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2.
Experimental & Clinical Transplantation: Official Journal of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation ; 20(Suppl 4):32-42, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2025256

ABSTRACT

Worldwide, India ranks number 2 and 3 for COVID-19 burden and absolute transplant numbers, respectively. Here, we summarized our single and multicenter Indian studies on solid-organ transplant during the COVID-19 pandemic. During the pandemic, solid-organ transplants declined 40% to 50%. The mortality rate in COVID-19-positive kidney transplant recipients (11.6%) was lower in India compared with the developed world during the first wave and lower compared with maintenance hemodialysis patients (13% to 38%) but significantly higher compared with the nonimmunosuppressed general population (1% to 3%) in India. We contributed to National Organ and Tissue Transplant Organization transplant-related guidelines to increase safety and access to solid-organ transplant. We reported the safety and feasibility of remdesivir (n = 57) and convalescent plasma therapy (n = 10) in kidney transplant recipients. We reported 100% patient and graft survival without any complications related to COVID-19 in a large cohort of kidney transplant recipients who recovered from COVID-19 (n = 372) and a large cohort of kidney transplant recipients of living donors (n = 31) who recovered from COVID-19 without any change in induction and maintenance immunosuppression. COVID-19 disease severity and mortality in the second episode (reoccurring infection) was higher (46%) compared with the first episode (11.6%). There was 4.4% incidence of COVID-19-associated mucormycosis in kidney transplant recipients with mortality of 46% in the second wave. We reported COVID-19 vaccine safety with suboptimal efficacy in kidney transplant recipients and dialysis patients compared with the general population. Our report suggested that transplant with carefully selected COVID-19-recovered donors and patients may be feasible and safe, at least over the short term. Continued research is needed on vaccine efficacy, booster doses, and long-term follow up sequelae.

4.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 40(16), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2009620

ABSTRACT

Background: Most patients with cancer and COVID-19 will survive the acute illness. The longer-term impacts of COVID-19 on patients with cancer remain incompletely described. Methods: Using COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium registry data thru 12/31/2021, we examined outcomes of long-term COVID-19 survivors with post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC aka “long COVID”). PASC was defined as having recovered w/ complications or having died w/ ongoing infection 90+ days from original diagnosis;absence of PASC was defined as having fully recovered by 90 days, with 90+ days of follow-up. Patients with SARS-CoV-2 re-infection and records with low quality data were excluded. Results: 858 of 3710 of included patients (23%) met PASC criteria. Median follow-up (IQR) for PASC and recovered patients was 180 (98-217) and 180 (90-180) days, respectively. The PASC group had a higher rate of baseline comorbidities and poor performance status (Table). Cancer types, status, and recent anticancer treatment were similar between the groups. The PASC group experienced a higher illness burden, with more hospitalized (83% vs 48%);requiring ICU (29% vs 6%);requiring mechanical ventilation (17% vs 2%);and experiencing co-infections (19% vs 8%). There were more deaths in the PASC vs recovered group (8% vs 3%), with median (IQR) days to death of 158 (120-272) and 180 (130-228), respectively. Of these, 9% were attributed to COVID-19;15% to both COVID-19 and cancer;15% to cancer;and 23% to other causes. Conversely, no deaths in the recovered group were attributed to COVID-19;57% were attributed to cancer;and 24% to other causes (proximal cause of death unknown/missing in 38% and 19%, respectively). Cancer treatment modification was more common in the recovered group (23% vs 18%). Conclusions: Patients with underlying comorbidities, worse ECOG PS, and more severe acute SARS-CoV-2 infection had higher rates of PASC. These patients suffered more severe complications and incurred worse outcomes. There was an appreciable rate of death in both PASC and non-PASC, with cancer the dominant but not only cause in fully recovered patients. Further study is needed to understand what factors drive PASC, and whether longer-term cancer-specific outcomes will be affected.

5.
Indian Journal of Transplantation ; 16(2):155-157, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1939190

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The coronavirus pandemic has restricted access to health-care services for kidney transplant patients because of concerns of COVID-19 infection. This single-center prospective study was done to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of telemedicine services for regular follow-up of kidney transplant patients as well as for triaging patients for admission. Methods: The study was undertaken during the lockdown period in India from March 23, 2020 to June 30, 2020. A formatted message seeking all relevant information was sent before teleconsultation. WhatsApp/email using smartphones and Electronic Medical Records system were used to provide telemedicine services. At the end of the e-consult, the patient was asked to rate his experience on a scale of 0-10. Results: A total of 296 consults for 122 patients were given. Of these, 239 (80.7%) consults (96 patients) were for domestic patients and 57 (19.3%) consults (26 patients) were for international patients. The mean age of the patients was 43 ± 15 years. The mean patient satisfaction score for e-consults was 9.5 ± 0.7. Four (3.3%) patients were seen for the first time after transplant via teleconsultation. Nine (7.4%) patients were advised admission and the rest were advised follow-up teleconsultation. Among those admitted, 6 (4.9%) were COVID positive and 1 (0.8%) patient died of COVID-19 pneumonia. Conclusions: Telemedicine offers a viable modality for health-care delivery when access to health care is restricted for transplant patients. Our model of telemedicine can be replicated easily without the burden of high cost for infrastructure.

6.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 205:1, 2022.
Article in English | English Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1880302
7.
Living with Pandemics: Places, People and Policy ; : 218-226, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1857232

ABSTRACT

This chapter explores the health response to the Covid-19 pandemic through three main areas: rapid behaviour change, leadership and relational dynamics, and strategic partnerships and interdependencies. Drawing on existing knowledge, it is argued that the pandemic prompted rapid operational change in the UK National Health Service (NHS), and challenged leaders to utilise directive and pacesetting styles alongside distributed models of leadership. The implications of health systems being rooted in political and economic paradigms are analysed, finding that the political aspects of health policy continued when addressing the pandemic. The chapter also finds that the pandemic reinforced the importance of strategic partnerships between the health and social care system. The ongoing challenges for leadership development, policy implications for health and social care architecture, and whether or not the change impetus will be maintained as the pandemic recedes are discussed within the wider debate about the future of health policy. © John R. Bryson, Lauren Andres, Aksel Ersoy and Louise Reardon 2021.

8.
Indian Journal of Transplantation ; 16(1):8-16, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1798829

ABSTRACT

COVID has drastically impacted organ donation across the world, leading to untold misery for thousands of patients who have been waiting for organs. Early rules on the use of organs from COVID positive or affected donors were stringent due to the fear of spread of disease or thrombotic complications in patients who received these organs. However much has changed in the past two years. Most of our adult population has either been infected with COVID, or has received two doses of vaccine, or both. The current variant, despite being more infective, is associated with mild disease, especially in those who have been vaccinated Our armamentarium against severe COVID has improved dramatically in the past year- we have effective vaccines, monoclonal antibodies for treatment of mild COVID in high risk patients and post exposure and antiviral prophylaxis and treatment which can substantially reduce the risk of severe COVID requiring ICU admission. The risk of transmission of COVID infection has to be balanced against the risk of patients dying with end organ disease. We will have to learn to live with COVID- this also means investigating whether organs from donors who are, or have been COVID positive can be used with acceptable risk -benefit in selected patients with end stage organ failure. This document is a summary of evidence and information regarding donor screening for SARS-CoV-2 and considerations for organ acceptance from donors with a history of COVID-19.

9.
Blood ; 138:4997, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1736320

ABSTRACT

Background : Patients (pts) with COVID-19 are reported to have increased risk of venous thromboembolism yet bleeding has been an under recognized complication. Rates of bleeding remain unexamined in all patients especially in pts with cancer and COVID-19. Aim: To estimate the incidence of bleeding complication in patients with cancer and COVID 19 Methods: The CCC19 international registry (NCT04354701) aims to investigate complications of COVID-19 in pts with cancer. Our aim was to investigate the frequency of bleeding in hospitalized adult pts with cancer andCOVID-19, enrolled between March 16, 2020 and Feb 8, 2021. The incidence of bleeding complications was captured as defined by CCC19 and included both major and non major bleeding. Associated baseline clinic-pathologic prognostic factors and outcomes such as need for mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and mortality rates were assessed Results :3849 pts met analysis inclusion criteria. Bleeding was reported in 276 (7%) pts with median age of 70years;incidence was 6.6 % in females and 7.6 % in males, 6.5% in non-Hispanic white pts, 8.2 % in non-Hispanic Black pts, and 7.8 % in Hispanic pts. 74% had solid cancer and 29% had hematologic malignancies, 33% had received anti-cancer therapy in preceding 30 days, and 8% had surgery within 4weeks. In pts taking antiplatelet or anticoagulant medications at baseline, 7.2% developed bleeding. Need for mechanical ventilation, ICU admission, 30-day mortality, and total mortality were significantly higher in those with bleeding complications compared to those without, p<0.05 Conclusion : We describe the incidence of bleeding in a large cohort of pts with cancer and COVID-19. Bleeding events were observed in those with adverse outcomes including mechanical ventilation, ICU admission, and high mortality;the overall mortality of 43% in patients with bleeding complications is especially notable. This important complication may reflect underlying COVID-19 pathophysiology as well as iatrogenic causes. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Kumar: Diagnostica Stago: Honoraria. Zon: AMAGMA AND RLZ: Consultancy, Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company. Byeff: Pfizer, BMS, Takeda,Teva, Merck, United health: Consultancy, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company, Current holder of stock options in a privately-held company. Nagaraj: Novartis: Research Funding. Hwang: astrazaneca,Merck,bayer, Genentech: Consultancy, Research Funding. McKay: Myovant: Consultancy;Bayer: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;AstraZeneca: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Exelixis: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Calithera: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Tempus: Research Funding;Merck: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Tempus: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Pfizer: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Janssen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Bristol Myers Squibb: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Sanofi: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Novartis: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Dendreon: Consultancy;Caris: Other: Serves as a molecular tumor board;Vividion: Consultancy;Sorrento Therapeutics: Consultancy;Bayer: Research Funding. Warner: Westat, Hemonc.org: Consultancy, Current holder of stock options in a privately-held company. Connors: Pfizer: Honoraria;CSL Behring: Research Funding;Alnylam: Consultancy;Bristol-Myers Squibb: Honoraria;takeda: Honoraria;Abbott: Consultancy. Rosovsky: Janssen: Consultancy, Research Funding;BMS: Consultancy, Research Funding;Inari: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Do a: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees.

10.
Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1405099

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This paper aims to fill the major research gap prevalent in the tourism literature on the new form of tourism branching out from the COVID-19. While there are newspaper reports mentioning about the government’s reaction to vaccine tourism, there is no such study or report that tries to understand what the global masses feel about it;thus, a preliminary investigation of the social sentiment and emotion accruing around vaccine tourism on Twitter is carried out. Design/methodology/approach: This exploratory study serves as a preliminary investigation of the social sentiment and emotion accruing around vaccine tourism on Twitter and tries to categorise them into eight basic emotions from Plutchik (1994) “wheel of emotions” as joy, disgust, fear, anger, anticipation, sadness, trust and surprise. The results are presented through data visualisation technique for analysis. The study makes use of R programming languages and the extensive packages offered on RStudio. Findings: A total of 12,258 emotions were captured. It is evident that Vaccine Tourism has got maximum of positive sentiments (28.14%) which is almost double of the negative sentiment (14.05%). It is visible that the highest sentiment is “trust” (12.74%) and is followed by “fear” (8.97%). The least visible sentiment is “surprise” (4.32%). Polarity has been found for maximum tweets as positive (55.52%) which yet again surpasses negative polarity (33.7%), and neutral polarity is the least (10.67%). Research limitations/implications: It can be said that people bear a positive emotion regarding vaccine tourism such as “trust” and “joy” which also denotes a positive sentiment score for testing polarity. But there are still concerns of high prices of the packages, fear-prevalent people to step out, and the uncertainty of right precautionary measures being taken still puts vaccine tourism under the radar of doubt with a fourth population having negative and neutral sentiments each. This is indicative with “fear” being the second highest emotion to the users. There are mixed emotions for vaccine tourism, but positive dominates the results. Practical implications: The study attempts to see the global reaction on social media on vaccine tourism trend for giving food for thought to marketers. It can be said that Asians can be the target group. Originality/value: To the best of the authors’ knowledge, there is no study that addresses the new trend of “Vaccine Tourism” or attempts to understand the emotions and sentiments of people globally. © 2021, Emerald Publishing Limited.

