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1.
Advances in Human Biology ; 12(2):144-150, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2155507

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The most effective preventive measures against COVID-19 among health-care personnel (HCP) are personal protective equipment (PPE) and hand hygiene. The documented side effects of continuous use of mask or PPE are dermatitis, but side effects on the Eustachian tube are untouched areas. The aim of this study was to investigate the Eustachian tube dysfunctions among HCP due to the continuous use of masks. Materials and Methods: This web-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 217 eligible HCP. The sample size was calculated as 97, considering the unknown prevalence of Eustachian tube dysfunctions among HCP (50%), so all HCP were included in the study. A structured questionnaire with close-ended responses was developed to collect study participants' responses. Results: Out of 217 participants, only 207 participants provided their written consent after understanding the study objectives and 206 were included in the analysis as one subject has pre-existing ear disease. The daily hours of mask usage among 52.4% of participants were between 4 and 8 h. About 2.6% of doctors experienced severe pain and pressure in the ear. Eustachian Tube Dysfunction Patient Questionnaire-7 score was significantly higher among females and masked usage of four or more hours (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The present study revealed that 42.3% of participants had Eustachian tube dysfunctions. The study findings might help local administration to provide practical recommendations for medical workers prior head supported masks instead of ear-supported masks, use of ear protectors.

2.
2nd Asian Conference on Innovation in Technology, ASIANCON 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2136102

ABSTRACT

Video conferencing software has become an essential tool for communicating with one another across long distances. There are several video conferencing software that are utilised for communication all over the world. Huge numbers of people are unable to interact via spoken language and find typical video conferencing solutions difficult to use. Our project intends to solve this problem by creating a user-friendly Video Conferencing App that can identify sign language in real time and provide correct subtitles. Due to a lack of communication skills, deaf and hard of hearing persons confront several obstacles in their everyday lives. The covid epidemic has made traditional ways of communication extremely challenging for these people. Our goal is to bridge the gap by giving them a platform to showcase their skills. © 2022 IEEE.

3.
Pediatric Hematology Oncology Journal ; 7(4):S14, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed Central | ID: covidwho-2132067
4.
Medical Mycology ; 60(SUPP 1):182-182, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2123113
5.
Applications of Advanced Optimization Techniques in Industrial Engineering ; : 181-190, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2079586

ABSTRACT

The deadly coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been spreading vigorously and has led to a global crisis, with its spread to more than 220 countries and territories. About 153, 504, 608 confirmed cases of the coronavirus COVID-19 that originated from Wuhan, China, and a death toll of 3, 216, 577 deaths as on 3 May 2021. At the time of writing, India is the worst affected country by COVID-19 and the death ratio is increasing day by day. To date we have more than four vaccines available, but social distancing has been identified as the best way to overcome and fight against this disease. In order to ensure social distancing protocols in overcrowded places and workplace, this tool can monitor whether or not people are ensuring a safe distancing protocol from each other by analyzing real-time video streams with the help of a constant camera feed. To keep track of people in various workplaces, factories, and shops we can use this tool to their security camera systems and can monitor whether or not people are keeping a secured distance from one another. This chapter proposes a Machine Learning and Python-based framework for monitoring social distancing using surveillance video with the help of a camera. In this proposed framework, we are utilizing the YOLO v3, an object detection model for separating the foreground details from the background details and OpenCV for tracking the humans by using the bounded boxes and assigning IDs to them. © 2022 selection and editorial matter, Abhinav Goel, Anand Chauhan and A.K. Malik.

