Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-311567

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study is to quantify the hospital burden of COVID-19 during the first wave and how it changed over calendar time;to interpret the results in light of the emergency measures introduced to manage the strain on secondary healthcare. Methods: : This is a cohort study of hospitalised confirmed cases of COVID-19 admitted from February-June 2020 and followed up till 17th July 2020, analysed using a mixture multi-state model. All hospital patients with confirmed COVID-19 disease in Regione Lombardia were involved, admitted from February-June 2020, with non-missing hospital of admission and non-missing admission date. Results: : The cohort consists of 40,550 patients hospitalised during the first wave. These patients had a median age of 69 (interquartile range 56-80) and were more likely to be men (60%) than women (40%). The hospital-fatality risk, averaged over all pathways through hospital, was 27.5% (95% CI 27.1-28.0%);and steadily decreased from 34.6% (32.5-36.6%) in February to 7.6% (6.3-10.6%) in June. Among surviving patients, median length of stay in hospital was 11.8 (11.6-12.3) days, compared to 8.1 (7.8-8.5) days in non-survivors. Averaged over final outcomes, median length of stay in hospital decreased from 21.4 (20.5-22.8) days in February to 5.2 (4.7-5.8) days in June. Conclusions: : The hospital burden, in terms of both risks of poor outcomes and lengths of stay in hospital, has been demonstrated to have decreased over the months of the first wave, perhaps reflecting improved treatment and management of COVID-19 cases, as well as reduced burden as the first wave waned. The quantified burden allows for planning of hospital beds needed for current and future waves of SARS-CoV-2.

3.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1612, 2021 09 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496155

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to quantify the hospital burden of COVID-19 during the first wave and how it changed over calendar time; to interpret the results in light of the emergency measures introduced to manage the strain on secondary healthcare. METHODS: This is a cohort study of hospitalised confirmed cases of COVID-19 admitted from February-June 2020 and followed up till 17th July 2020, analysed using a mixture multi-state model. All hospital patients with confirmed COVID-19 disease in Regione Lombardia were involved, admitted from February-June 2020, with non-missing hospital of admission and non-missing admission date. RESULTS: The cohort consists of 40,550 patients hospitalised during the first wave. These patients had a median age of 69 (interquartile range 56-80) and were more likely to be men (60%) than women (40%). The hospital-fatality risk, averaged over all pathways through hospital, was 27.5% (95% CI 27.1-28.0%); and steadily decreased from 34.6% (32.5-36.6%) in February to 7.6% (6.3-10.6%) in June. Among surviving patients, median length of stay in hospital was 11.8 (11.6-12.3) days, compared to 8.1 (7.8-8.5) days in non-survivors. Averaged over final outcomes, median length of stay in hospital decreased from 21.4 (20.5-22.8) days in February to 5.2 (4.7-5.8) days in June. CONCLUSIONS: The hospital burden, in terms of both risks of poor outcomes and lengths of stay in hospital, has been demonstrated to have decreased over the months of the first wave, perhaps reflecting improved treatment and management of COVID-19 cases, as well as reduced burden as the first wave waned. The quantified burden allows for planning of hospital beds needed for current and future waves of SARS-CoV-2 i.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(11)2021 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256528

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, more than ever, optimal influenza vaccination coverage among healthcare workers (HCWs) is crucial to avoid absenteeism and disruption of health services, as well as in-hospital influenza outbreaks. The aim of this study is to analyze the 2020 influenza vaccination campaign, comparing it with the previous year's in a research and teaching hospital in Northern Italy. METHODS: adopting an approach based on combined strategies, three interventions were deployed: a promotional and educational campaign, vaccination delivery through both ad hoc and on-site ambulatories, and a gaming strategy. Personal data and professional categories were collected and analyzed using univariate logistic regression. Vaccinated HCWs were asked to fill in a questionnaire to describe their reasons for vaccination adherence. RESULTS: the vaccination coverage rate (VCR) was 43.1%, compared to 21.5% in 2019. The highest increase was registered among administrative staff (308.3%), while physicians represent the most vaccinated category (n = 600). Moreover, residents (prevalence ratio (PR): 1.12; 95% CI 1.04-1.20), as well as intensive care (PR: 1.44; 95% CI: 1.24-1.69) and newborn workers (PR: 1.41; 95% CI: 1.20-1.65) were, respectively, the categories most frequently vaccinated for the first time. CONCLUSION: the significant increase in vaccination coverage rate confirms the suitability of the combined strategy of delivering the flu vaccination campaign and represents a first step towards reaching WHO recommended vaccination rates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Attitude of Health Personnel , Health Personnel , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Immunization Programs , Infant, Newborn , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL