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1.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 3645, 2022 06 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1908172

ABSTRACT

Recombination is an evolutionary process by which many pathogens generate diversity and acquire novel functions. Although a common occurrence during coronavirus replication, detection of recombination is only feasible when genetically distinct viruses contemporaneously infect the same host. Here, we identify an instance of SARS-CoV-2 superinfection, whereby an individual was infected with two distinct viral variants: Alpha (B.1.1.7) and Epsilon (B.1.429). This superinfection was first noted when an Alpha genome sequence failed to exhibit the classic S gene target failure behavior used to track this variant. Full genome sequencing from four independent extracts reveals that Alpha variant alleles comprise around 75% of the genomes, whereas the Epsilon variant alleles comprise around 20% of the sample. Further investigation reveals the presence of numerous recombinant haplotypes spanning the genome, specifically in the spike, nucleocapsid, and ORF 8 coding regions. These findings support the potential for recombination to reshape SARS-CoV-2 genetic diversity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Superinfection , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , New York City/epidemiology , Recombination, Genetic , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
2.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4886, 2021 08 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349666

ABSTRACT

Wide-scale SARS-CoV-2 genome sequencing is critical to tracking viral evolution during the ongoing pandemic. We develop the software tool, Variant Database (VDB), for quickly examining the changing landscape of spike mutations. Using VDB, we detect an emerging lineage of SARS-CoV-2 in the New York region that shares mutations with previously reported variants. The most common sets of spike mutations in this lineage (now designated as B.1.526) are L5F, T95I, D253G, E484K or S477N, D614G, and A701V. This lineage was first sequenced in late November 2020. Phylodynamic inference confirmed the rapid growth of the B.1.526 lineage. In concert with other variants, like B.1.1.7, the rise of B.1.526 appears to have extended the duration of the second wave of COVID-19 cases in NYC in early 2021. Pseudovirus neutralization experiments demonstrated that B.1.526 spike mutations adversely affect the neutralization titer of convalescent and vaccinee plasma, supporting the public health relevance of this lineage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/epidemiology , Genome, Viral , Humans , Models, Molecular , Mutation , New York/epidemiology , Phylogeny , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Software , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
3.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis ; 101(3): 115468, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293712

ABSTRACT

Nasal and nasopharyngeal swab specimens tested by the Cepheid Xpert Xpress SARS-CoV-2 were analyzed by whole-genome sequencing based on impaired detection of the N2 target. Each viral genome had at least one mutation in the N gene, which likely arose independently in the New York City and Pittsburgh study sites.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Cities/epidemiology , Databases, Genetic , Genome, Viral , Humans , Mutation , Phosphoproteins/genetics , United States/epidemiology
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