6.
Tran, K. B.; Lang, J. J.; Compton, K.; Xu, R. X.; Acheson, A. R.; Henrikson, H. J.; Kocarnik, J. M.; Penberthy, L.; Aali, A.; Abbas, Q.; Abbasi, B.; Abbasi-Kangevari, M.; Abbasi-Kangevari, Z.; Abbastabar, H.; Abdelmasseh, M.; Abd-Elsalam, S.; Abdelwahab, A. A.; Abdoli, G.; Abdulkadir, H. A.; Abedi, A.; Abegaz, K. H.; Abidi, H.; Aboagye, R. G.; Abolhassani, H.; Absalan, A.; Abtew, Y. D.; Ali, H. A.; Abu-Gharbieh, E.; Achappa, B.; Acuna, J. M.; Addison, D.; Addo, I. Y.; Adegboye, O. A.; Adesina, M. A.; Adnan, M.; Adnani, Q. E. S.; Advani, S. M.; Afrin, S.; Afzal, M. S.; Aggarwal, M.; Ahinkorah, B. O.; Ahmad, A. R.; Ahmad, R.; Ahmad, S.; Ahmadi, S.; Ahmed, H.; Ahmed, L. A.; Ahmed, M. B.; Rashid, T. A.; Aiman, W.; Ajami, M.; Akalu, G. T.; Akbarzadeh-Khiavi, M.; Aklilu, A.; Akonde, M.; Akunna, C. J.; Al Hamad, H.; Alahdab, F.; Alanezi, F. M.; Alanzi, T. M.; Alessy, S. A.; Algammal, A. M.; Al-Hanawi, M. K.; Alhassan, R. K.; Ali, B. A.; Ali, L.; Ali, S. S.; Alimohamadi, Y.; Alipour, V.; Aljunid, S. M.; Alkhayyat, M.; Al-Maweri, S. A. A.; Almustanyir, S.; Alonso, N.; Alqalyoobi, S.; Al-Raddadi, R. M.; Al-Rifai, R. H. H.; Al-Sabah, S. K.; Al-Tammemi, A. B.; Altawalah, H.; Alvis-Guzman, N.; Amare, F.; Ameyaw, E. K.; Dehkordi, J. J. A.; Amirzade-Iranaq, M. H.; Amu, H.; Amusa, G. A.; Ancuceanu, R.; Anderson, J. A.; Animut, Y. A.; Anoushiravani, A.; Anoushirvani, A. A.; Ansari-Moghaddam, A.; Ansha, M. G.; Antony, B.; Antwi, M. H.; Anwar, S. L.; Anwer, R.; Anyasodor, A. E.; Arabloo, J.; Arab-Zozani, M.; Aremu, O.; Argaw, A. M.; Ariffin, H.; Aripov, T.; Arshad, M.; Al, Artaman, Arulappan, J.; Aruleba, R. T.; Aryannejad, A.; Asaad, M.; Asemahagn, M. A.; Asemi, Z.; Asghari-Jafarabadi, M.; Ashraf, T.; Assadi, R.; Athar, M.; Athari, S. S.; Null, Mmwa, Attia, S.; Aujayeb, A.; Ausloos, M.; Avila-Burgos, L.; Awedew, A. F.; Awoke, M. A.; Awoke, T.; Quintanilla, B. P. A.; Ayana, T. M.; Ayen, S. S.; Azadi, D.; Null, S. A.; Azami-Aghdash, S.; Azanaw, M. M.; Azangou-Khyavy, M.; Jafari, A. A.; Azizi, H.; Azzam, A. Y. Y.; Babajani, A.; Badar, M.; Badiye, A. D.; Baghcheghi, N.; Bagheri, N.; Bagherieh, S.; Bahadory, S.; Baig, A. A.; Baker, J. L.; Bakhtiari, A.; Bakshi, R. K.; Banach, M.; Banerjee, I.; Bardhan, M.; Barone-Adesi, F.; Barra, F.; Barrow, A.; Bashir, N. Z.; Bashiri, A.; Basu, S.; Batiha, A. M. M.; Begum, A.; Bekele, A. B.; Belay, A. S.; Belete, M. A.; Belgaumi, U. I.; Bell, A. W.; Belo, L.; Benzian, H.; Berhie, A. Y.; Bermudez, A. N. C.; Bernabe, E.; Bhagavathula, A. S.; Bhala, N.; Bhandari, B. B.; Bhardwaj, N.; Bhardwaj, P.; Bhattacharyya, K.; Bhojaraja, V. S.; Bhuyan, S. S.; Bibi, S.; Bilchut, A. H.; Bintoro, B. S.; Biondi, A.; Birega, M. G. B.; Birhan, H. E.; Bjorge, T.; Blyuss, O.; Bodicha, B. B. A.; Bolla, S. R.; Boloor, A.; Bosetti, C.; Braithwaite, D.; Brauer, M.; Brenner, H.; Briko, A. N.; Briko, N. I.; Buchanan, C. M.; Bulamu, N. B.; Bustamante-Teixeira, M. T.; Butt, M. H.; Butt, N. S.; Butt, Z. A.; dos Santos, F. L. C.; Camera, L. A.; Cao, C.; Cao, Y.; Carreras, G.; Carvalho, M.; Cembranel, F.; Cerin, E.; Chakraborty, P. A.; Charalampous, P.; Chattu, V. K.; Chimed-Ochir, O.; Chirinos-Caceres, J. L.; Cho, D. Y.; Cho, W. C. S.; Christopher, D. J.; Chu, D. T.; Chukwu, I. S.; Cohen, A. J.; Conde, J.; Cortas, S.; Costa, V. M.; Cruz-Martins, N.; Culbreth, G. T.; Dadras, O.; Dagnaw, F. T.; Dahlawi, S. M. A.; Dai, X. C.; Dandona, L.; Dandona, R.; Daneshpajouhnejad, P.; Danielewicz, A.; Dao, A. T. M.; Soltani, R. D. C.; Darwesh, A. M.; Das, S.; Davitoiu, D. V.; Esmaeili, E. D.; De la Hoz, F. P.; Debela, S. A.; Dehghan, A.; Demisse, B.; Demisse, F. W.; Denova-Gutierrez, E.; Derakhshani, A.; Molla, M. D.; Dereje, D.; Deribe, K. S.; Desai, R.; Desalegn, M. D.; Dessalegn, F. N.; Dessalegni, S. A. A.; Dessie, G.; Desta, A. A.; Dewan, S. M. R.; Dharmaratne, S. D.; Dhimal, M.; Dianatinasab, M.; Diao, N.; Diaz, D.; Digesa, L. E.; Dixit, S. G.; Doaei, S.; Doan, L. P.; Doku, P. N.; Dongarwar, D.; dos Santos, W. M.; Driscoll, T. R.; Dsouza, H. L.; Durojaiye, O. C.; Edalati, S.; Eghbalian, F.; Ehsani-Chimeh, E.; Eini, E.; Ekholuenetale, M.; Ekundayo, T. C.; Ekwueme, D. U.; El Tantawi, M.; Elbahnasawy, M. A.; Elbarazi, I.; Elghazaly, H.; Elhadi, M.; El-Huneidi, W.; Emamian, M. H.; Bain, L. E.; Enyew, D. B.; Erkhembayar, R.; Eshetu, T.; Eshrati, B.; Eskandarieh, S.; Espinosa-Montero, J.; Etaee, F.; Etemadimanesh, A.; Eyayu, T.; Ezeonwumelu, I. J.; Ezzikouri, S.; Fagbamigbe, A. F.; Fahimi, S.; Fakhradiyev, I. R.; Faraon, E. J. A.; Fares, J.; Farmany, A.; Farooque, U.; Farrokhpour, H.; Fasanmi, A. O.; Fatehizadeh, A.; Fatima, W.; Fattahi, H.; Fekadu, G.; Feleke, B. E.; Ferrari, A. A.; Ferrero, S.; Desideri, L. F.; Filip, I.; Fischer, F.; Foroumadi, R.; Foroutan, M.; Fukumoto, T.; Gaal, P. A.; Gad, M. M.; Gadanya, M. A.; Gaipov, A.; Galehdar, N.; Gallus, S.; Garg, T.; Fonseca, M. G.; Gebremariam, Y. H.; Gebremeskel, T. G.; Gebremichael, M. A.; Geda, Y. F.; Gela, Y. Y.; Gemeda, B. N. B.; Getachew, M.; Getachew, M. E.; Ghaffari, K.; Ghafourifard, M.; Ghamari, S. H.; Nour, M. G.; Ghassemi, F.; Ghimire, A.; Ghith, N.; Gholamalizadeh, M.; Navashenaq, J. G.; Ghozy, S.; Gilani, S. A.; Gill, P. S.; Ginindza, T. G.; Gizaw, A. T. T.; Glasbey, J. C.; Godos, J.; Goel, A.; Golechha, M.; Goleij, P.; Golinelli, D.; Golitaleb, M.; Gorini, G.; Goulart, B. N. G.; Grosso, G.; Guadie, H. A.; Gubari, M. I. M.; Gudayu, T. W.; Guerra, M. R.; Gunawardane, D. A.; Gupta, B.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, V.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurara, M. K.; Guta, A.; Habibzadeh, P.; Avval, A. H.; Hafezi-Nejad, N.; Ali, A. H.; Haj-Mirzaian, A.; Halboub, E. S.; Halimi, A.; Halwani, R.; Hamadeh, R. R.; Hameed, S.; Hamidi, S.; Hanif, A.; Hariri, S.; Harlianto, N. I.; Haro, J. M.; Hartono, R. K.; Hasaballah, A. I.; Hasan, S. M. M.; Hasani, H.; Hashemi, S. M.; Hassan, A. M.; Hassanipour, S.; Hayat, K.; Heidari, G.; Heidari, M.; Heidarymeybodi, Z.; Herrera-Serna, B. Y.; Herteliu, C.; Hezam, K.; Hiraike, Y.; Hlongwa, M. M.; Holla, R.; Holm, M.; Horita, N.; Hoseini, M.; Hossain, M. M.; Hossain, M. B. H.; Hosseini, M. S.; Hosseinzadeh, A.; Hosseinzadeh, M.; Hostiuc, M.; Hostiuc, S.; Househ, M.; Huang, J. J.; Hugo, F. N.; Humayun, A.; Hussain, S.; Hussein, N. R.; Hwang, B. F.; Ibitoye, S. E.; Iftikhar, P. M.; Ikuta, K. S.; Ilesanmi, O. S.; Ilic, I. M.; Ilic, M. D.; Immurana, M.; Innos, K.; Iranpour, P.; Irham, L. M.; Islam, M. S.; Islam, R. M.; Islami, F.; Ismail, N. E.; Isola, G.; Iwagami, M.; Merin, J. L.; Jaiswal, A.; Jakovljevic, M.; Jalili, M.; Jalilian, S.; Jamshidi, E.; Jang, S. I.; Jani, C. T.; Javaheri, T.; Jayarajah, U. U.; Jayaram, S.; Jazayeri, S. B.; Jebai, R.; Jemal, B.; Jeong, W.; Jha, R. P.; Jindal, H. A.; John-Akinola, Y. O.; Jonas, J. B.; Joo, T.; Joseph, N.; Joukar, F.; Jozwiak, J. J.; Jarisson, M.; Kabir, A.; Kacimi, S. E. O.; Kadashetti, V.; Kahe, F.; Kakodkar, P. V.; Kalankesh, L. R.; Kalhor, R.; Kamal, V. K.; Kamangar, F.; Kamath, A.; Kanchan, T.; Kandaswamy, E.; Kandel, H.; Kang, H.; Kanno, G. G.; Kapoor, N.; Kar, S. S.; Karanth, S. D.; Karaye, I. M.; Karch, A.; Karimi, A.; Kassa, B. G.; Katoto, Pdmc, Kauppila, J. H.; Kaur, H.; Kebede, A. G.; Keikavoosi-Arani, L.; Kejela, G. G.; Bohan, P. M. K.; Keramati, M.; Keykhaei, M.; Khajuria, H.; Khan, A.; Khan, A. A. K.; Khan, E. A.; Khan, G.; Khan, M. N.; Ab Khan, M.; Khanali, J.; Khatab, K.; Khatatbeh, M. M.; Khatib, M. N.; Khayamzadeh, M.; Kashani, H. R. K.; Tabari, M. A. K.; et al..
Lancet ; 400(10352):563-591, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2068419

