Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 108
Filter
1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(11)2022 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1884124

ABSTRACT

The rapid spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has led to high levels of fear worldwide. Given that fear is an important factor in causing psychological distress and facilitating preventive behaviors, assessing the fear of COVID-19 is important. The seven-item Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S) is a widely used psychometric instrument to assess this fear. However, the factor structure of the FCV-19S remains unclear according to the current evidence. Therefore, the present study used a network analysis to provide further empirical evidence for the factor structure of FCV-19S. A total of 24,429 participants from Iran (n = 10,843), Bangladesh (n = 9906), and Norway (n = 3680) completed the FCV-19S in their local language. A network analysis (via regularized partial correlation networks) was applied to investigate the seven FCV-19S items. Moreover, relationships between the FCV-19S items were compared across gender (males vs. females), age groups (18-30 years, 31-50 years, and >50 years), and countries (Iran, Bangladesh, and Norway). A two-factor structure pattern was observed (three items concerning physical factors, including clammy hands, insomnia, and heart palpitations; four items concerning psychosocial factors, including being afraid, uncomfortable, afraid of dying, and anxious about COVID-19 news). Moreover, this pattern was found to be the same among men and women, across age groups and countries. The network analysis used in the present study verified the two-factor structure for the FCV-19S. Future studies may consider using the two-factor structure of FCV-19S to assess the fear of COVID-19 during the COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Bangladesh/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Cultural Comparison , Fear/psychology , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Young Adult
2.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; : 2079344, 2022 Jun 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1882944

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly impacted lives worldwide and has led to global vaccination against COVID-19. However, there are concerns about the adverse effects of such vaccines on individuals' health. Therefore, it is important to investigate the association between vaccination and holistic health outcome (i.e., quality of life [QoL]). The present study analyzed data from the Taiwan Social Change Survey (TSCS), a survey conducted utilizing stratified random sampling. More specifically, data (N = 1425; 47.44% males; mean age = 50.58 y) on their vaccinations (including COVID-19 and flu vaccines) and QoL (using the Short-Form 12) were used. Participants were separated into two age subgroups for analyses (those aged below 50 y, and those 50 y or above). For participants aged below 50 y, those who received COVID-19 vaccine and those who received both COVID-19 and flu vaccines had significantly better physical QoL than those who did not receive any vaccination. Mental QoL was not significantly associated with vaccinations for participants aged below 50 y. Moreover, neither mental nor physical QoL was significantly associated with vaccinations for those aged 50 y or above. The present study showed that not having COVID-19 and flu vaccinations is associated with poor QoL. This finding should be disseminated to the public to help aid vaccination promotion.

3.
Front Psychol ; 13: 837315, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834536

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 outbreak and related lockdowns brought substantial changes in people's lives and led to concerns about possible increases of addictive behaviors at the initial stages of the pandemic. To examine these concerns, the aim of the present study was to assess longitudinal changes in addictive and problematic behaviors (i.e., problematic social media use, Internet gaming disorder, gambling disorder, problematic pornography use, and compulsive sexual behavior disorder) over time during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: Three waves of data collection took place in different stages of the COVID-19 outbreak in Hungary in a general population, from the first wave of lockdowns to the second and third waves of restrictions (May, 2020; N T1 = 1747; June-August, 2020; N T2 = 656; January, 2021; N T3 = 411). Latent growth curve models were calculated to assess the potential changes in addictive and problematic behaviors over time. Results: Latent growth curve models showed that the sample varied in their initial scores, but there were no significant changes over time in any of the examined behaviors, except for compulsive sexual behavior disorder, which demonstrated a small but significant increase (i.e., positive and significant slope factor). However, the rate of this change was negligible. Overall, there were no noteworthy changes over time regarding any of the examined addictive and problematic behaviors. Conclusion: Contrary to initial concerns, no substantial changes over time were observed regarding the examined addictive behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic and related lockdowns. These findings indicate that those who had no previous problem with these addictive behaviors, might have not developed a problem, and those who had problem with either of the behaviors previously, might have not experienced a significant increase in their symptoms.

5.
Curr Psychol ; : 1-17, 2022 Jan 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1827089

ABSTRACT

Utilizing a large-scale cross-sectional survey, the present study tested the advanced psychometric properties of Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S) in specific populations (i.e., primary and middle schoolteachers, and their students). The present study also examined the association between perceived fear of COVID-19 and psychological distress among home-room teachers (i.e., teachers who teach all their students in one classroom all day) and their students. The results among participants (11,134 teachers and 4,335 students) indicated good internal reliability of FCV-19S and excellent factorial validity with a two-factor structure utilizing these specific populations. Furthermore, the multilevel analysis showed that home-room teachers' psychological distress, but not fear of COVID-19, was positively associated with their students. In sum, the FCV-19S is a useful tool to assess the fear of COVID-19 on potentially vulnerable populations (i.e., primary/middle schoolteachers and their students). Future studies are encouraged to use the present study's findings to investigate possible underlying mechanisms for developing effective coping strategies and interventions. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s12144-021-02471-3.

6.
Front Psychiatry ; 13: 842466, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1822406

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has negatively impacted psychosocial well-being and mental health of students across the world. Although students are vulnerable to depression and suicidal ideation, few studies have been conducted in Uganda. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of depression and suicidal ideation, and associated factors among undergraduate university students in Uganda. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among undergraduates [N = 540; 363 males; mean age = 23.3 (± 2.64) years] recruited from four universities using an online questionnaire that explored sociodemographic factors, depression, and other associated factors. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) was used to assess depression, and Item 9 was used to assess suicidal ideation in the past 2 weeks. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the factors associated with depression and suicidal ideation. Results: The prevalence of moderate to severe depression was 20% (n = 108) (cut-off: 10/27 based on the PHQ-9), and the prevalence of past-2-week suicidal ideation was 13.89% (n = 75) (cut-off: 1/3 based on the PHQ-9 Item 9). About half of the individuals who screened positive for depression had suicidal ideation. Factors associated with depression were: having relationship issues [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.13-2.81, p = 0.012], and having a history of sexual abuse (aOR = 2.06, 95% CI = 1.10-3.84, p = 0.023). Factors associated with reducing the risk of depression were: satisfaction with current academic performance (aOR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.32-0.79, p = 0.003), and being in the fifth year of academic study (aOR = 0.16, 95% CI = 0.03-0.73, p = 0.018). Factors associated with suicidal ideation were: smoking cigarettes and/or marijuana (aOR = 4.83, 95% CI = 1.10-21.12, p = 0.037), and having financial tuition constraints (aOR = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.08-3.16, p = 0.024), However, satisfaction with current academic performance reduced the likelihood of suicidal ideation (aOR = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.23-0.70, p = 0.001). Conclusion: Approximately one-fifth of undergraduate university students were moderately to severely depressed, especially those who had relationship issues and those with a history of sexual abuse. Suicidal ideation was common among smokers and those having financial tuition constraints. Therefore, it is recommended that the university authorities implement measures to provide psychological support for the students with problems concerning financial tuition constraints, relationships, and sexual abuse. Also, all students with depression should be screened for suicidality.

7.
Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw ; 25(5): 270-277, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820726

ABSTRACT

Little is known about the psychological consequences of the recently increased utilization of videoconferencing, which has enabled life to proceed as close to normal as possible during the COVID-19 pandemic. To understand the psychological consequences of this recent global lifestyle change in different populations, the psychometric validation of the Zoom Exhaustion and Fatigue Scale (ZEFS) and the relationship of this construct with academic well-being, mental well-being, and life satisfaction are presented. In a sample of 470 Turkish university students (57 percent female, Mage = 20.26 ± 2.18, ranging between 18 and 33 years), first-order and second-order confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the construct validity of the scale, and the item response theory results yielded appropriate item difficulty and discrimination. ZEFS scores were significantly and positively associated with anxiety, depression, and stress, and negatively associated with life satisfaction and academic well-being, supporting the scale's concurrent validity. Incremental validity was shown with mediational models demonstrating significant and separate indirect effects of Zoom exhaustion and fatigue on life satisfaction and academic well-being, both mediated by psychological distress. The results suggest ZEFS to be a valid and reliable tool to evaluate the psychological consequences of videoconferencing, which has globally increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, in non-Western samples. By showing the relationships of Zoom exhaustion and fatigue with psychological distress, life satisfaction, and academic well-being, the present study highlights potential avenues to be addressed to protect the mental well-being of all individuals who have integrated videoconferencing as part of their daily lives.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Fatigue , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , Stress, Psychological , Young Adult
8.
BMC Geriatr ; 22(1): 371, 2022 04 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1817186

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Suicidal ideation is a major risk factor for suicide and can negatively affect self-care and health behaviors among the older adults. There are limited data on the prevalence and risk factors of suicidal ideation among the older population during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of the present study was to examine the prevalence and risk factors of suicidal ideations among Iranian older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A total of 803 older community adults in Shiraz (Southwestern Iran) were surveyed to determine potential factors influencing suicidal ideation, including demographic factors, physical health status, access to healthcare, current depression status, fear of COVID-19, perceived social support, and social engagement. Data were collected utilizing face-to-face interviews between November and December 2020. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent variables associated with suicidal ideations. RESULTS: Among the 803 participants, 69 reported suicidal ideations (8.6%). Individuals with suicidal ideations were more likely to have greater fear of COVID-19. However, based on the results of multivariate logistic regression analysis, current depression (OR: 2.07, CI 95%: 1.18-3.65), not being married (OR: 1.82, CI 95%: 1.06-3.13), inability to pay for medical bills (OR: 2.16, CI 95%: 1.23-3.79), low perceived social support (OR: 2.03, CI95%: 1.11-3.71), and having limited social network (OR:1.77, CI 95%: 1.02-3.10) appeared to be more powerful influencing factors. CONCLUSION: Suicidal ideation appears to be relatively common among Iranian older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. A lack of longitudinal data makes it difficult to establish an association between suicidal ideations and the COVID-19 pandemic. Systematic monitoring of suicidal ideation is recommended among high-risk groups, particularly the older population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicidal Ideation , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Pandemics , Social Support
9.
Ann Med Surg (Lond) ; 78: 103641, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1797201

ABSTRACT

Background: Gaming addiction has become a topic of increasing research interest worldwide but little research has been carried out in Pakistan. Aims: The present study assessed the prevalence of gaming addiction among a Pakistani sample of adults in the general population. It also explored the effects of online gaming addiction upon sleep quality. Method: A cross-sectional survey was carried out during a national lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Pakistan. Using a convenience sampling technique, an online survey comprising demographic information, the Game Addiction Scale (GAS), and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was completed by 618 participants (67.5% male) aged 18-56 years (M = 24.53 years, SD = ±5.016). Results: Out of 618 participants, 57.0% (n=352) played online games. Among gamers, 12.5% (n = 44) were classed as addicted to the gaming based on GAS scores. Compared to those not addicted to gaming, participants with gaming addiction had significantly poorer subjective sleep quality, higher sleep disturbance, lesser sleep duration, and higher daytime dysfunction. Gaming addiction was also more prevalent among males compared to females. Conclusion: Gaming addiction among the Pakistani general population is significantly associated with poor sleep quality. This problem needs to be addressed at both individual and societal levels to avoid adverse long-term health impacts.

10.
Frontiers in public health ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1787515

ABSTRACT

Background Physical activity (PA) is important for health. However, there is little evidence on how weight stigma, time spent on sedentary activities (including smartphone, social media, online learning), time spent on outdoor activity, and nomophobia associate with PA among Chinese individuals with consideration of gender. The present study examined the aforementioned associations in the COVID-19 pandemic era. Methods University students (N = 3,135;1,798 females, 1,337 males) with a mean age of 19.65 years (SD = 2.38) years completed an online survey from November to December, 2021. The online survey assessed weight stigma (using the Perceived Weight Stigma Scale and Weight Bias Internalization Scale), PA (using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire Short Form), time spent on different activities (using self-designed items for time on smartphone, outdoor activity, social media, and online learning), and nomophobia (using the Nomophobia Questionnaire). Parallel mediation models were constructed (dependent variable: PA;mediators: perceived weight stigma, weight-related self-stigma, time spent on smartphone, time spent on outdoor activity, time spent on social media, and time spent online learning;independent variable: nomophobia) and evaluated using Hayes' Process Macro Model 4 (IBM SPSS 20.0). Results Weight-related self-stigma (β = −0.06;p = 0.03), time spent on outdoor activity (β = 0.21;p < 0.001), time spent on social media (β = 0.07;p = 0.02), time spent on online learning (β = 0.06;p = 0.03), and nomophobia (β = −0.07;p = 0.01) were all significant factors explaining the PA among female participants. Perceived weight stigma (β = −0.07;p = 0.01), time spent on outdoor activity (β = 0.27;p < 0.001), and time spent on online learning (β = 0.10;p = 0.002) were all significant factors explaining PA among male participants. Conclusion Chinese healthcare providers should design programs on weight stigma reduction and outdoor activity improvement to enhance PA among university students.

