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1.
Am J Obstet Gynecol MFM ; : 100703, 2022 Aug 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966285

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 related placentitis shows distinctive histological characteristics and its impact on perinatal outcomes is increasingly coming under scrutiny. We present two such cases in the third trimester, following mild maternal clinical symptoms and associated with maternal coagulopathy, reduced fetal movements and non-reassuring fetal heart rate tracing. Both cases resulted in emergency cesarean deliveries. Our cases and a review of the literature highlight that SARS-CoV-2 undermines placental function and thus greatly impacts late-term pregnancies, even in the absence of severe systemic disease.w.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-310346

ABSTRACT

Background: The virus responsible of severe acute respiratory syndrome named SARS-CoV-2 and causing the new coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has gone global within three months. The current gold standard technique used to detect SARS-CoV-2 is real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) from naso-pharyngeal swabs but it may be negative in up to 30% of COVID-19 patients. Detection of specific antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 may therefore enhance sensitivity of the current biological diagnosis, as well as monitor the extent of the epidemics in global or specific population, such as health-care worker. Many serological assays are currently available, but their clinical performances are still to be evaluated.Material and Method: A total of 2,594 serum samples collected from patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection documented by a positive rRT-PCR were enrolled in this study. They were tested for IgM/IgG/IgA against SARS-CoV-2 using 31 commercial assays. Antibody response was assessed depending on the onset of symptoms. In addition, 1,996 pre-epidemic serum samples expected to be negative were tested to assess specificity.Results: Rapid tests for qualitative detection of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies (RDTs) achieved 77.4-100%, and ELISA/CLIA (ELISA) assays 58.8-100% for SARS-CoV-2-specific total antibodies (TAb) specificity. From 15 days after onset of symptoms, 13/18 RDT and 8/13 ELISA reached sensitivity > 90%. However, only 4 RDT and 3 ELISA assays fitted both sensitivity (> 90%) and specificity (> 98%) criteria according to French recommendations.Conclusions: Serology may offer valuable information during the course of COVID-19 pandemic, at the condition that commercial assays give reliable results. Contrasted performances were observed among the 31 commercial assays we evaluated, which underlines the importance of independent evaluation before clinical implementation.Funding Statement: This study was funded by the Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le SIDA et les Hépatites Virales (ANRS, AC43)".Declaration of Interests: JM Pawlotsky has served as an advisor and/or a speaker for Abbvie, Gilead, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck, Regulus and Siemens Healthcare. C Vauloup-Fellous served as un expert (rubella and CMV serology) for Abbott Diagnostics, Roche Diagnostics, Siemens Healthcare and DiaSorin. No other authors have any competing interests to declare.Ethics Approval Statement: The study was carried out in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. This work was a retrospective non-interventional study with no addition to standard care procedures. Reclassification of biological remnants into research material after completion of the ordered virological tests was approved by the local interventional review board of hospital. According to the French Public Health Code (CSP Article L.1121-1.1) such protocols are exempted from individual informed consent.

3.
Euro Surveill ; 26(13)2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167263

ABSTRACT

BackgroundChildren have a low rate of COVID-19 and secondary severe multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS) but present a high prevalence of symptomatic seasonal coronavirus infections.AimWe tested if prior infections by seasonal coronaviruses (HCoV) NL63, HKU1, 229E or OC43 as assessed by serology, provide cross-protective immunity against SARS-CoV-2 infection.MethodsWe set a cross-sectional observational multicentric study in pauci- or asymptomatic children hospitalised in Paris during the first wave for reasons other than COVID (hospitalised children (HOS), n = 739) plus children presenting with MIS (n = 36). SARS-CoV-2 antibodies directed against the nucleoprotein (N) and S1 and S2 domains of the spike (S) proteins were monitored by an in-house luciferase immunoprecipitation system assay. We randomly selected 69 SARS-CoV-2-seropositive patients (including 15 with MIS) and 115 matched SARS-CoV-2-seronegative patients (controls (CTL)). We measured antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 and HCoV as evidence for prior corresponding infections and assessed if SARS-CoV-2 prevalence of infection and levels of antibody responses were shaped by prior seasonal coronavirus infections.ResultsPrevalence of HCoV infections were similar in HOS, MIS and CTL groups. Antibody levels against HCoV were not significantly different in the three groups and were not related to the level of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in the HOS and MIS groups. SARS-CoV-2 antibody profiles were different between HOS and MIS children.ConclusionPrior infection by seasonal coronaviruses, as assessed by serology, does not interfere with SARS-CoV-2 infection and related MIS in children.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome , Adolescent , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Paris , Seasons , Serologic Tests/methods , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
4.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 40(10): 2235-2241, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156953

ABSTRACT

We report evaluation of 30 assays' (17 rapid tests (RDTs) and 13 automated/manual ELISA/CLIA assay (IAs)) clinical performances with 2594 sera collected from symptomatic patients with positive SARS-CoV-2 rRT-PCR on a respiratory sample, and 1996 pre-epidemic serum samples expected to be negative. Only 4 RDT and 3 IAs fitted both specificity (> 98%) and sensitivity (> 90%) criteria according to French recommendations. Serology may offer valuable information during COVID-19 pandemic, but inconsistent performances observed among the 30 commercial assays evaluated, which underlines the importance of independent evaluation before clinical implementation.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19/blood , Immunoassay/methods , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Immunoassay/economics , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Reagent Kits, Diagnostic , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sensitivity and Specificity
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