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1.
J Adolesc Health ; 70(4): 673-676, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587413

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess changes in adolescent visits with substance use disorders (SUDs) at children's hospitals during COVID-19. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adolescents (11-18 years) with SUD diagnoses during a hospital visit in the Pediatric Health Information System. Study periods were defined as spring (03/15-05/31), summer (06/01-08/31), and fall (09/01-12/31), pre-COVID-19 (2017-2019), or during COVID-19 (2020). We summarized the change in weekly median visits and interquartile range (IQR) by characteristics and compared between the two periods (e.g., spring pre-COVID-19 [3/15-05/31/2017-2019] versus spring COVID-19 [3/15-05/31/2020]) using median regression. RESULTS: There were 42,979 SUD visits (10,697 COVID-19; 32,282 pre-COVID-19) and 256 annual weekly median adolescent SUD visits [IQR 235, 280] pre-COVID-19 and 268 [IQR 245, 278] during COVID-19. The median number of weekly SUD visits increased by 14.3% during summer COVID-19 (median visits, [IQR]: 272 [268, 278]) compared to pre-COVID-19 (median visits: 237, IQR [216, 249]; p < .001) but did not significantly differ in spring (p = .091) or fall (p = .65) COVID-19. DISCUSSION: Our findings suggest increased problematic adolescent substance use during summer COVID-19. Efforts to increase the identification and treatment of adolescent SUDs remain critical.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Substance-Related Disorders , Adolescent , Child , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology
3.
The American Journal of Psychiatry ; 178(2):203-204, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1208454

ABSTRACT

The letter presents a study on the impact of COVID-19 on mental health of physician mothers. To quantify the mental health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on a predominantly U.S. cohort of physician mothers, authors surveyed the Physician Moms Group on Facebook from April 18 to April 29, 2020, after receiving approval from the institutional review board at Stanford University. The rates of anxiety among physician mothers in this study appear substantial;for context, in the general U.S. population in normal circumstances, about 19% of adults had any anxiety disorder in the past year. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

4.
Pediatrics ; 148(1)2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1183695

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Increased rates of firearm ownership, school closures, and a suspected decrease in supervision during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic place young children at increased risk of firearm injuries. We measured trends in firearm injuries in children and inflicted by children discharging a firearm during the pandemic and correlated these changes with a rise in firearm acquisition. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study with an interrupted time series analysis, we used multiyear data from the Gun Violence Archive. We compared trends in (1) firearm injuries in children younger than 12 years old and (2) firearm injuries inflicted by children younger than 12 years old during the pre-COVID-19 period (March to August in the years 2016-2019) and during the first 6 months of the COVID-19 pandemic (March 2020 to August 2020). Linear regression models were developed to evaluate the relationship between firearm injuries and new firearm acquisitions. RESULTS: There was an increased risk of (1) firearm injuries in young children (relative risk = 1.90; 95% confidence interval 1.58 to 2.29) and (2) firearm injuries inflicted by young children (relative risk = 1.43; 95% confidence interval 1.14 to 1.80) during the first 6 months of the COVID-19 pandemic as compared to the pre-COVID-19 study period. These increased incidents correlate with an increase in new firearm ownership (P < .03). CONCLUSIONS: There has been a surge in firearm injuries in young children and inflicted by young children during the first 6 months of the COVID-19 pandemic. There is an urgent and critical need for enactment of interventions aimed at preventing firearm injuries and deaths involving children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Firearms/statistics & numerical data , Wounds, Gunshot/epidemiology , Child , Correlation of Data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , United States/epidemiology
5.
J Womens Health (Larchmt) ; 30(4): 514-524, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147921

