administered prior to a repeat trauma exposure. Further research is needed to evaluate the long-term health effects of participation in the program.

4.
Am J Forensic Med Pathol ; 41(3): 143-151, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-215983

ABSTRACT

As a result of the 2019 novel human coronavirus (COVID-19) global spread, medical examiner/coroner offices will inevitably encounter increased numbers of COVID-19-infected decedents at autopsy. While in some cases a history of fever and/or respiratory distress (eg, cough or shortness of breath) may suggest the diagnosis, epidemiologic studies indicate that the majority of individuals infected with COVID-19 develop mild to no symptoms. Those dying with-but not of-COVID-19 may still be infectious, however. While multiple guidelines have been issued regarding autopsy protocol in cases of suspected COVID-19 deaths, there is some variability in the recommendations. Additionally, limited recommendations to date have been issued regarding scene investigative protocol, and there is a paucity of publications characterizing COVID-19 postmortem gross and histologic findings. A case of sudden unexpected death due to COVID-19 is presented as a means of illustrating common autopsy findings, as well as diagnostic and biosafety considerations. We also review and summarize the current COVID-19 literature in an effort to provide practical evidence-based biosafety guidance for medical examiner-coroner offices encountering COVID-19 at autopsy.


Subject(s)
Autopsy/standards , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Containment of Biohazards/standards , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Mortuary Practice/methods , Mortuary Practice/standards , Pandemics , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/standards , Triage , United States
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL