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2.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 38(3): 232-233, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096530
3.
Chest ; 162(4):A2032, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2060888

ABSTRACT

SESSION TITLE: Studies on COVID-19 Infections Posters SESSION TYPE: Original Investigation Posters PRESENTED ON: 10/18/2022 01:30 pm - 02:30 pm PURPOSE: Two years into the COVID-19 pandemic, knowledge about how infection affects children is still lacking. Unlike adults, prior to the recent surge widespread symptomatic childhood illness has not been seen, likely due to school shutdowns, strict social distancing, and less severe illness course. During the omicron surge in NYC, an increase in pediatric cases was noted likely due to reinstatement of in-person learning and relaxing of social distancing. Though vaccines were available, only 9% of children aged 5-11 years and 35% of adolescents aged 12-17 years were vaccinated. During omicron surge, a large proportion of adult patients positive for COVID-19 were asymptomatic. We aimed to explore incidence of ED visits, hospital admissions, vaccine status and presenting complaints in pediatric population who tested positive for COVID-19 during the omicron surge in NYC. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted of patients <18 years who tested positive for COVID-19 at two multiethnic community hospitals during the Omicron wave (Nov 1, 2021-Feb 28, 2022). Demographics, vaccine status, reason for visit, diagnosis and disposition were extracted from EHR. Data were analyzed according to age group: 0 to <5 years (G1), 5 to <12 years (G2) and 12 to <18 years (G3). RESULTS: During this time, close to 2800 patients tested positive for COVID-19 at presentation to the ED or during hospitalization. Of these, 343 were <18 years of age (~10%). Overall, 53% of these pediatric patients were male. Ethnic make-up mirrored that of our community (approx. 60% Hispanic, 20% Asian, 10% Black). Admission status included 27 (7.8%) admitted to our hospitals, 18 (5.2%) transferred to other hospitals from our ED, and 298 (87%) treated and released from the ED. By age group, 183 (59%) were in G1, 76 (24%) in G2 and 51 (17%) in G3. Patients in G1 were <5 years and therefore ineligible for vaccine. Only 5% of G2 and 33% of G3 were fully vaccinated. In all groups, majority of patients presented for symptoms of viral infection (G1>80%, G2>90%, G3>90%). Symptoms of upper respiratory infection were most frequent in all groups (>80%). Convulsions (4.3%, 1.3%), croup (8.2%, 2.6%) and otitis media (3.3%, 1.3%) were noted in G1 and G2, respectively. In G3, acute appendicitis, diabetic ketoacidosis, and otitis media were present on admission in 2% each. Majority of patients requiring admission were from G1 (74%). CONCLUSIONS: Though adults during the recent surge often presented with asymptomatic COVID-19, pediatric patients in our sample typically presented for viral illness. It is difficult to interpret vaccine data except to say that there was a small group of pediatric patients who were symptomatic despite vaccination. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: We present early descriptive data from the Omicron surge in NYC in a pediatric sample. DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Won Baik-Han No relevant relationships by Tamana Bismillah No relevant relationships by Kelly Cervellione no disclosure on file for Gagan Gulati;No relevant relationships by LOCHANA KC No relevant relationships by Lily Lew

4.
Publicaciones de la Facultad de Educacion y Humanidades del Campus de Melilla ; 51(2):402-408, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1879790

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses have been responsible for the emergence of pathogenic human diseases in recent decades, especially the coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19). Phylogenetic studies of RNA (ribonucleic acid) viruses suggest that most human coronaviruses originated in bats, which are suitable reservoir hosts for many zoonotic viruses because of their unique biological and physiological features. The generation of human pathogenic coronaviruses is a result of genetic adaptation in bats and/or intermediate hosts, leading to spillover events. Therefore, we propose that specifically reducing or disrupting persistent coronavirus infection in bats may consequently decrease the frequency of human coronavirus diseases. We suggest several strategies to achieve the aforementioned goal in bats, including vaccination and targeted delivery of molecular inhibitors, such as monoclonal antibodies, aptamers, antisense oligonucleotides, and siRNA by use of viral nanoparticles. Advances in global bat research with the aim of controlling coronavirus infection in these mammals are pivotal in enhancing human health worldwide. Copyright © 2022 Nahreini et al.

5.
Journal of Investigative Medicine ; 70(4):1164-1165, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1868770

ABSTRACT

Purpose of Study Acute appendicitis (AA) is the most common abdominal surgical emergency in pediatrics. There was a precipitous drop in pediatric visits to hospitals, including the emergency department, since the US declared COVID-19 a national emergency. Managing AA during the pandemic remains a challenge as fear of COVID exposure can lead to delays in presentation and surgery, as well as a shift to conservative management. Alvarado score (AS) is a ten-point clinical scoring system to identify AA and the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) grading system (I-V) are validated tools for AA diagnosis and severity. There are no studies on prevalence and severity of AA during the COVID- 19 pandemic in an urban multiethnic community. Objective To compare prevalence and severity of AA before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods Used This was a retrospective chart review of patients admitted to Flushing Hospital Medical Center and Jamaica Hospital Medical Center with the diagnosis of AA from March 2018 to March 2021. Charts were reviewed for demographics, clinical, imaging and surgical data to determine AS and AAST. AS grouped from 1-6 (less likely to require surgery) and 7-10 (more likely to require surgery). AAST scoring was based on most severe criteria if grading discrepancies were found between pathology, surgical and computed tomography findings. Leukocytosis was defined as white blood cell count >10. G1 identified AA cases March 2018 - February 2020 and G2 March 2020 - March 2021. Data was analyzed using SPSS software, p<0.05 considered significant. Summary of Results Of 239 patients with AA over 3 years, G1 totaled 184 (77%) in 2 years pre-pandemic and G2 had 55 (23%) during first year pandemic. Mean age, gender and ethnicity were similar for G1 and G2. AS and AAST were compared for G1 and G2, table 1. G2 had significantly greater overall AS of >7 (p=0.038) and higher AAST (p=0.016). Only three patients tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 and 9 (16%) of G2 were transferred to a tertiary care center. Conclusions Although there was a decline in number of AA evaluated in our emergency department, the severity of AA was heightened during the pandemic. Healthcare providers need to have a high index of suspicion of increased severity with complications of AA. (Table Presented).

6.
Irish Journal of Medical Science ; 191(SUPPL 1):S34, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1866670

ABSTRACT

Considerable literature has reported the COVID-19 pandemic's negative mental health sequelae. This surge in mental health problems will likely present to primary care in the coming months. The development of interventions to support GPs in the care of patients with mental health problems is a priority. The aim of this review was to examine interventions which could be implemented in general practice to enhance care of mental health disorders post COVID-19. PubMed, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar and WHO Global Research on COVID-19 databases were searched following Arksey and O'Malley's scoping review process(1). Initial searches identified 148 articles. Twenty-nine studies were included in the review, mostly randomised control trials, qualitative interviews and surveys. Outcome measures to test feasibility of interventions included the 'Seven-item Generalised Anxiety Disorder Scale' and 'Nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire'. Results were divided into themes: Interventions to improve identification of mental health disorders;Interventions to support GPs;Therapeutic interventions;Telemedicine interventions, and barriers and facilitators to intervention implementation. Interventions requiring active involvement of patients in their own care may be effective. GPs should encourage participation in physical activity andmeditation, implement digitalmental health interventions and incorporate telemedicine into their practice. Our findings suggest a broad range of interventions may be implemented in primary care to tackle the mental health sequelae of COVID-19. Practitioners worldwide must stay informed of relevant research, and actively implement studied interventions to improve the mental health care they offer. Priority areas for future research include biological treatments for mental health sequelae of COVID-19.

7.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 38(4): 313-314, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593781
8.
QJM ; 115(1): 5-6, 2022 Jan 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546020
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