ABSTRACT

Background Understanding the magnitude of cancer burden attributable to potentially modifiable risk factors is crucial for development of effective prevention and mitigation strategies. We analysed results from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) 2019 to inform cancer control planning efforts globally. Methods The GBD 2019 comparative risk assessment framework was used to estimate cancer burden attributable to behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risk factors. A total of 82 risk-outcome pairs were included on the basis of the World Cancer Research Fund criteria. Estimated cancer deaths and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) in 2019 and change in these measures between 2010 and 2019 are presented. Findings Globally, in 2019, the risk factors included in this analysis accounted for 4.45 million (95% uncertainty interval 4.01-4.94) deaths and 105 million (95.0-116) DALYs for both sexes combined, representing 44.4% (41.3-48.4) of all cancer deaths and 42.0% (39.1-45.6) of all DALYs. There were 2.88 million (2.60-3.18) risk-attributable cancer deaths in males (50.6% [47.8-54.1] of all male cancer deaths) and 1.58 million (1.36-1.84) risk-attributable cancer deaths in females (36.3% [32.5-41.3] of all female cancer deaths). The leading risk factors at the most detailed level globally for risk-attributable cancer deaths and DALYs in 2019 for both sexes combined were smoking, followed by alcohol use and high BMI. Risk-attributable cancer burden varied by world region and Socio-demographic Index (SDI), with smoking, unsafe sex, and alcohol use being the three leading risk factors for risk-attributable cancer DALYs in low SDI locations in 2019, whereas DALYs in high SDI locations mirrored the top three global risk factor rankings. From 2010 to 2019, global risk-attributable cancer deaths increased by 20.4% (12.6-28.4) and DALYs by 16.8% (8.8-25.0), with the greatest percentage increase in metabolic risks (34.7% [27.9-42.8] and 33.3% [25.8-42.0]). Interpretation The leading risk factors contributing to global cancer burden in 2019 were behavioural, whereas metabolic risk factors saw the largest increases between 2010 and 2019. Reducing exposure to these modifiable risk factors would decrease cancer mortality and DALY rates worldwide, and policies should be tailored appropriately to local cancer risk factor burden. Copyright (C) 2022 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY 4.0 license.

7.
RNA Technologies ; 13:41-71, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2059695

ABSTRACT

Last decade has witnessed tremendous growth in the new promising treatment options based on mRNA, RNAi, antisense RNA, and RNA aptamers, the four classes of RNA-based therapeutics. Among these, mRNA-based therapy is centered on producing proteins within the cells to supplant deficient or abnormal proteins and in vaccination to a target pathogen. The potential of mRNA therapeutics is evident from the two major mRNA vaccines approved for COVID-19: developed by Moderna and by Pfizer. Nonetheless, mRNA therapeutic potential extends far beyond this, such as in treating genetic diseases, cancers, and other infectious diseases. Given the potential of mRNA therapeutics, this chapter is written to provide the reader an insight into the features of several synthetic mRNA platforms, production, purification;strategies to increase the stability and reduce the immunogenicity of therapeutic mRNA molecules;delivery methods of these mRNAs in vivo;and their applications, safety, and efficacy. Graphical : A detailed diagram of the chemically modified mRNA, with the in vitro delivery modes on the left, and the myriad of applications, namely the treatment of major genetic diseases on the right. The IVT mRNA is represented with more details above the diagram. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

8.
Management of Tourism Ecosystem Services in a Post Pandemic Context: Global Perspectives ; : 193-208, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2055957
9.
Med Mycol ; 60(Suppl 1), 2022.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-2042616

ABSTRACT

 : Poster session 2, September 22, 2022, 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM Objectives: Aspergillus is a ubiquitous fungus in the Indian environment. Spores are constantly circulating in hospital and community environments alike. Infections like COVID-19 which affect not only innate immune system but also lead to local immune-compromization especially in the respiratory system make the patient vulnerable to infections like Aspergillosis. Hereby, we present the prevalence of Aspergillus infection in a tertiary care center over a period of 1 year with special reference to co-infections with COVID-19 as Aspergillosis or mixed infection (Aspergillosis and Mucormycosis).Material and Methods: All the samples which were submitted to Mycology laboratory during the time period of 1 year from January 2021 to December 2021 were included in the study. The samples were processed as per the standard mycological techniques for direct examination and culture. Those patients which had direct KOH mount positive for septate hyphae and grew Aspergillus on culture were included for the purpose of this study. Records of Aspergillosis patients who were positive for COVID-19 too were assessed to look for significant associating factors. Results: Out of a total of 6863 samples, 66 samples came out to be positive for Aspergillus sp. Out of which, 55 were identified phenotypically as A. flavus, 3 A. fumigatus, 2 A. terreus and 1 was A. niger. In five of the strains, species could not be identified even phenotypically and were reported as Aspergillus sp. Maximum isolates (43) were from nasal and paranasal sinuses (sinus discharge, nasal tissue, nasal polyp, nasal muck, nasal crust, maxillary meatus etc) 16 were pulmonary samples (sputum, tracheal aspirate, bronchoalveolar lavage, pleural fluid, lung tissue), two were corneal scrapings, two samples were dental tissue and palatal necrosed material and two were nail samples. One sample was from a patient with ear discharge. A total of 15 patients had COVID-19 infection at the time of diagnosis or within 3 months prior. In all, 12 patients had co-infections of Aspergillus and Mucormycetes (9 being COVID positive too), and 2 patients had co-infection of Aspergillus and Candida. Records of COVID-19 patients revealed that all 12 patients with co-infection of Aspergillus and Mucormycetes were treated as per guidelines for Mucormycetes infection. Out of other three, two were confirmed CAPA as per the criteria. One patient was treated for COVID-19 infection only. Conclusion: Mucormycosis was another infection during COVID-19 times, which was like a huge wave, sweeping all attention. Rather Aspergillus infections got shadowed by mucormycosis despite the fact that during COVID-19 times, as many as 15% of cases were found to be positive for Aspergillosis in COVID-19 positive patients, especially in ICU areas. In the times to come, it is speculated that sequelae of Aspergillus infections may be seen among COVID-19 patients. Emerging drug resistance among Aspergilli can worsen the situation further.

