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2.
J Obstet Gynaecol ; : 1-7, 2021 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493371

ABSTRACT

Our goal was to address the safety of major gynaecologic cancer surgery without routine preoperative COVID-19 testing in the COVID-19 era. The databases of seven gynaecologic cancer centres were searched in order to identify all consecutive gynaecologic cancer patients undergoing major surgery between March 11, 2020 and May 15, 2020 for this retrospective, case-control study. The case group consisted of patients with histopathologically confirmed gynaecologic cancers, and each case was matched with two counterparts who had undergone primary surgery before the COVID-19 pandemic. The case and the control groups were compared in terms of length of hospital stay, admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), intraoperative and postoperative complications.During the study period, 154 women with gynaecologic cancer undergoing major surgery were identified. Although the case group had more co-morbidities compared to the control group (103/154 vs. 178/308, respectively; p = .04), the median length of hospital stays, the rate of ICU admission, intraoperative complication rates and postoperative complication rates were similar in the two groups. Gynaecologic cancer surgery may be performed safely in the COVID-19 era with similar rates of ICU admission, intraoperative and postoperative complications compared to the patients operated before the COVID-19 pandemic.IMPACT STATEMENTWhat is already known on this subject? Many societies have announced their guidelines about the surgical management of gynaecologic cancer patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, most of them are not evidence-based and mostly on expert opinions.What do the results of this study add? The main findings of this retrospective, case-control study indicate that the short-term (30 day) outcomes of gynaecologic cancer patients undergoing major surgery in the COVID-19 era are similar to those who had been operated before the COVID-19 pandemic. The length of hospital stays, the rates of admission to the ICU, intraoperative and postoperative complications were comparable between women undergoing major gynaecologic cancer surgery in the COVID-19 era and the women who had been operated before the pandemic.What are the implications of these findings for clinical practice and/or further research? We can suggest that definitive surgery may be performed for gynaecologic cancer patients in the COVID-19 era if the resources permit and appropriate precautions such as social distancing, isolation and the use of personal protective equipment are taken.

3.
Arch Gynecol Obstet ; 304(1): 125-130, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023323

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In December 2019, the emerging of a novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has influenced the whole world. The current pandemic also triggers several psychological changes. Uncertainties and changes in health practices may cause anxiety, depression, and concerns on vulnerable populations such as pregnant. This study aims to survey the pregnant women to capture the psychological impact and perceptions during the pandemic. METHODS: A total of 297 pregnant women aged ≥ 18 years were enrolled in May 2020. We evaluated the hard-copy survey included questions about demographic and clinical information of patients, 95% confidence intervals of a COVID-19-related questionnaire in a Likert scale and 14-item Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). RESULTS: A total of 297 pregnant women were included in this study with a mean age of 27.64. Most patients (82.5%) had concerns about infecting their babies during delivery. The fear of infection of the fetus during delivery revealed elderly age and having anxiety as the unique significant risk factors. Mean HADS-A and HADS-D scores were 7.94 (± 4.03) and 7.23 (± 3.84), respectively. Multivariate analysis showed having anxiety was associated with a high HADS-D score and concern about the inability to reach obstetrician, and being in advanced age, having a high HADS-A score, and concern about the inability to reach obstetrician demonstrated significant effects on HADS-D score. CONCLUSION: We conclude that in future pandemics, communications and reassurance of the patients should be prioritized upon their routine ante-natal care to avoid increased levels of anxiety and even depression.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Fear/psychology , Pandemics , Pregnant Women/psychology , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pregnancy , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Cancer Med ; 10(1): 208-219, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-932418

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on European gynaecological cancer patients under active treatment or follow-up has not been documented. We sought to capture the patient perceptions of the COVID-19 implications and the worldwide imposed treatment modifications. METHODS: A patient survey was conducted in 16 European countries, using a new COVID-19-related questionnaire, developed by ENGAGe and the Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale questionnaire (HADS). The survey was promoted by national patient advocacy groups and charitable organisations. FINDINGS: We collected 1388 forms; 592 online and 796 hard-copy (May, 2020). We excluded 137 due to missing data. Median patients' age was 55 years (range: 18-89), 54.7% had ovarian cancer and 15.5% were preoperative. Even though 73.2% of patients named cancer as a risk factor for COVID-19, only 17.5% were more afraid of COVID-19 than their cancer condition, with advanced age (>70 years) as the only significant risk factor for that. Overall, 71% were concerned about cancer progression if their treatment/follow-up was cancelled/postponed. Most patients (64%) had their care continued as planned, but 72.3% (n = 892) said that they received no information around overall COVID-19 infection rates of patients and staff, testing or measures taken in their treating hospital. Mean HADS Anxiety and Depression Scores were 8.8 (range: 5.3-12) and 8.1 (range: 3.8-13.4), respectively. Multivariate analysis identified high HADS-depression scores, having experienced modifications of care due to the pandemic and concern about not being able to visit their doctor as independent predictors of patients' anxiety. INTERPRETATION: Gynaecological cancer patients expressed significant anxiety about progression of their disease due to modifications of care related to the COVID-19 pandemic and wished to pursue their treatment as planned despite the associated risks. Healthcare professionals should take this into consideration when making decisions that impact patients care in times of crisis and to develop initiatives to improve patients' communication and education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Genital Neoplasms, Female/psychology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Depression/psychology , Europe , Fear/psychology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Young Adult
6.
Int J Cancer ; 148(2): 277-284, 2021 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-635339

ABSTRACT

The age-standardised incidence of cervical cancer in Europe varies widely by country (between 3 and 25/100000 women-years) in 2018. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage is low in countries with the highest incidence and screening performance is heterogeneous among European countries. A broad group of delegates of scientific professional societies and cancer organisations endorse the principles of the WHO call to eliminate cervical cancer as a public health problem, also in Europe. All European nations should, by 2030, reach at least 90% HPV vaccine coverage among girls by the age of 15 years and also boys, if cost-effective; they should introduce organised population-based HPV-based screening and achieve 70% of screening coverage in the target age group, providing also HPV testing on self-samples for nonscreened or underscreened women; and to manage 90% of screen-positive women. To guide member states, a group of scientific professional societies and cancer organisations engage to assist in the rollout of a series of concerted evidence-based actions. European health authorities are requested to mandate a group of experts to develop the third edition of European Guidelines for Quality Assurance of Cervical Cancer prevention based on integrated HPV vaccination and screening and to monitor the progress towards the elimination goal. The occurrence of the COVID-19 pandemic, having interrupted prevention activities temporarily, should not deviate stakeholders from this ambition. In the immediate postepidemic phase, health professionals should focus on high-risk women and adhere to cost-effective policies including self-sampling.


Subject(s)
Alphapapillomavirus/immunology , Papillomavirus Infections/immunology , Papillomavirus Vaccines/immunology , Public Health/methods , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , Alphapapillomavirus/physiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Early Detection of Cancer , Europe , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Infections/virology , Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration & dosage , Public Health/standards , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/immunology , Vaccination/methods , World Health Organization , Young Adult
8.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 30(8): 1097-1100, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-505825
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