11.
BJPsych Open ; 8(2): e73, 2022 Mar 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753143

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severity of COVID-19 remains high worldwide. Therefore, millions of individuals are likely to suffer from fear of COVID-19 and related mental health factors. AIMS: The present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to synthesize empirical evidence to understand fear of COVID-19 and its associations with mental health-related problems during this pandemic period. METHOD: Relevant studies were searched for on five databases (Scopus, ProQuest, EMBASE, PubMed Central, and ISI Web of Knowledge), using relevant terms (COVID-19-related fear, anxiety, depression, mental health-related factors, mental well-being and sleep problems). All studies were included for analyses irrespective of their methodological quality, and the impact of quality on pooled effect size was examined by subgroup analysis. RESULTS: The meta-analysis pooled data from 91 studies comprising 88 320 participants (mean age 38.88 years; 60.66% females) from 36 countries. The pooled estimated mean of fear of COVID-19 was 13.11 (out of 35), using the Fear of COVID-19 Scale. The associations between fear of COVID-19 and mental health-related factors were mostly moderate (Fisher's z = 0.56 for mental health-related factors; 0.54 for anxiety; 0.42 for stress; 0.40 for depression; 0.29 for sleep problems and -0.24 for mental well-being). Methodological quality did not affect these associations. CONCLUSIONS: Fear of COVID-19 has associations with various mental health-related factors. Therefore, programmes for reducing fear of COVID-19 and improving mental health are needed.

12.
Psychology research and behavior management ; 15:581-596, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1743977

ABSTRACT

Background The COVID-19 pandemic is still ongoing and is not yet under control. Evidence regarding the impacts of COVID-19 on psychological distress has been widely reported worldwide, and one of the primary concerns regarding psychological distress is fear (ie, fear of COVID-19). Therefore, having a robust instrument for assessing fear of COVID-19 is important. The present systematic review aimed to synthesize the psychometric evidence evaluated using item response theory (IRT) on the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S). Methods Utilizing the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, four academic databases (Scopus, PubMed Central, ProQuest, and ISI Web of Knowledge) were used to search target papers. Keywords used for search were “Fear of COVID-19 Scale” and its abbreviation (ie, “FCV-19S”) and IRT-related terms. The COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist was then applied to evaluate the methodological quality of the reviewed papers. Moreover, psychometric properties using IRT methods were synthesized using a qualitative method. Results The initial search resulted in 552 papers (73 duplicates) and 479 were screened based on their titles and s. Finally, 16 papers were included for review regarding their methodological quality (via COSMIN) to synthesize the psychometric evidence for FCV-19S. The 16 papers included 21 countries with 16 language versions of FCV-19S. Conclusion All the psychometric evidence indicated that the seven items in the FCV-19S fit with the concept of fear. The FCV-19S is a strong and valid instrument for assessing fear across different languages. The seven items in the FCV-19S appear to be unidimensional in assessing fear, which indicates that all items are necessary in the FCV-19S.

13.
Risk management and healthcare policy ; 15:435-445, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1743910

ABSTRACT

Purpose The percentage of individuals who were fully vaccinated against COVID-19 was 53% worldwide, 62% in Asia, and 11% in Africa at the time of writing (February 9, 2022). In addition to administrative issues, vaccine hesitancy is an important factor contributing to the relatively low rate of vaccination. The Motors of COVID-19 Vaccination Acceptance Scale (MoVac-COVID19S) was developed to assess COVID-19 vaccination acceptance levels. However, it has only been tested among Taiwanese, mainland Chinese, and Ghanaian populations (Chen et al, 2021;Fan et al, 2021;Yeh et al, 2021). Therefore, the present study examined the construct validity and measurement invariance of the MoVac-COVID19S among individuals from five countries (ie, Taiwan, mainland China, India, Ghana, and Afghanistan). Participants and Methods A cross-sectional survey study recruited 6053 participants across five countries who completed the survey between January and March 2021. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) fit indices were used to examine factor structure and measurement invariance across the five countries. Results The fit indices of the CFA were relatively good across the countries except for the root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA). Moreover, the four-factor structure (either nine or 12 items) had a better fit than the one-factor structure. However, the four-factor model using nine MoVac-COVID19S items was the only model that had measurement invariance support for both factor loadings and item intercepts across the five countries. Conclusion The present study confirmed that the MoVac-COVID19S has acceptable psychometric properties and can be used to assess an individual’s willingness to get COVID-19 vaccination.

