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1.
Braz J Psychiatry ; 2021 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1862338

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To improve the ability of psychiatry researchers to build, deploy, maintain, reproduce, and share their own psychophysiological tasks. Psychophysiological tasks are a useful tool for studying human behavior driven by mental processes such as cognitive control, reward evaluation, and learning. Neural mechanisms during behavioral tasks are often studied via simultaneous electrophysiological recordings. Popular online platforms such as Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk) and Prolific enable deployment of tasks to numerous participants simultaneously. However, there is currently no task-creation framework available for flexibly deploying tasks both online and during simultaneous electrophysiology. METHODS: We developed a task creation template, termed Honeycomb, that standardizes best practices for building jsPsych-based tasks. Honeycomb offers continuous deployment configurations for seamless transition between use in research settings and at home. Further, we have curated a public library, termed BeeHive, of ready-to-use tasks. RESULTS: We demonstrate the benefits of using Honeycomb tasks with a participant in an ongoing study of deep brain stimulation for obsessive compulsive disorder, who completed repeated tasks both in the clinic and at home. CONCLUSION: Honeycomb enables researchers to deploy tasks online, in clinic, and at home in more ecologically valid environments and during concurrent electrophysiology.

2.
Psychiatry Res ; 313: 114610, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1821457

ABSTRACT

Until recently, psychotherapies, including exposure and response prevention (ERP) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), have primarily been delivered in-person. The COVID-19 pandemic required OCD providers delivering ERP to quickly transition to telehealth services. While evidence supports telehealth ERP delivery, limited research has examined OCD provider perceptions about patient characteristics that are most appropriate for this modality, as well as provider abilities to identify and address factors interfering with effective telehealth ERP. In the present study, OCD therapists (N = 113) rated the feasibility of delivering telehealth ERP relative to in-person for different (1) patient age-groups, (2) levels of OCD severity, and (3) provider ability to identify and address factors interfering with ERP during in-person and telehealth ERP (e.g., cognitive avoidance, reassurance seeking, etc.). Providers reported significantly greater feasibility of delivering telehealth ERP to individuals ages 13-to-65-years relative to other age groups assessed. Greater perceived feasibility for telehealth relative to in-person ERP was reported for lower versus higher symptom severity levels. Lastly, providers felt better able to identify and address problematic factors in-person. These findings suggest that providers should practice appropriate caution when offering telehealth ERP for certain patients with OCD. Future research may examine how to address these potential limitations of telehealth ERP delivery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Humans , Middle Aged , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
3.
J Obsessive Compuls Relat Disord ; 33: 100722, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1693223

ABSTRACT

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an impairing mental health condition defined by intense distress in the presence of unwanted, recurrent thoughts, images, or impulses which are accompanied by compulsions and avoidance performed to reduce distress. During the COVID-19 pandemic, OCD has continued to be an impairing mental health condition regardless of symptom dimensionality (e.g., contamination, harm, etc.) with varying reports of the overall clinical course. However, changes in the assessment, treatment, and diagnosis of OCD have occurred to personalize care and be aligned with public health guidelines. Exposure and response prevention and pharmacotherapy remain the treatment of choice, even though the setting in which treatment is conducted may have shifted. Telehealth in particular has been a 'game-changer' for clinicians and patients alike. Given the continued health risk posed by the pandemic, treatment personalization should still be made to ensure safety for both patients and providers while balancing efficacy and patient preferences.

4.
J Affect Disord ; 301: 130-137, 2022 Mar 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616547

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to increased stress, anxiety, and depression in children. A six-session, parent-led, transdiagnostic, cognitive-behavioral teletherapy program was adapted from an established protocol to help youth aged between 5 and 13 years manage emotional problems during the pandemic. METHODS: One-hundred twenty-nine parents of youth struggling with emotional problems during the COVID-19 pandemic participated in the program. Parents reported on their children's psychosocial functioning before and after treatment using validated assessments. They also reported on treatment satisfaction. Clinician-rated global improvement was assessed at each session to determine clinically significant treatment response. RESULTS: Significant improvements in parent proxy-reported anxiety (d = 0.56), depression (d = 0.69), stress (d = 0.61), anger (d = 0.69), family relationships (d = 0.32), and COVID-19-related distress (d = 1.08) were found, with 62% of participants who completed the program being classified as treatment responders. Parents reported high levels of satisfaction with the program. LIMITATIONS: This study was limited by use of primarily parent-report assessments and a lack of a control group. CONCLUSIONS: Brief, parent-led, transdiagnostic cognitive-behavioral teletherapy appeared to be an effective way to help youth cope with the pandemic and may be a scalable framework in response to large-scale mental health crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Cognition , Depression , Humans , Parents , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Child Health Care ; 51(2): 213-234, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1557010

ABSTRACT

Given that children and adolescents are at critical periods of development, they may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Using a descriptive phenomenological approach, 71 parents' observations of their child's mental health difficulties were explored. Parents sought out treatment because their children were experiencing significant distress. Data used were transcribed from baseline questionnaires and therapy summaries. Data analysis revealed three themes: emotion regulation difficulties, hypervigilance, and despair. The search for strategies and tailored interventions to help mitigate the potential harmful and long-term mental health impacts of the pandemic should be at the forefront of research and clinical practice.