11.
Annals of Oncology ; 31:S1201-S1202, 2020.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1384954

ABSTRACT

Background: SARS-CoV-2 is associated with diverse clinical presentations ranging from asymptomatic infection to lethal complications. Small studies have suggested inferior outcomes in patients (pts) on active cancer treatment. This finding was not independently validated in our prior report on 928 pts, which included treatments administered within 4 weeks of COVID-19 diagnosis. Here, we examine outcomes related to systemic cancer treatment within one year of lab-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in an expanded cohort. Method(s): The COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium (CCC19) registry (NCT04354701) was queried for pts ever receiving systemic treatment. Treatment type, cancer type, stage, and COVID-19 outcomes were examined. Pts were stratified by time from last treatment administration: <2 wk, 2-4 wk, 1-3 mo, or 3-12 mo. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) of mortality by treatment type and timing were calculated. Result(s): As of 31 July 2020, we analyzed 3920 pts;42% received systemic anti-cancer treatment within 12 mo (Table). 159 distinct medications were administered. The highest rate of COVID-19-associated complications were observed in pts treated within 1-3 months prior to COVID-19;all-cause mortality in this group was 26%. 30-day mortality by most recent treatment type was 20% for chemotherapy, 18% for immunotherapy, 17% for chemoradiotherapy, 29% for chemoimmunotherapy, 20% for targeted therapy, and 11% for endocrine therapy. SIR of mortality was highest for chemoimmunotherapy or chemotherapy <2 wks, and lowest for endocrine treatments. A high SIR was also found for targeted agents within 3-12 mo. Pts untreated in the year prior to COVID-19 diagnosis had a mortality of 14%. [Formula presented] Conclusion(s): 30-day mortality was highest amongst cancer pts treated 1-3 months prior to COVID-19 diagnosis and those treated with chemoimmunotherapy. Except for endocrine therapy, mortality for subgroups was numerically higher than in pts untreated within a year prior to COVID-19 diagnosis. Clinical trial identification: NCT04354701. Legal entity responsible for the study: The COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium (CCC19). Funding(s): National Cancer Institute (P30 CA068485). Disclosure: T.M. Wise-Draper: Research grant/Funding (self), Travel/Accommodation/Expenses: AstraZeneca;Research grant/Funding (self): BMS;Research grant/Funding (self): Tesaro/GSK;Advisory/Consultancy: Shattuck Labs;Leadership role, Travel/Accommodation/Expenses, HNC POA Lead: Caris Life Sciences;Research grant/Funding (self), Travel/Accommodation/Expenses: Merck;Travel/Accommodation/Expenses: Eli Lilly;Travel/Accommodation/Expenses: Bexion. A. Elkrief: Research grant/Funding (self): AstraZeneca. B.I. Rini: Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self), Travel/Accommodation/Expenses: Merck;Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Roche;Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self), Travel/Accommodation/Expenses: Pfizer;Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): AVEO;Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self), Travel/Accommodation/Expenses: BMS;Advisory/Consultancy: arravive;Advisory/Consultancy: 3D medicines;Advisory/Consultancy: Synthorx;Advisory/Consultancy: Surface Oncology;Shareholder/Stockholder/Stock options: PTC Therapeutics;Research grant/Funding (self): AstraZeneca. D.B. Johnson: Advisory/Consultancy: Array Biopharma;Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): BMS;Advisory/Consultancy: Janssen;Advisory/Consultancy: Merck;Advisory/Consultancy: Novartis;Research grant/Funding (self): Incyte;Leadership role: ASCO melanoma scientific committee chair;Leadership role: NCCN Melanoma committee. G. Lopes: Honoraria (self), Travel/Accommodation/Expenses: Boehringer Ingelheim;Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (institution), Travel/Accommodation/Expenses: Pfizer;Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self), Research grant/Funding (institution): AstraZeneca;Research grant/Funding (institution): Merck;Research grant/Funding (institution): EMD Serono;Research gr

12.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 39(15 SUPPL), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1339268

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients (pts) with cancer have a high risk of venous thromboembolic (VTE) complications, further enhanced by anti-cancer treatments, specifically hormonal therapies, targeted therapies (VEGF inhibitors, other TKIs) and immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs). We hypothesized that high-risk therapies would predispose pts with cancer and COVID-19 to higher risk of VTE complications. Methods: CCC19 is the largest international registry (NCT04354701) recording outcomes of pts with cancer and COVID-19. The registry was queried for hospitalized pts who developed VTE and received systemic cancer treatment in the year prior to COVID-19. Incidence of VTE was analyzed as the primary endpoint;30-day any cause mortality & need for ICU admission at baseline were secondary endpoints in pts with and without VTE respectively. Pts were stratified by treatment type and time from last treatment dose: <2 wk, 2-4 wk, 1-3 months (mos), 3-12 mos. Results: As of February 9th 2021, 4217 hospitalized pts with complications data were present in the registry. 1867 (44%) pts had received systemic anti-cancer therapy within the year prior to COVID-19 and were analyzed. There were a total of 186 (10%) VTE events. Of these, VTE incidence was 141 (10.5%) in pts with solid tumors and 57 (9%) in pts with hematologic malignancies. Overall 30-day mortality was 20% and 22% in pts with and without VTE respectively, while direct admission to ICU at presentation was seen in 17% and 10% of pts with and without VTE, respectively. Treatment timing and drug exposures are below (Table). Receipt of systemic anti-cancer treatment within 3 mos vs 3-12 mos was associated with increased rate of VTE, OR 2.44, 95% CI 1.18-5.84, p=0.011 (univariate Fisher test). Conclusions: We describe the incidence of VTE events in pts with cancer and COVID-19 with recent systemic cancer therapy. ICI and VEGFi were associated with numerically higher rates of VTE;other examined drugs and drug classes were not. Timing of therapy appears to modify risk of VTE. Although retrospective, with possible selection and confounding biases, our analysis suggests that factors other than anticancer drug exposures may drive VTE events in this population.

13.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 39(15 SUPPL), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1339199

ABSTRACT

Background: Oncology patients experience more severe disease outcomes from COVID-19 infection than the general population. BCG is a live bovine tuberculosis bacillus with immunotherapeutic effects in urothelial cancers;it is also used as vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in parts of the world. As BCG vaccination has been associated with broad protection against viral pathogens, BCG exposure through vaccination or intravesical therapy may modulate host immunity and reduce the severity of COVID-19 infection. We report the effect of BCG exposure on COVID-19 severity in oncology patients from the CCC19 registry. Methods: The CCC19 registry (NCT04354701) was used to identify patients with prior BCG exposure. Cohort A received intravesical treatment for bladder carcinoma, and cohort B received prior BCG vaccination. Each cohort was matched 3:1 to non-BCG-exposed controls by age, sex, race, primary cancer type, cancer status, ECOG performance status (PS) and calendar time of COVID-19 infection. The primary endpoint was COVID-19 severity reported on an ordinal scale (uncomplicated, hospitalized, admitted to ICU +/- ventilated, died within 30 days) of patients exposed to prior BCG compared to matched non-exposed controls. 2-sided Wilcoxon ranksum tests were used. Results: As of 6-Feb-2021 we included 124 patients with BCG exposure, 68 patients with bladder carcinoma who had received intravesical BCG (Cohort A), and 64 cancer patients with prior BCG vaccination (Cohort B). Median age was 76 years, IQR 69-83 (Cohort A) and 67 years, IQR 62-74 (Cohort B). Bladder cancer pts were predominately male (78%) vs 55% for Cohort B. Patients with PS 2+ were uncommon, 18% in Cohort A and 16% in Cohort B. COVID-19 illness severity was no different in patients exposed to prior intravesicular BCG (p=0.87). COVID-19 illness severity was no different in patients exposed to prior intradermal BCG vaccination (p=0.60). Conclusions: Despite this being the largest such cohort reported to date, we failed to demonstrate an association of prior BCG exposure with modulation of severity of COVID19 illness. Prospective trials evaluating the protective effect of BCG vaccination are ongoing and will add further insight into the effect of BCG on COVID-19 illness.

14.
Indian Pediatrics ; 15:15, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283169

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus outbreak is a rapidly evolving pandemic, placing unprecedented strain on health-care systems. COVID-19 presents challenges for management of children with renal diseases especially those receiving long-term immunosuppressive medications, including renal transplant recipients and those with chronic kidney disease and acute kidney injury requiring dialysis. Our preparedness for managing this vulnerable group of children is the need of the hour. The purpose of this article is to provide guidance to caregivers and health care personnel involved in management of children with renal diseases and to ensure patient well-being, while protecting staff from infection.

15.
Kidney International Reports ; 6(4):S316-S316, 2021.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1192305
16.
Ann Oncol ; 32(6): 787-800, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1191173

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with cancer may be at high risk of adverse outcomes from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. We analyzed a cohort of patients with cancer and coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) reported to the COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium (CCC19) to identify prognostic clinical factors, including laboratory measurements and anticancer therapies. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with active or historical cancer and a laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis recorded between 17 March and 18 November 2020 were included. The primary outcome was COVID-19 severity measured on an ordinal scale (uncomplicated, hospitalized, admitted to intensive care unit, mechanically ventilated, died within 30 days). Multivariable regression models included demographics, cancer status, anticancer therapy and timing, COVID-19-directed therapies, and laboratory measurements (among hospitalized patients). RESULTS: A total of 4966 patients were included (median age 66 years, 51% female, 50% non-Hispanic white); 2872 (58%) were hospitalized and 695 (14%) died; 61% had cancer that was present, diagnosed, or treated within the year prior to COVID-19 diagnosis. Older age, male sex, obesity, cardiovascular and pulmonary comorbidities, renal disease, diabetes mellitus, non-Hispanic black race, Hispanic ethnicity, worse Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, recent cytotoxic chemotherapy, and hematologic malignancy were associated with higher COVID-19 severity. Among hospitalized patients, low or high absolute lymphocyte count; high absolute neutrophil count; low platelet count; abnormal creatinine; troponin; lactate dehydrogenase; and C-reactive protein were associated with higher COVID-19 severity. Patients diagnosed early in the COVID-19 pandemic (January-April 2020) had worse outcomes than those diagnosed later. Specific anticancer therapies (e.g. R-CHOP, platinum combined with etoposide, and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors) were associated with high 30-day all-cause mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical factors (e.g. older age, hematological malignancy, recent chemotherapy) and laboratory measurements were associated with poor outcomes among patients with cancer and COVID-19. Although further studies are needed, caution may be required in utilizing particular anticancer therapies. CLINICAL TRIAL IDENTIFIER: NCT04354701.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Aged , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Humans , Male , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Advances in Mathematics: Scientific Journal ; 9(8):5611-5619, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-903401

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of novel Corona virus has been stated as a pandemic by World Health Organisation. The World Health Organisation enunciates to all of the countries in the world to continue efforts that have been effective in limiting the number of cases and slow down the spread of the virus. Social distancing has been addressed as the most effective measure of mitigation. In this direction to suppress social contact, India is under a three week lockdown with around 130 crore people urged to stay in their homes. With rigorous travel restrictions along with shutting down of almost all of the non-essential activities there has been observed a drastic reduction in air pollution in all of the major cities. The present study aimed to interpret the dip in air pollution of Delhi. For this analysis, Fuzzy Inference System of MATLAB has been employed. The simulation results shows a drastic fall in air pollutants PM2.5, PM10 and NO2 levels at all of the sampling sites. This study highlights the impact of lockdown on pollution level along with a suggestion to the government to implement a one day lockdown in 3-4 months to put a check on pollution. Mother Nature is expecting from us through present crisis to reciprocate perfectively and positively. © 2020, Research Publication. All rights reserved.

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