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1.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 20(1):519, 2023.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-2166481

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has led us to take preventive measures, such as social isolation, to reduce the high transmissibility of the disease. This could have affected the mental health of various population groups and the development of resilience as a mitigator. A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted with 700 participants from eight cities. The dependent variables were depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The independent variable was resilience. Generalized logistic regressions were used to identify the associations between the variables. The population consisted mostly of university students (65.0%);the rest of the population was distributed among workers of public or private institutions, housewives, and others (35.0%). High prevalences of anxiety (72.7%), depression (64.1%), and PTSD (15.1%) were found, as well as a median (interquartile range) resilience score of 24 points was determined. Factors associated with a high prevalence of PTSD were having lost employment and having a family member who died from COVID-19. For depression, associated factors were severe food insecurity and hypersomnia. For anxiety, associated factors were were having a deceased family member with COVID-19 and mild food insecurity. Our results show that, during the pandemic, the general population had a higher prevalence of mental disorders. In addition, anxiety was the most prevalent of the dependent variables. Special attention should be paid to the factors influencing the development of mental disorders and mental health prevention and promotion programs should be established.

2.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1962, 2022 10 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089184

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Food insecurity has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, affecting an estimated 260 million people. However, little evidence is available on how pandemic-related characteristics influence food security in a high-altitude population. The objective of this study was to assess factors associated with food insecurity in high-altitude Peruvian cities during the second epidemic wave of COVID-19. METHODS: A retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted in eight Peruvian cities over 1,500 m above sea level. An online survey measuring food security, presence of anxiety & depressive symptoms, sleep quality, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), resilience, and sociodemographic characteristics was disseminated through social networks between December 2020 and February 2021. Generalized linear models were used to identify an association between the study variables. RESULTS: Of 700 participants, the median age was 23 years, and more than half were female (56.7%). The prevalence of food insecurity was 37.1%. Anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, and PTSD were present in 72.7%, 64.1%, and 15% of respondents, respectively. The prevalence of food insecurity was higher in people with fair (PR: 1.60, 95% CI: 1.23-2.07) and very bad perception of their health (PR: 4.06, 95% CI: 2.63-6.26), individuals seeking mental health support (PR: 1.42, 95% CI: 1.25-1.62), and in those who lost their job due to the pandemic (PR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.62-2.04). Having moderate (PR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.26-1.83) and moderate to severe depressive symptoms (PR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.11-2.27) also increased the prevalence of food insecurity. CONCLUSION: During the pandemic, the prevalence of food insecurity has increased in the Peruvian high-altitude population, revealing the need for preventive strategies. Identification of pandemic-related characteristics that influence food insecurity can guide interventions in at-risk individuals and reduce the long-term impact of this problem on overall health and quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Young Adult , Adult , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Prevalence , Peru/epidemiology , Cities , Retrospective Studies , Quality of Life , Altitude , Food Supply , Food Insecurity
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082300

ABSTRACT

Military personnel represent a frontline group exposed to multiple stressors. These factors have increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, predisposing to the development of suicidal risk (SR). Given the few studies conducted in this population, we evaluated the prevalence of SR and its associated factors during the health emergency. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted in person among 514 participants in Lambayeque, Peru in 2021. The outcome was SR, and the exposures were depression (PHQ-9), anxiety (GAD-7), PTSD (PCL-C), and other sociodemographic variables. The prevalence of SR was 14.0% (95% CI: 11.12-17.31%) and was significantly higher in people with a family history of mental health (PR: 2.16; 95% CI: 1.13-4.15) and in those with moderate clinical insomnia (PR: 2.21; 95% CI: 1.19-4.12). Military personnel with high resilience had a lower prevalence of SR (PR: 0.54, CI: 0.31-0.95). Anxiety was associated with a higher prevalence of SR (PR: 3.27; 95% CI: 1.76-6.10). Our findings show that at least 1 out of 10 military personnel are at risk of suicide. Special attention should be paid to the associated factors to develop interventions and reverse their consequences. These results may be useful in policy implementation and general statistics of SR in the local and regional context.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Suicide , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Military Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Peru/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
4.
Frontiers in public health ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2073113

ABSTRACT

Objectives Education has totally changed in the context of the pandemic. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the factors associated with the level of satisfaction with virtual education in Peruvian medical students during COVID-19. Methods Analytical and cross-sectional study, based on an online survey of students nationwide. We use previously validated instruments to measure the level of satisfaction and stress (EPP-10-c) of students with virtual education. For the associated factors, adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) were estimated using Poisson regression. Results Of the 1,878 students surveyed, the median age was 21 years, 57.8% (1,086) were women, 34.8% (654) had a high level of satisfaction with virtual education and 10.7% (202) presented high levels of stress. The factors associated with a low level of satisfaction were attending the fifth year of study, the partial and non-virtual adaptation of the university to virtual education, and a high level of stress. On the other hand, the factors associated with a high level of satisfaction were the education platform used and the study method used. Conclusion Seven out of 10 students presented a low level of satisfaction with virtual education, 1 out of 10 presented a high level of stress. The factors associated with the low level of satisfaction were attending the fifth year of study, the non-virtual and partial adaptation of the university to virtual education, and the high level of stress.

5.
Rev Colomb Psiquiatr ; 2022 Aug 09.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2049850

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Eating disorders (ED) are serious conditions that have diverse consequences, associated with high morbidity and mortality: Among the factors associated with their development are, being female, and stress, which increased during the pandemic, and was higher in medical students. Our objective was to identify the prevalence and factors associated with ED in medical students. METHODS: Cross-sectional study, conducted with an online questionnaire, between January 1 and 31, 2021, in 22 universities, using the Eating Disorder Scale (EAT-26) and the Family Communication Scale (FCS). Generalized logistic regressions were used to identify the association between variables. RESULTS: A total of 1224 participants were recruited, and the prevalence was 12.5%. Associated factors included a poor perception of health in 34.3%, having a family and/or social environment member with an eating disorder in 21.7%, and medium or low satisfaction with family communication in 57.3% and 34.9% respectively, in addition to the academic year, dieting, concern for body image and the perception of inadequate eating. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that, in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, 1-2 out of 10 Human Medicine students had an ED. The associated factors that influenced development of the condition included a fair or poor perception of health, the academic year completed, and medium or low satisfaction with family communication.

6.
Revista colombiana de psiquiatria ; 2022.
Article in Spanish | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1989921

ABSTRACT

Introducción: Los trastornos de la conducta alimentaria (TCA) son alteraciones graves que tienen diversas consecuencias asociadas con alta morbilidad y mortalidad. Entre sus factores se encuentran ser mujer y el estrés, que aumentó en el contexto de la pandemia y es mayor entre los estudiantes de Medicina. El objetivo es identificar la prevalencia y los factores del TCA en estudiantes de Medicina. Métodos: Estudio transversal, realizado con un cuestionario online, entre el 1 y el 31 de enero de 2021 en 22 universidades, utilizando los instrumentos de escala de trastornos alimentarios (EAT-26) y la escala de comunicación familiar (FCS). Se utilizaron regresiones logísticas generalizadas para identificar la asociación entre las variables. Resultados: Se incluyó a 1.224 participantes y la prevalencia fue del 12,5%. Los factores asociados fueron una regular percepción de la salud (34,3%), tener un entorno familiar y/o social con TCA (21,7%) y la satisfacción media (57,3%) y baja (34,9%) con la comunicación familiar, además del año académico, estar a dieta, la preocupación por la imagen corporal y la percepción de una alimentación inadecuada. Conclusiones: Nuestros resultados evidencian que, en el contexto de la pandemia por COVID-19, 1-2 de cada 10 estudiantes de Medicina Humana presentaron TCA. Entre los factores relacionados, se encontraron tener una percepción regular o mala de la salud, el año académico cursado y una satisfacción media y baja con la comunicación familiar.

7.
J Patient Saf ; 2022 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1948607

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the factors associated with the consumption of drugs without scientific evidence in patients with mild COVID-19 infection in Peru. METHODS: An analytical cross-sectional study was carried out including 372 adult patients with a history of mild COVID-19 disease. Factors associated with drug consumption were evaluated by Poisson regressions with robust variance adjustment using the bootstrapping resampling method. RESULTS: Seventy-two percent consumed some medication without scientific evidence, with antibiotics (71%) and ivermectin for human use (68%) being the most commonly used. Factors associated with the consumption of drugs to treat mild COVID-19 infection were thinking that the drugs are not effective (adjusted prevalence ratio, 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.74) and not being informed about the efficacy of the drugs (adjusted prevalence ratio, 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.65). CONCLUSIONS: Education of the population seems to be the main factor that increases the consumption of drugs without scientific evidence in the Peruvian population to treat mild COVID-19.

8.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 10(7)2022 Jun 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1911302

ABSTRACT

Studies in military personnel are scarce and have reported increased rates of medical consultations and insomnia. The COVID-19 pandemic has been associated with a number of factors that increase the prevalence of insomnia, which has established consequences in the military. However, reported data are from different settings. We aimed to identify the prevalence and factors associated with insomnia during the second COVID-19 epidemic wave in Lambayeque, Peru. A retrospective study in 566 participants was conducted face-to-face in November 2021. The dependent variable was insomnia, measured with the Insomnia Severity Index. The independent variables were socio-labor variables, physical activity, food insecurity, eating behavior disorder, fear of COVID-19, and resilience. The prevalence of insomnia was 23% (95% CI: 19.6-26.7%). In multivariate analysis, insomnia was associated with a personal history of mental health (PR: 1.71, 95% CI: 1.01-2.93), food insecurity (PR: 1.43, 95% CI: 1.05-1.95), fear of COVID-19 (PR: 2.57, 95% CI: 1.87-3.54), and high resilience (PR: 0.60, 95% CI: 0.42-0.86). Overall, the Peruvian military population presents a high prevalence of insomnia during the pandemic period. Special attention should be paid to factors that influence insomnia. Prevention and promotion programs should be established to reverse this negative trend in the military.

9.
PLoS One ; 17(5): e0267625, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1833661

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the factors associated with prevention practices against COVID-19 in the Peruvian population according to rural vs. urban locations. METHODS: Analytical cross-sectional study, secondary analysis based on a previously collected database. A sample of individuals over 18 years of age, residing in Peru and with no history of COVID-19was evaluated. Factors associated with prevention practices were evaluated using Poisson regressions with variance adjustment by region cluster and stratified by rurality. RESULTS: Of 3231 participants included, 2741 (84.8%) were from urban areas and 490 (15.2%) from rural areas. The frequency of good prevention practices against COVID-19 was 27.8% in our total sample. In urban areas the frequency of good prevention practices was 28.8% and in rural areas it was 22.5%. Factors associated with prevention practices against COVID-19 in both urban and rural areas were male sex (urban: aPR 0.64, 95%CI 0.55-0.75; rural: aPR 0.66, 95%CI 0.54-0.80) and self-considering adequately carrying out prevention practices (urban: aPR 2.48, 95%CI 2.13-2.89; rural: aPR 2.70, 95%CI 2.27-3.19). CONCLUSION: The frequency of good prevention practices against COVID-19 was less than 30% in both urban and rural areas. There are differences in the factors associated with good preventive practice against COVID-19. Only sex and considering that preventive measures were adequately carried out were associated with good prevention practices in both areas. In view of this, prevention measures should be promoted taking into account cultural principles and considering geographical location in the face of present and future outbreaks or pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Peru/epidemiology , Rural Population , Urban Population
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