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has presented extreme challenges for health care workers. This study sought to characterize challenges faced by physician mothers, compare differences in challenges by home and work characteristics, and elicit specific needs and potential solutions. Methods: We conducted a mixed-methods online survey of the Physician Moms Group (PMG) and PMG COVID19 Subgroup on Facebook from April 18th to 29th, 2020. We collected structured data on personal and professional characteristics and qualitative data on home and work concerns. We analyzed qualitative data thematically and used bivariate analyses to evaluate variation in themes by frontline status and children's ages. Results: We included 1,806 participants in analysis and identified 10 key themes. The most frequently identified need/solution was for Community and Government Support (n = 545, 47.1%). When comparing frontline and nonfrontline physicians, those on the frontline more frequently raised concerns about Personal Health and Safety (67.8% vs. 48.4%, p < 0.001), Organizational Communication and Relationships (31.8% vs. 23.8%, p < 0.001), and Family Health and Safety (27.2 vs. 16.6, p < 0.001), while nonfrontline physicians more frequently addressed Patient Care and Safety (56.4% vs. 48.2%, p < 0.001) and Financial/Job Security (33.8% vs. 46.9%, p < 0.001). Participants with an elementary school-aged child more frequently raised concerns about Parenting/Homeschooling (44.0% vs. 31.1%, p < 0.001) and Work/Life Balance (28.4 vs. 13.7, p < 0.001), and participants with a preschool-aged child more frequently addressed Access to Childcare (24.0 vs. 7.7, p < 0.001) and Spouse/Partner Relationships (15.8 vs. 9.5, p < 0.001), when compared to those without children in these age groups. Conclusions: The physician workforce is not homogenous. Health care and government leaders need to understand these diverse challenges in order to meet physicians' professional and family needs during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mothers/psychology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Pandemics , Physicians, Women/psychology , Work-Life Balance , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
7.
J Pediatr ; 231: 157-161.e1, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1056954

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the demographics, clinical features, and test results of children referred from their primary provider for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) in the community setting. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cross-sectional study of children ≤22 years of age who were tested for SARS-CoV-2 at a community-based specimen collection site in Washington, DC, affiliated with a large children's hospital between March 21 and May 16, 2020. RESULTS: Of the 1445 patients tested at the specimen collection site for SARS-CoV-2 virus, 408 (28.2%) had a positive polymerase chain reaction test. The daily positivity rate increased over the study period, from 5.4% during the first week to a peak of 47.4% (Ptrend < .001). Patients with fever (aOR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3-2.3) or cough (aOR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1-1.9) and those with known contact with someone with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection (aOR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.0-2.4.) were more likely have a positive test, but these features were not highly discriminating. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of mildly symptomatic or well children and adolescents referred to a community drive-through/walk-up SARS-CoV-2 testing site because of risk of exposure or clinical illness, 1 in 4 patients had a positive test. Children and young adults represent a considerable burden of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Assessment of their role in transmission is essential to implementing appropriate control measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Community Health Services , Adolescent , COVID-19/complications , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , District of Columbia , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
9.
Pediatrics ; 146(4)2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-695748

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate racial and/or ethnic and socioeconomic differences in rates of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection among children. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study of children tested for SARS-CoV-2 at an exclusively pediatric drive-through and walk-up SARS-CoV-2 testing site from March 21, 2020, to April 28, 2020. We performed bivariable and multivariable logistic regression to measure the association of patient race and/or ethnicity and estimated median family income (based on census block group estimates) with (1) SARS-CoV-2 infection and (2) reported exposure to SARS-CoV-2. RESULTS: Of 1000 children tested for SARS-CoV-2 infection, 20.7% tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. In comparison with non-Hispanic white children (7.3%), minority children had higher rates of infection (non-Hispanic Black: 30.0%, adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-4.4]; Hispanic: 46.4%, aOR 6.3 [95% CI 3.3-11.9]). In comparison with children in the highest median family income quartile (8.7%), infection rates were higher among children in quartile 3 (23.7%; aOR 2.6 [95% CI 1.4-4.9]), quartile 2 (27.1%; aOR 2.3 [95% CI 1.2-4.3]), and quartile 1 (37.7%; aOR 2.4 [95% CI 1.3-4.6]). Rates of reported exposure to SARS-CoV-2 also differed by race and/or ethnicity and socioeconomic status. CONCLUSIONS: In this large cohort of children tested for SARS-CoV-2 through a community-based testing site, racial and/or ethnic minorities and socioeconomically disadvantaged children carry the highest burden of infection. Understanding and addressing the causes of these differences are needed to mitigate disparities and limit the spread of infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/ethnology , Epidemics , Pneumonia, Viral/ethnology , Race Factors/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , United States/epidemiology , /statistics & numerical data
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