7.
Curr Psychiatry Rep ; 23(11): 71, 2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453879

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This systematic review evaluated the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on obsessive-compulsive symptoms. RECENT FINDINGS: Most studies showed that obsessive-compulsive symptoms worsened during the early stages of the pandemic, particularly for individuals with contamination-related obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), though other symptoms dimensions were found to worsen as well. Many patients and individuals in the general population experienced new obsessive-compulsive-like symptoms centered on COVID-19. Self-reported rates of symptom exacerbation and COVID-19-focused symptoms were consistently lower in studies that recruited patients from specialty clinics (compared to online samples). Most studies were conducted in Spring/Summer, 2020. The COVID-19 pandemic has been an enormous stressor for individuals with OCD, especially for those with contamination symptoms. Regardless, there is strong reason to believe gold standard treatment approaches for OCD have maintained strong efficacy. Disseminating and effectively delivering evidence-based treatments for OCD is an urgent public health priority.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder , Humans , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report
8.
Bull Menninger Clin ; 85(3): 283-297, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211728

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has impacted life for people throughout the world, especially for those in health care who experience unique stressors. To support the psychological needs of staff, faculty, and learners at a biomedical sciences university, faculty at Baylor College of Medicine created a mental health and wellness support program consisting of multiple behavioral health care pathways, including phone support, a self-guided mental health app, a coping skills group, and individual therapy services. The authors present this program as a model for academic institutions to support the well-being of faculty, staff, and learners.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Faculty/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Psychotherapy/methods , Students, Medical/psychology , Telemedicine/methods , Academic Medical Centers , Adaptation, Psychological , Humans , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Health , Mobile Applications , Psychotherapy, Group , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological
9.
Front Hum Neurosci ; 15: 644593, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194590

ABSTRACT

We estimate that 208,000 deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices have been implanted to address neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders worldwide. DBS Think Tank presenters pooled data and determined that DBS expanded in its scope and has been applied to multiple brain disorders in an effort to modulate neural circuitry. The DBS Think Tank was founded in 2012 providing a space where clinicians, engineers, researchers from industry and academia discuss current and emerging DBS technologies and logistical and ethical issues facing the field. The emphasis is on cutting edge research and collaboration aimed to advance the DBS field. The Eighth Annual DBS Think Tank was held virtually on September 1 and 2, 2020 (Zoom Video Communications) due to restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic. The meeting focused on advances in: (1) optogenetics as a tool for comprehending neurobiology of diseases and on optogenetically-inspired DBS, (2) cutting edge of emerging DBS technologies, (3) ethical issues affecting DBS research and access to care, (4) neuromodulatory approaches for depression, (5) advancing novel hardware, software and imaging methodologies, (6) use of neurophysiological signals in adaptive neurostimulation, and (7) use of more advanced technologies to improve DBS clinical outcomes. There were 178 attendees who participated in a DBS Think Tank survey, which revealed the expansion of DBS into several indications such as obesity, post-traumatic stress disorder, addiction and Alzheimer's disease. This proceedings summarizes the advances discussed at the Eighth Annual DBS Think Tank.

10.
Personalized Medicine in Psychiatry ; 27-28:100079, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1164328

ABSTRACT

This commentary outlines assessment and treatment of patients with OCD during the era of COVID-19. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has required providers to make important considerations in treatment, including how usual risk is defined, as well as the use of personal protective equipment and telehealth services. These considerations have allowed providers to continue using both reliable and valid assessment procedures, as well as previously established and efficacious interventions. These adjustments create a context in which patient care for OCD remains fundamentally unchanged;however, important considerations should still be made because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

11.
Psychiatry Res ; 295: 113597, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-943548

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created novel mental health challenges for those with pre-existing problems including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Our study reports on clinician perceptions regarding the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients with OCD receiving exposure and response prevention treatment (ERP) prior to and during the pandemic. Participating clinicians completed a survey which included questions adapted from National Institute of Mental Health-Global Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (NIMH-GOCS) and Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS). Clinicians rated clinical features at treatment initiation, just prior to the pandemic, and mid-pandemic (July/August, 2020). Findings suggest that the COVID-19 pandemic was associated with attenuation of ERP progress from expected rates in most patients during first several months of the pandemic; clinicians estimated that 38% of their patients had symptoms worsen during the pandemic and 47% estimated that symptoms remained unchanged despite participating in ERP. Those who endured financial distress or were medically at-risk for severe COVID-19 disease had worse ERP course. Adults also had a worse ERP course during than pandemic than youth. Further research is needed to better understand the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on OCD symptomatology and treatment trajectory post-pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Implosive Therapy , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/therapy , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Adolescent , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/physiopathology , Symptom Flare Up , Young Adult
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