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1.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 23(6)2021 Dec 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551702

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the demographic and clinical profiles of patients admitted to the psychiatry ward during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and compare with profiles of patients admitted 1 year before the onset of the pandemic (ie, before the lockdown announcement in India). An additional objective was to evaluate the incidence of COVID-19 infection in the psychiatry inpatient unit and discuss the measures taken to run the unit during the pandemic, including the measures taken if any patient or staff member was detected to have COVID-19 infection.Methods: This retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in North India. Data of patients admitted to the inpatient unit from March 24, 2019, to March 23, 2020, were compared with data from March 24, 2020, to March 23, 2021. The data were extracted from the inpatient registry.Results: Compared to the pre-pandemic period, fewer patients were admitted during the pandemic, and the patients admitted had more severe illness. During the ongoing pandemic, the incidence of COVID-19 infection among the residents was 5%, nursing staff was 4.7%, and support staff was 6.66%. The incidence rate of COVID-19 among the patients was 3.2%. Patients were not found to be the primary source of infection; on the other hand, COVID-positive status among the health care professionals was responsible for patients becoming infected.Conclusions: During the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, psychiatry inpatient facility can be managed with reduced capacity and by following COVD-19 protocol.

2.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 23(5)2021 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485270

ABSTRACT

Objective: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected all aspects of psychiatric care, including consultation-liaison psychiatry (CLP) services. The objective of this study was to assess the demographic and clinical profiles of psychiatric referrals made to CLP services during the pandemic period and compare to data during the same timeframe from the previous year at a tertiary care center in North India.Methods: Data of patients referred for CLP consultation and seen by the CLP team in the medical-surgical wards wherein COVID-negative patients were admitted during the period of March 24, 2020, to October 11, 2020 (approximately 6.5 months, 201 days) were extracted from the CLP register (routinely maintained). These data were compared with that of the same timeframe from the previous year (March 24, 2019, to October 11, 2019).Results: During 2020, a total of 562 patients were referred to CLP services, in contrast to 1,005 patients referred in 2019, suggesting a 44% reduction in the number of referrals made to CLP services. During 2020, CLP referral patients more often had metabolic/endocrine disorders, myocardial infarction, and peripheral vascular diseases and less often had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/asthma and autoimmune disorders compared to 2019. Also, the number of referrals made to CLP services in 2020 for treatment of new disorders declined significantly (P < .001), whereas referrals for abnormal behavior/uncooperativeness (P < .001), self-harm attempts (P = .007), and other reasons (evaluation for organ transplant, sleep disturbances; P = .029) increased significantly. Further, significantly higher percentages of patients were diagnosed with delirium (P = .03) and depressive disorders (P = .04) in 2020 compared to 2019.Conclusions: There was a significant increase in the number of psychiatric referrals for depressive disorders and self-harm attempts among admitted patients from medical-surgical units during the COVID period. These findings suggest that there is a need to modify CLP services to address the needs of patients referred to CLP services, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychiatry , Humans , India/epidemiology , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
3.
Brain Behav Immun Health ; 18: 100345, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1427574

ABSTRACT

There is a sudden upsurge in the use of steroids due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, especially in patients with severe or critical COVID-19 infection. There are reports of excessive use of steroids, both in terms of use in patients who do not require the same and use in doses higher than the recommended. There are reports of the emergence of different adverse outcomes of excessive steroid use in the form of diabetes mellitus and a higher incidence of mucormycosis. However, little attention has been paid to the mental health impact of the use of steroids. This review attempts to evaluate the existing data in terms of incidence of psychiatric side effects of steroids, and the risk factors for steroid associated psychiatric manifestations. Additionally, an attempt is made to discuss the pathogenesis of steroid-associated psychiatric side effects and why it is likely that the incidence of psychiatric side effects may be more in patients with COVID-19 infection. There is a need to improve the awareness about the psychiatric side effects of steroids, both among the physicians and mental health professionals, as in any patient presenting with new-onset psychiatric symptoms while having COVID-19 infection or during the post-COVID-19 infection phase, a possibility of steroid associated side effect needs to be considered.

4.
Asian J Psychiatr ; 65: 102817, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392127

ABSTRACT

The paper examines the global research output on suicidal behavior during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Scopus database was used to identify the publications on suicidal behavior during the COVID-19 pandemic from the beginning of the pandemic to up to 17th May 2021. The 686 publications emerging from 78 countries were found on the topic. These publications received 7970 citations, with an average of 11.62 citations per paper. About one-sixth (16.33%) of the total publications were funded, and these publications averaged 17.24 citations per paper. The publications from the top 10 most productive countries accounted for 92.71% of all publications. The highest number of publications emerged from United States, United Kingdom, and India. However, the relative citation index was highest for publications arising from France, Bangladesh, and Germany. The total number of organizations and authors involved in these publications were 286 and 290, respectively. The top 20 most productive organizations and authors contributed to 35.13% and 17.64% of publications and 79.15% and 58.61% global citations share, respectively. The maximum number of papers were published in the Asian Journal of Psychiatry, followed by Psychiatry Research and Lancet Psychiatry. This study suggests that suicidal behavior has received considerable attention during the ongoing COIVD-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Bibliometrics , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Suicidal Ideation , United States
5.
Asian J Psychiatr ; 64: 102815, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363856

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Few studies have highlighted multiple psychosocial and physical outcomes in patients with COVID-19 infection after recovery. However, the data from developing countries is limited. AIM: To evaluate psychological morbidity, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), fatigue, and perceived stigma among patients with COVID-19 after recovery from the acute phase of COVID-19 infection. METHODS: In a cross-sectional online survey, 206 adult patients (age>18 years), recovered from COVID-19 infection completed the Patient Health Questionnaire-4 (PHQ-4), the Impact of Events Scale-Revised (IES-R), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), 4 items self-designed questionnaire evaluating cognitive deficits and self-designed questionnaire to evaluate perceived stigma. Additionally, they completed the information about demographic and clinical information. RESULTS: The prevalence of anxiety, depressive symptoms, and PTSD in the study sample was 24.8 %, 23.8 %, and 30 % respectively. About three-fifths of the participants (61.2 %) had at least one fatigue symptom as per the FSS with the mean FSS score being 32.10 ± 15.28. About one-fourth of the participants (23.7 %) reported "feeling confused and always feeling mentally foggy", and 38 % of patients reported experiencing at least one cognitive problem. The level of felt stigma related to self was seen in 31.1 %, 20 % reported stigma related to family, and 50 % reported stigma in relation to neighbors and society. Those reporting higher PTSD scores had higher anxiety and depressive scores, reported more fatigue and stigma, and had a higher level of cognitive deficits. A higher fatigue score was also associated with higher anxiety, depression, and cognitive deficits. CONCLUSIONS: Our study reveals that a significant proportion of patients after recovery from COVID-19 experience psychological morbidities, fatigue, cognitive problems, and stigma. Efforts should be made to take care of these issues in routine post-COVID follow-up care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety , Cognition , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Humans , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report
9.
Journal of Indian Association for Child & Adolescent Mental Health ; 17(3):167-181, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1292396

ABSTRACT

This study aims to evaluate the global research focusing on the mental health of Children & adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic by using bibliometry. The bibliometric parameters considered for this study include the country of origin of the publications, organizations of the authors, keywords of the research focusing on the issue, and the citations received by these publications. Scopus database was used to search for the publications on “Impact of COVID-19 on Mental Health of Children and Adolescents” by using different key words, published upto 1st of May 2021. The Scopus search engine yielded 1797 publications related to the impact of COVID-19 on the Mental Health of Children & Adolescents. It was seen that researchers from top 10 most countries contributed to the 95.55% share of international publications output, with researchers from the United States, China, and United Kingdom accounting for 28.05%, 13.97%, and 13.69% of the global publication share. The most common keywords, in terms of focus of research included mental health, followed by anxiety and depression. The top 10 Universities and authors were from the high-income countries with highest representation from the United States. To conclude, this bibliographic analysis suggests that over a short span of time 1797 publications have emerged on the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health aspects of the children and adolescents, with majority of the publications emerging from high income countries. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Indian Association for Child & Adolescent Mental Health is the property of Indian Association for Child & Adolescent Mental Health and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

10.
Journal of Indian Association for Child & Adolescent Mental Health ; 17(3):127-142, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1292395

ABSTRACT

Aim: To assess the impact of online classes (started in view of COVID-19 pandemic) on the physical and psycho-behavioural parameters of children as perceived by their parents. Methodology: A cross-sectional web-based survey was carried out among the parents of children attending the online classes due to the ongoing pandemic. Results: 289 parents (either mother/father, or any other relative;67.8% - mothers) responded to the survey. The majority of the responders perceived online classes to be less comfortable, less satisfactory;and reported that their children had poor attention and concentration, had a lower level of learning in the theoretical and practical aspect of the subject. Most parents reported their child gets distracted and engages in surfing the internet or participating in online competitions. About half of the parents reported an increase in irritability (45.0%), the increased demand to go to school (45.0%), and a reduction in self-hygiene/care (43.3%). The other common behavioural problems as reported were stubbornness (36.3%), demanding behaviour (30.0%), tantrums (27.3%), and manipulativeness (27.0%). Conclusion: These preliminary findings suggest that the level of learning with in-person school-based classes is far superior to the online classes. The online classes might have a negative impact on the behaviour and physical health of the children. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Indian Association for Child & Adolescent Mental Health is the property of Indian Association for Child & Adolescent Mental Health and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

11.
Indian J Psychiatry ; 63(3): 222-227, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296031

ABSTRACT

Background: Little information is available from India about the psychological impact of COVID-19 on helath-care workers. Aim: The current study aimed to evaluate the psychological issues among the health-care workers (HCW) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and Methods: An online survey using Survey Monkey® platform was carried out to evaluate depression (using Patient Health Questionnaire-9), anxiety (using Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire-7), and other psychological issues (using a self-designed questionnaire). Results: The study sample comprised 303 participants with a mean age of 41.2 (standard deviation: 11.1) years. A majority of them were male (69%) and married (79.9%). Nearly half (46.2%) of the participants had either anxiety disorder or depression or both and 12.9% of HCW had suicidal behavior. Higher level of anxiety and depression scores were associated with being female, having undergone quarantine, directly involved in the care of COVID-19 patients, and younger age (<30 years). Higher prevalence of depression and anxiety disorder was seen in younger (<30 years) age group, being a doctor (compared to paramedics). In addition, higher prevalence of depression was seen in those who were directly involved in the care of patients with COVID-19 infection. Conclusion: About half of the HCWs are suffering from psychiatric morbidity, specifically anxiety, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. There is a need to assess all the HCWs for psychiatric morbidity and provide them with psychological support.

12.
Int J Gen Med ; 14: 2491-2506, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282362

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is an ongoing pandemic with many challenges that are now extending to its intriguing long-term sequel. 'Long-COVID-19' is a term given to the lingering or protracted illness that patients of COVID-19 continue to experience even in their post-recovery phase. It is also being called 'post-acute COVID-19', 'ongoing symptomatic COVID-19', 'chronic COVID-19', 'post COVID-19 syndrome', and 'long-haul COVID-19'. Fatigue, dyspnea, cough, headache, brain fog, anosmia, and dysgeusia are common symptoms seen in Long-COVID-19, but more varied and debilitating injuries involving pulmonary, cardiovascular, cutaneous, musculoskeletal and neuropsychiatric systems are also being reported. With the data on Long-COVID-19 still emerging, the present review aims to highlight its epidemiology, protean clinical manifestations, risk predictors, and management strategies. With the re-emergence of new waves of SARS-CoV-2 infection, Long-COVID-19 is expected to produce another public health crisis on the heels of current pandemic. Thus, it becomes imperative to emphasize this condition and disseminate its awareness to medical professionals, patients, the public, and policymakers alike to prepare and augment health care facilities for continued surveillance of these patients. Further research comprising cataloging of symptoms, longer-ranging observational studies, and clinical trials are necessary to evaluate long-term consequences of COVID-19, and it warrants setting-up of dedicated, post-COVID care, multi-disciplinary clinics, and rehabilitation centers.

13.
Andrologia ; 53(8): e14136, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266303

ABSTRACT

The effect of COVID-19 on the male reproductive tract has been sparsely studied. This exploratory study was designed to determine the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in the semen of men recovering from COVID-19. A systematic literature review was also performed as per PRISMA guidelines to gather perspective on this topic. The prospective study included men 21 years and older recovering from COVID-19 with nasopharyngeal swab negative for SARS-CoV-2 or at least two weeks from the last COVID RT-PCR positivity. After clinical evaluation, freshly ejaculated semen sample by masturbation was collected in a sterile container. Samples were processed for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 by RT-PCR. Twenty-one patients were contacted for the study, 11 of which consented to provide a semen sample. The mean age of the cohort was 29.72 ± 4.52 years. None of the patients gave a history of epididymo-orchitis or sexual dysfunction at the time of assessment. None of the semen samples demonstrated SARS-CoV-2 on RT-PCR. Median duration of semen sample collection from the COVID positivity was 44 days (Range 19-59 days). Detailed literature review revealed that SARS-CoV-2 is not found in patients recovering from COVID-19 infection. We conclude that SARS-CoV-2 is not found in the semen of patients recovering from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , RNA, Viral , Semen
15.
Indian J Psychiatry ; 63(2): 134-141, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1210071

ABSTRACT

Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of lockdown on sexual functioning in India. In addition, impact of lockdown on relationship with the partner and mental health was evaluated. Materials and Methods: An online survey was conducted using changes in sexual functioning questionnaire, Patient Health Questionnaire-4, and a self-designed questionnaire. Results: The mean age of the participants was 41.5 (standard deviation: 11.2; range: 22-77; median: 39.5) years, with the majority being males 385 (85.6%). The participants reported that lockdown led to reduction in the frequency of sexual intercourse and also touching the partner (fondling, caressing, touching, or kissing) when not indulging in sexual intercourse. Majority of the participants reported improvement in the overall relationship, communication with the partner, and interpersonal conflicts. About two-fifths of the participants reported engaging in sexual intercourse more than twice a week or more. About one-fifth screened positive for psychiatric morbidity, with 14.2% screened positive for anxiety, 14.8% screened positive for depression and 8.7% screened positive for both. In both genders, presence of depression and anxiety were associated with lower sexual functioning in all the domains. Conclusion: Lockdown led to a reduction in the frequency of sexual intercourse, and reduction in the frequency of intimacy in the form of fondling, caressing, touching, or kissing partner when not doing sexual intercourse. However, lockdown led to the improvement in overall relationship and communication with the partners and a reduction in interpersonal conflicts.

16.
Indian J Psychiatry ; 63(2): 201-203, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209095
17.
Braz J Anesthesiol ; 71(3): 292-294, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1144515

ABSTRACT

Catatonic patients may develop deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) due to prolonged periods of immobility. These life-threatening conditions demand prompt recognition and management. We describe the case of a patient with catatonia who presented to anesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) at the outset of the current coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. She complained of breathing difficulty and was suspected to have COVID-19 infection. On further evaluation, she was found to have DVT and PE and required oxygen therapy and intensive care management. The diagnostic delay in our patient would have probably not occurred, had it not been for the existing pandemic situation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Catatonia/complications , Delayed Diagnosis , Electroconvulsive Therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis , Anesthesia , Catatonia/therapy , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Oxygen/therapeutic use , Pulmonary Embolism/therapy , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Venous Thrombosis/therapy
18.
Front Psychol ; 12: 611314, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133970

ABSTRACT

Background: Risks to healthcare workers have escalated during the pandemic and they are likely to experience a greater level of stress. This cross-sectional study investigated mental distress among healthcare workers during the early phase of Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) outbreak in India. Method: 140 healthcare workers of a tertiary care hospital in India were assessed for perceived stress and insomnia. A factor analysis with principal component method reduced these questions to four components which were categorized as insomnia, stress-related anxiety, stress-related irritability, and stress-related hopelessness. Further statistical analyses were done on these factor scores to identify the predictors and investigate the differences between the different categories of healthcare workers. Result: Doctors had the highest level of anxiety among the healthcare workers. Both doctors and nurses perceived a greater level of irritability than the other HCWs. Compared to doctors and nurses, other HCWs were more likely to experience insomnia. Lower age, higher education, female gender, and urban habitat were associated with greater perception of anxiety. Older age, being quarantined, and single marital status were the significant predictors of irritability. Female gender, single marital-status, and higher number of medical ailments contributed to perceived hopelessness. Quarantine significantly predicted insomnia. Conclusion: Different categories of healthcare workers are experiencing varied mental health problems owing to their heterogeneous socio-demographic backgrounds. Tailored and personalized care, as well as policies, might help in alleviating their problems. Further research is warranted to explore the psychological distress and remedies among these frontline workers during and after the ongoing pandemic crisis.

19.
Indian Journal of Clinical Cardiology ; : 26324636211000580, 2021.
Article in English | Sage | ID: covidwho-1124522
20.
ISBT Sci Ser ; 16(2): 147-157, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125196

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) has impacted and pushed the healthcare settings to extremes across the globe. It was extremely challenging to sustain blood donation, and strategies could be formulated on knowing fears hindering blood donation. Methods: A cross-sectional survey using Google Forms® through WhatsApp and email after obtaining the ethical clearance. The survey questionnaire was validated for content using the Delphi technique, and pilot tested for finalization. Results: The survey was attempted by 1066 participants, and 749 participants who had not donated since pandemic were included in the study. A little more than half, 415 (55%) reported either one or more than one fear during the pandemic which hindered blood donation. They reported lack of confidence in the safety measures at the hospitals and fear of transmitting infection to family, in 415 (55%) of the participants each, respectively. The fear of COVID-19 hospital infection risk and hospital entry was statistically significant across the age groups that are eligible for blood donation. Conclusions: The clear and dedicated confidence building measures to sustain blood donation using all communication modalities clearly emerge as the most important strategies to augment blood donation in the COVID-19 pandemic. The measures should include information about implementation of safety measures to mitigate COVID-19 transmission at the blood centres and that the act of blood donation does not increase risk of COVID-19 and therefore the risk of transmission of infection to family.

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