14.
Curr Psychol ; : 1-16, 2022 Mar 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1734062

ABSTRACT

Exercise addiction (EA) has been described as a condition of psychological dysfunction characterized by excessive and obsessive exercise patterns, show withdrawal symptoms when unable to exercise, and experience numerous conflicts and other negative consequences in their social and professional lives, due to the extremely high volumes of exercise. The main objective of the present study was to assess the risk of exercise addiction among a Saudi Arabian sample of regular exercisers and to investigate possible associations between their inability to exercise during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown (due to the closure of public gyms, swimming pools, and health clubs) and depression, anxiety, and loneliness. A total of 388 regular-exercising Saudis participated in an online cross-sectional survey over three months (December to February 2021). The study sample comprised 89.9% (males) and 10.1% (females), with a mean age of 28.59 years (SD ± 6.69). A 36-item online self-report survey was used for data collection. The prevalence of being at risk of exercise addiction among participants of the present study was 13.1%. Positive significant associations were noted between risk of exercise addiction and depression (r = .41; p < .01), risk of exercise addiction and anxiety (r = .20; p < .01), and risk of exercise addiction and loneliness (r = .17; p < .01). The findings of the present study suggest that those individuals at risk of exercise addiction might also be at an elevated risk of developing negative psychological impact owing to the disruption of the amount of exercise engaged in due to COVID-19 pandemic-related restrictions and therefore these high-risk individuals should receive appropriate psychological support to help them overcome the negative impact of the ongoing pandemic. Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s12144-022-02892-8.

15.
Mindfulness (N Y) ; 13(2): 385-397, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1682035

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Empirical research investigating self-compassion is a rapidly developing field, and it is potentially crucial in early adolescence. The primary aim of the present study was to psychometrically evaluate the Persian translation of the Self-Compassion Scale Youth version (SCS-Y) and evaluate its factor structure among young adolescents. The second aim was to explore the buffering effect of self-compassion against the negative effect of difficulties in emotion regulation on COVID-19-related anxiety. Methods: A sample of young students (n = 532; mean age 13.57 years) completed an online survey, which included the SCS-Y, Patient Health Questionnaire, Difficulties In Emotion Regulation Scale, Coronavirus Anxiety Scale, Youth Life Orientation Test, Brief Resilience Scale, and Brief 10-Item Big Five Inventory. First-order (six-factor) confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and bi-factor exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) analysis were used to evaluate the factor structure of the SCS-Y. Results: Results showed that the SCS-Y had very good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficient: 0.88; McDonald's omega coefficient: 0.90), composite reliability (0.87), and adequate test-retest reliability after 4 weeks (0.60). The first-order (six-factor) CFA and bi-factor ESEM analysis demonstrated the SCS-Y had excellent dimensionality. Further analysis found negative associations between self-compassion with both depression and neuroticism, and positive associations between self-compassion with both resilience and optimism. Moreover, self-compassion moderated the association between emotion dysregulation and anxiety generated by the COVID-19. Overall, the findings indicated that the SCS-Y had acceptable criterion-related validity, convergent validity, and discriminant validity. Conclusions: The findings provide evidence that the SCS-Y is a reliable and valid instrument for assessing the six factors of self-compassion among younger adolescents. Based on the study's findings, self-compassion appears to be a protective factor against mental health problems during the COVID-19 pandemic for younger adolescents.

16.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(1)2022 Jan 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1624926

ABSTRACT

Vaccination is the most effective way to control the COVID-19 pandemic, but vaccination hesitancy threatens this effort worldwide. Consequently, there is a need to understand what influences individuals' intention to get a COVID-19 vaccine. Restriction of information gathering on societal developments to social media may influence attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination through exposure to disinformation and imbalanced arguments. The present study examined the association between problematic social media use and intention to get the COVID-19 vaccine, taking into account the mediating roles of cyberchondria, fear of COVID-19, and COVID-19 risk perception. In a cross-sectional survey study, a total of 10,843 residents of Qazvin City, Iran completed measures on problematic social media use, fear of COVID-19, cyberchondria, COVID-19 risk perception, and intention to get a COVID-19 vaccine. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). The results showed that there was no direct association between problematic social media use and intention to get a COVID-19 vaccine. Nonetheless, cyberchondria, fear of COVID-19, and COVID-19 risk perception (each or serially) mediated associations between problematic social media use and intention to get a COVID-19 vaccine. These results add to the understanding of the role of problematic social media use in COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy, i.e., it is not the quantity of social media use per se that matters. This knowledge of the mediating roles of cyberchondria, fear of COVID-19, and COVID-19 risk perception can be used by public health experts and policymakers when planning educational interventions and other initiatives in COVID-19 vaccination programs.

18.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 10(1)2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613733

ABSTRACT

The novel 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is still not under control globally. The pandemic has caused mental health issues among many different cohorts and suicidal ideation in relation to COVID-19 has been reported in a number of recent studies. Therefore, the present study proposed a model to explain the associations between generalized trust, fear of COVID-19, insomnia, and suicidal ideation during the COVID-19 pandemic among a large-scale Iranian sample. Utilizing cluster sampling with multistage stratification, residents from Qazvin province in Iran were invited to participate in the present study. Adults aged over 18 years (n = 10,843; 6751 [62.3%] females) completed 'paper-and-pencil' questionnaires with the assistance of a trained research assistant. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was applied to understand the associations between generalized trust, fear of COVID-19, insomnia, and suicidal ideation. Slightly over one-fifth of the participants (n = 2252; 20.8%) reported suicidal ideation. Moreover, the SEM results indicated that generalized trust was indirectly associated with suicidal ideation via fear of COVID-19 and insomnia. Furthermore, generalized trust was not directly associated with suicidal ideation. The proposed model was invariant across gender groups, age groups, and participants residing in different areas (i.e., urban vs. rural). Generalized trust might reduce individuals' suicidal ideation during the COVID-19 pandemic period via reduced levels of fear of COVID-19 and insomnia. Healthcare providers and policymakers may want to assist individuals in developing their generalized trust, reducing fear of COVID-19, and improving insomnia problems to avoid possible suicidal behaviors.

19.
Mindfulness ; : 1-13, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1610277

ABSTRACT

Objectives Empirical research investigating self-compassion is a rapidly developing field, and it is potentially crucial in early adolescence. The primary aim of the present study was to psychometrically evaluate the Persian translation of the Self-Compassion Scale Youth version (SCS-Y) and evaluate its factor structure among young adolescents. The second aim was to explore the buffering effect of self-compassion against the negative effect of difficulties in emotion regulation on COVID-19-related anxiety. Methods A sample of young students (n = 532;mean age 13.57 years) completed an online survey, which included the SCS-Y, Patient Health Questionnaire, Difficulties In Emotion Regulation Scale, Coronavirus Anxiety Scale, Youth Life Orientation Test, Brief Resilience Scale, and Brief 10-Item Big Five Inventory. First-order (six-factor) confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and bi-factor exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) analysis were used to evaluate the factor structure of the SCS-Y. Results Results showed that the SCS-Y had very good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient: 0.88;McDonald’s omega coefficient: 0.90), composite reliability (0.87), and adequate test–retest reliability after 4 weeks (0.60). The first-order (six-factor) CFA and bi-factor ESEM analysis demonstrated the SCS-Y had excellent dimensionality. Further analysis found negative associations between self-compassion with both depression and neuroticism, and positive associations between self-compassion with both resilience and optimism. Moreover, self-compassion moderated the association between emotion dysregulation and anxiety generated by the COVID-19. Overall, the findings indicated that the SCS-Y had acceptable criterion-related validity, convergent validity, and discriminant validity. Conclusions The findings provide evidence that the SCS-Y is a reliable and valid instrument for assessing the six factors of self-compassion among younger adolescents. Based on the study’s findings, self-compassion appears to be a protective factor against mental health problems during the COVID-19 pandemic for younger adolescents.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL