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1.
Minerva Surg ; 2021 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485663

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The aim of this systematic review was to report and to analyze if there is and what is the impact of telemedicine in the surgical practice during COVID-19 pandemic. Many authors have posited that the pandemic urged a high implementation of the telemedicine service even in surgical specialties, however, the impact of this change of the clinical practice has been variably reported and its utilization in general surgery is uncertain. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: All articles from any country written in English, Italian, Spanish, or French, about the use of telemedicine for indication to surgical treatment or for 30-day postoperative follow-up in general surgery during the COVID 19 outbreak, from the March 1, 2020, to December 1, 2020, were included. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: Two hundred nine articles were fully analyzed, and 207 further articles were excluded. Finally, 2 articles, both published in October 2020, were included in the present systematic review. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, the rapid spread of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has forced to review the traditional methods to deliver surgical assistance and urged surgeons to find alternative methods to continue their practice. The literature about this topic is yet scarce and many questions regarding its efficacy in improving patients' health, cost-effectiveness and user satisfaction remain unsolved.

2.
Minerva Chir ; 75(5): 298-304, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456626

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Morgagni hernias present technical challenges. The laparoscopic approach for repair was first described in 1992; however, as these hernias are uncommon in adult life, few data exist on the optimal method for surgical management. The purpose of this study was to analyze a method for laparoscopic repair of Morgagni giant hernias using laparoscopic primary closure with V lock (Medtronic, Covidien). METHODS: This case series describes a method of laparoscopic Morgagni hernia repair using primary closure. In all patients, a laparoscopic transabdominal approach was used. The content of the hernia was reduced into the abdomen, and the diaphragmatic defect was closed with a running laparoscopic suture using a self-fixating suture. Clips were placed at the edges of the suture to secure the pledged sutures to both the anterior and posterior fascia. Demographic data such as BMI and operative and postoperative data were collected. RESULTS: Retrospectively collected data for 9 patients were analyzed. There were 1 (11.1%) males and 8 (88.8%) females. The median BMI was 29.14±52 kg/m2. The median operative time was 80±25 minutes. There were no intraoperative complications or conversions to open surgery. Patients began a fluid diet on the first postoperative day and were discharged after a median hospital stay of 3±1.87 days. In a median follow-up of 36 months, we did not observe any recurrences. CONCLUSIONS: Transabdominal laparoscopic approach with primary closure of the diaphragmatic defect is a viable approach for the repair of Morgagni hernia. In our experience, the use of laparoscopic transabdominal suture fixed to the fascia allowed the closure of the defect laparoscopically with minimal tension on the repairs.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Wound Closure Techniques , Hernias, Diaphragmatic, Congenital/surgery , Herniorrhaphy/methods , Laparoscopy , Suture Techniques , Aged , Body Mass Index , Fasciotomy , Female , Hernias, Diaphragmatic, Congenital/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Medical Illustration , Operative Time , Retrospective Studies
3.
World J Clin Cases ; 9(23): 6759-6767, 2021 Aug 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359453

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute colonic diverticulitis (ACD) is common in Western countries, with its prevalence increasing throughout the world. As a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), elective surgery and in-patients' visits have been cancelled or postponed worldwide. AIM: To systematically explore the impact of the pandemic in the management of ACD. METHODS: MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus, MedxRiv, and the Cochrane Library databases were searched to 22 December 2020. Studies which reported on the management of patients with ACD during the COVID-19 pandemic were eligible. For cross sectional studies, outcomes of interest included the number of hospital admission for ACD, as well as key features of disease severity (complicated or not) across two time periods (pre- and during lockdown). RESULTS: A total of 69 papers were inspected, and 21 were eligible for inclusion. Ten papers were cross sectional studies from seven world countries; six were case reports; three were qualitative studies, and two review articles. A 56% overall decrease in admissions for ACD was observed during lockdown, peaking 67% in the largest series. A 4%-8% decrease in the rate of uncomplicated diverticulitis was also noted during the lockdown phase. An initial non-operative management was recommended for complicated diverticulitis, and encouraged to an out-of-hospital regimen. Despite initial concerns on the use of laparoscopy for Hinchey 3 and 4 patients to avoid aerosolized contamination, societal bodies have progressively mitigated their initial recommendations as actual risks are yet to be ascertained. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, fewer patients presented and were diagnosed with ACD. Such decline may have likely affected the spectrum of uncomplicated disease. Established outpatient management and follow up for selected cases may unburden healthcare resources in time of crisis.

4.
Updates Surg ; 73(2): 745-752, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1002181

ABSTRACT

Since the beginning of the pandemic due to the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and its related disease, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), several articles reported negative outcomes in surgery of infected patients. Aim of this study is to report results of patients with COVID-19-positive swab, in the perioperative period after surgery. Data of COVID-19-positive patients undergoing emergent or oncological surgery, were collected in a retrospective, multicenter study, which involved 20 Italian institutions. Collected parameters were age, sex, body mass index, COVID-19-related symptoms, patients' comorbidities, surgical procedure, personal protection equipment (PPE) used in operating rooms, rate of postoperative infection among healthcare staff and complications, within 30-postoperative days. 68 patients, who underwent surgery, resulted COVID-19-positive in the perioperative period. Symptomatic patients were 63 (92.5%). Fever was the main symptom in 36 (52.9%) patients, followed by dyspnoea (26.5%) and cough (13.2%). We recorded 22 (32%) intensive care unit admissions, 23 (33.8%) postoperative pulmonary complications and 15 (22%) acute respiratory distress syndromes. As regards the ten postoperative deaths (14.7%), 6 cases were related to surgical complications. One surgeon, one scrub nurse and two circulating nurses were infected after surgery due to the lack of specific PPE. We reported less surgery-related pulmonary complications and mortality in Sars-CoV-2-infected patients, than in literature. Emergent and oncological surgery should not be postponed, but it is mandatory to use full PPE, and to adopt preoperative screenings and strategies that mitigate the detrimental effect of pulmonary complications, mostly responsible for mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/mortality , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/transmission , Emergencies , Female , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
5.
World J Emerg Surg ; 15(1): 38, 2020 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-574739

ABSTRACT

Following the spread of the infection from the new SARS-CoV2 coronavirus in March 2020, several surgical societies have released their recommendations to manage the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic for the daily clinical practice. The recommendations on emergency surgery have fueled a debate among surgeons on an international level.We maintain that laparoscopic cholecystectomy remains the treatment of choice for acute cholecystitis, even in the COVID-19 era. Moreover, since laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not more likely to spread the COVID-19 infection than open cholecystectomy, it must be organized in such a way as to be carried out safely even in the present situation, to guarantee the patient with the best outcomes that minimally invasive surgery has shown to have.


Subject(s)
Cholecystectomy/standards , Cholecystitis, Acute/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Infection Control/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cholecystectomy/methods , Cholecystitis, Acute/virology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical
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