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1.
J Perinat Med ; 50(7): 1001-1004, 2022 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1833737

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: A greater proportion of non-pregnant smokers attempted to stop smoking during compared to before the COVID-19 pandemic. The objective of this study was to determine if a greater proportion of pregnant women also attempted to stop smoking during the pandemic rather than before. METHODS: The use of antenatal smoking cessation services and nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) in pregnant women was audited before (2019-2020) and during the COVID pandemic (2020-2021). Anonymised data from January 2019 to March 2021 were analysed from the Lambeth and Southwark smoking cessation service. RESULTS: A total of 252 pregnant women who smoked were referred to their local antenatal smoking cessation service, of which 90 (35.7%) (median age: 31 years [19-52 years]) chose to attend smoking cessation clinics. The COVID-19 pandemic was not associated with an increase in the number of women attending smoking cessation clinics, (2020-2021 n=46 [40.8%] of 110); compared to (2019-2020 n=44 [30.9%] of 142 referred pregnant women pre-pandemic) p=0.061. Eighty-two women utilised NRT to help them stop smoking and the frequency of NRT use did not change during the pandemic (2019-2020 n=39, 2020-2021 n=43; p=0.420). No significant difference in smoking cessation rates between the two periods was observed at either the four-week (p=0.285) or twelve-week follow-up (p=0.829). CONCLUSIONS: Smoking cessation rates in pregnant women and the demand for antenatal smoking cessation services was unchanged during compared to before the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications , Smoking Cessation , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Smoking/adverse effects , Smoking/epidemiology , Smoking/therapy , Tobacco Use Cessation Devices
2.
Children (Basel) ; 8(10)2021 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480605

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to determine whether the introduction of 24 h cover by resident consultants in a tertiary neonatal unit affected mortality and other clinical outcomes. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study in a tertiary medical and surgical neonatal unit between 2010-2020 of all liveborn infants admitted to the neonatal unit. Out of hours cover was rearranged in 2014 to ensure 24 h presence of a senior trained neonatologist (resident consultant). RESULTS: In the study period, 4778 infants were included: 2613 in the pre-resident period and 2165 in the resident period. The median (IQR) time to first consultation by a senior member of staff was significantly longer in the pre-resident period [1.5 (0.6-4.3) h] compared to the resident period [0.5 (0.3-1.5) h, p < 0.001]. Overall, mortality was similar in the pre-resident and the resident periods (3.2% versus 2.3%, p = 0.077), but the mortality of infants born at night was significantly higher in the pre-resident (4.5%) compared to the resident period (2.5%, p = 0.016). The resident period was independently associated with an increased survival to discharge (adjusted p < 0.001, odds ratio: 2.0) after adjusting for gestational age, admission temperature and duration of ventilation. CONCLUSIONS: Following introduction of a resident consultant model the mortality and time to consultation after admission decreased.

3.
Experimental & Therapeutic Medicine ; 20(6):N.PAG-N.PAG, 2020.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-941798
4.
Exp Ther Med ; 20(6): 302, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940261

ABSTRACT

The Institute of Paediatric Virology, founded on October 2019 on the island of Euboea in Greece, introduces medical students, paediatric and neonatal trainees, postgraduate students, virologists, paediatric and allied health professionals to the bold, new, scientific field of paediatric virology. The institute is committed to medical education and is the sequel of the Paediatric Virology Study Group (PVSG), which was formed in 2007 in the United Kingdom by a group of young paediatric trainees and junior researchers. The main mission of the institute is to provide an educational e-platform on neonatal and paediatric viral infections, to facilitate scientific discussion between virologists and paediatric health professionals and to develop an international network aiming to the promotion of children's health by the prevention and treatment of viral infectious diseases. The foundation of the institute is dedicated to three children from a small fishing village at the south of the island of Euboea in Greece, who survived the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic.

5.
Exp Ther Med ; 20(6): 290, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940260

ABSTRACT

Paediatric virology is a bold, new scientific field, where paediatrics focuses on the newly acquired knowledge from clinical virology, enriched with current advances in epidemiology, molecular medicine, evidence-based medicine, clinical governance, quality improvement, pharmacology and immunology. Although there are several methods with which to obtain training in paediatric viral infections in the UK, paediatric virology does not currently exist as a specific subspecialty. The aim of the present article was to present the existing educational platforms and training options in paediatric virology in the UK available to trainees wanting to pursue a clinical and/or academic career in paediatric virology.

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