10.
JMS - Journal of Medical Society ; 36(1):11-17, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2030165

ABSTRACT

Background: With the emergence of highly infectious epidemics/pandemics, such as Ebola virus diseases, severe acute respiratory syndrome, and coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), doctors are at much greater risk of infection due to the exposure to the highly infectious bodily fluids and droplet nuclei. Hence, treating and caring for patients need the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) to reduce the transmission risk. Objectives: The present study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of skin injury and its type due to PPE usage, to find the association of related factors with the skin injuries among doctors. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted after obtaining the institutional ethical approval in dedicated COVID-19 hospital for a period of 4 months among 132 doctors wearing grades 2 and 3 PPE kit using a questionnaire collecting the details regarding baseline, duty, skin injury characterization. During analysis of data, an association between variables was significant for P < 0.05. Results: It was observed that 17.1% of doctors were wearing the PPE kit for 5 or more hours/and 13.0% of subjects reported absenteeism from duty hours due to PPE-induced skin injuries. 76.4% of subjects have suffered from skin injury after PPE usage. The most common symptoms/signs for the skin injury occurred was indentation and pain on back of ears (61.0%). Conclusion: The skin injuries of PPE among the doctors may result in reduced morale for overloaded work and made them anxious. Hence, an appropriate monitoring of these adverse effects should be done and effective preventive measures should be adopted. © 2022 Journal of Medical Society ;Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow.

11.
Medical Journal of Dr. D.Y. Patil Vidyapeeth ; 15(7):S3-S7, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2024857

ABSTRACT

Rapid antigen test has a very important value as one of tools to address the Covid pandemic. Though this test is not as accurate as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing. As viral antigen appears before antibody formation in infected person. It is a specific marker of virus. Therefore, for detection of this highly infectious disease at an early stage, viral antigen testing can be a useful strategy in scenario of community transmission to prevent further spread. In India an advisory was issued by ICMR (on 14th June 2020) regarding usage of RAT for quick detection of COVID-19 positive patients. During second wave, Rapid antigen testing was advised only in symptomatic individuals and immediate contacts of laboratory confirmed positive cases. Though no test is perfect when it comes to the attributes of accuracy, accessibility, affordability, and timeliness of results. However, Rapid antigen test can be used as a useful test in public health that can benefit the larger population in breaking the chain of transmission if used wisely in different settings and according to the timeline of symptoms. © Medical Journal of Dr. D.Y. Patil Vidyapeeth 2022.

12.
3rd International Conference on Intelligent Engineering and Management, ICIEM 2022 ; : 632-635, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2018837

ABSTRACT

Predicting the coronavirus is divided into several parts in this research report, including a state-by-state analysis [2], that includes active, total, cured, and death cases, as well as a daily increase in cases that includes India confirmed, death, and recovered cases. This also includes a thread of new coronavirus cases and forecasts how an outbreak will play out in the next days. This model is implemented using Anaconda navigator and Kaggle, an open-source platform. We utilize Kaggle to forecast time series data in order to predict the virus outbreak. Anaconda Navigator is a free online cloud that gives us with a Jupyter notebook environment that is suited for machine learning ideas. Support Machine learning concepts such as Vector Machine, Regression, and Data Visualization are applied to improve the outcomes of the research. This model includes all available data on the virus's transmission, including total, new, and active cases, as well as forecasting future outbreaks and a weekly epidemic research. © 2022 IEEE.

13.
3rd International Conference on Intelligent Engineering and Management, ICIEM 2022 ; : 437-441, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2018832

ABSTRACT

Face Mask Detection program developed by OpenCV, Keras / Tensor Flow uses Deep Learning ideas and laptop Vision to detect face masks on continuous still images such as video streaming. Within the gift situation thanks to COVID-19, there are no requests for the acquisition of a mask to save the area that is currently in dire need of transport, crowded areas, accommodations, major manufacturers and various businesses to guarantee the safety. Also, lack of big image data with a mask has made this task even more difficult and difficult. Following the outbreak of the global COVID-19 epidemic, there was an urgent need for preventive measures, with a mask on the face. The primary purpose of the project is to determine whether there is a face mask on people's faces in video and photos streamed live. We used the depth of learning to build our face detection model. The features used for object detection are the Single shot detector (SSD) due to its performance with precision and high speed. Apart from this, we used basic concepts to transfer learning to neural networks without ultimately excluding the presence or absence of facial image in a photo or video stream. Test results show that our model works at 100% efficiency with 99% accuracy of test and memory, respectively. Our mask detector did not use any data from the inserted images. The model is accurate, and as we are accustomed to using the design of MobileNetV2, savings are calculated collaboratively and therefore make it a lot easier to move the model to embedded programs like Google Coral & Raspberry Pi etc. This program will be used for time programs that require the acquisition of face masks for security operations due to the emergence of COVID-19. The project is used with the installed plans for use at airports, train stations, offices, school premises and marketplaces to ensure that the local unit of community safety tips is followed. © 2022 IEEE.

14.
1st International Conference on Computational Intelligence and Sustainable Engineering Solution, CISES 2022 ; : 459-464, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2018638

ABSTRACT

The Online Blood Donation Management System, the purpose of which is to act as a bridge between a person who needs blood, a patient, and a blood donor. The design of an automatic blood system has become an integral part for saving the human lives, who need the blood under different situations. Since, there are various drawbacks of the pre-existing system like privacy issues for the donors, which are getting reflected directly on the interface. Thus, we have designed a robust system that will create a connection between different hospitals, NGOs, and blood banks to help the patient in any difficult situation. Thus, HIPPA model provides a backbone for security breaches The interface designed will be easy-to-use and easy to access and will be a fast, efficient, and reliable way to get lifesaving blood, totally free of charge. Apart from this the visualization of the data is present along with the one extra COVID module, which will help covid and normal patients for plasma donation. The main aim of the paper is to reduce the complications of finding a blood donor during panic situations and provide a high level of security for the donors. © 2022 IEEE.

15.
Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine ; 26:S84, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2006372

ABSTRACT

Cytomegalovirus infection is a common occurrence in the immunocompromised host and can affect any organ of the human body. Clinical presentation is extremely variable and nonspecific, which makes diagnosis difficult. Post COVID patients are immunocompromised due to viral infection, uncontrolled diabetes, poor nutrition, hyper-catabolic state, and use of immunosuppressive drugs like steroids and tocilizumab. We are presenting a clinical spectrum of seven post COVID patients who were readmitted to the hospital with variable clinical spectrums. Early suspicion and appropriate pharmacological interventions were necessary to make the right diagnosis and achieve a positive outcome. Materials and methods: This is a retrospective analysis of seven post COVID patients admitted in our hospital since 15th January to 1 August 2021. All post COVID patients were investigated and only those were positive by PCR and serology for CMV was analyzed. Results: All seven patients were previously treated in hospital for severe COVID associated pneumonia and readmitted with various CMV related complications. Three out of seven patients died and four survived. All patients were having multisystem involvement with predominantly affected respiratory system in the form of pneumonia and reappearance of ground glass lesions in HRCT and increased demand of oxygen. Conclusion: CMV-associated complications are underdiagnosed in post COVID patients and this is one of the etiologies of re-hospitalization of such patients. Clinical spectrum is wide and nonspecific therefore strong clinical suspicion and early investigation can provide an opportunity for optimal therapeutic intervention for the suffering patient.

16.
2021 Ieee Biomedical Circuits and Systems Conference (Ieee Biocas 2021) ; 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2005093

ABSTRACT

The whole world is under the influence of the novel Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), which hit hard most of the developed and developing countries, leading to the death of millions of people around the world. This disease majorly affects the respiratory tract, which can progress to more severe or potentially deadly conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or hypoxemia, owing to widespread inflammation of the lungs. Conventionally used ventilator devices are quite expensive and require trained staff for its smooth operation. Generally, in developing countries these types of ventilators are limited in numbers and available only at multispecialty hospitals. So as to tackle and fulfill the urgent need of ventilators, we come up with a device which is a low-cost, easy to assemble, portable automated AMBU resuscitator system, that can be easily scaled, to fight the ongoing pandemic. The device provides precise control over various ventilation parameters, such as PEEP, peak pressure, tidal volume, I/E, BPM, while operating in pressure mode.

17.
Pediatrics ; 149, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2003152

ABSTRACT

Purpose/Objectives: Bronchiolitis is the most common cause of lower respiratory infections in young children. Studies have demonstrated that improved adherence to an evidenced-based clinical pathway is associated with shorter lengths of stay and lower costs. Despite having a bronchiolitis clinical pathway, the average length of stay of bronchiolitis patients at our tertiary care center was higher than published data showing a national average around 2.5 days. The specific aim of this project was to decrease the average length of stay of patients aged 0-24 months who are admitted with bronchiolitis from a baseline of 2.9 days during the 2019-2020 bronchiolitis season to a goal of 2.5 days by the end of the season in March 2021. Design/Methods: A multidisciplinary task group including hospitalists, respiratory therapy, and nursing was organized to revise and update our current bronchiolitis pathway, protocol, and electronic medical record (EMR) order set. Using a data report tool that was built by IT and linked to our EMR, real time institutional data was obtained and reviewed monthly. Staff feedback was solicited leading to the identification and implementation of the following interventions which were implemented in November 2020: • Decreasing the oxygen saturation goal to 88% for initiating oxygen and for admission and discharge criteria • Improving patient education by updating family education handouts and developing standardized discharge instructions • Adding nursing communication and activatable discharge orders that list the discharge criteria Our primary outcome measure was the monthly average length of stay of admitted bronchiolitis patients. Our process measure was the utilization rate of our bronchiolitis order set. Our balancing measures were the number of intensive care unit (ICU) transfers and the 7-day readmission rate to the hospital and emergency department (ED). Results: We observed the average length of stay during the period of November 2019-March 2020 decreased from 2.9 days to 1.7 days during the November 2020- March 2021 time period (Figure 1). The order set utilization rate during these periods remained high, but decreased somewhat from 85% to 70%. Balancing measures during these periods showed a decrease in ICU transfer rate from 4.76% to 0% and a decrease in the ED/Inpatient readmission rate from 2.45% to 0% (Figure 2). Conclusion/Discussion: The revision of the bronchiolitis clinical pathway coupled with caregiver and family education correlated with a significant reduction in the length of stay of admitted bronchiolitis patients at our tertiary care hospital. However, the coronavirus pandemic drastically reduced the volume of bronchiolitis patients in the 2020-2021 season, with our hospital experiencing a 93% decrease in admissions for this diagnosis. While this project's results are highly encouraging, the coronavirus pandemic and low admission numbers make drawing clear conclusions difficult, and ongoing monitoring will be essential to see if this trend is sustainable.

18.
Lecture Notes on Data Engineering and Communications Technologies ; 132:399-408, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1990586

ABSTRACT

Due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) cases growing rapidly, the effective screening of infected patients is becoming a necessity. One such way is through chest radiography. With the high stakes of false negatives being potential cause of innumerable more cases, expert opinions on x-rays are high in demand. In this scenario, Deep Learning and Machine Learning techniques offer fast and effective ways of detecting abnormalities in chest x-rays and can help in identifying patients affected by COVID-19. In this paper, we did comparative analysis of various Machine Learning and Deep Learning techniques on chest x-rays based on accuracy, precision, recall, f1 score, and Matthews correlation coefficient. It was observed that improved results were obtained using Deep Learning. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

20.
JOURNAL OF CLINICAL AND DIAGNOSTIC RESEARCH ; 16(7):EC13-EC16, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1969753

ABSTRACT

Introduction: There is inadequate information on infections with the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in children. Their clinical, as well as pathological correlation, is poorly understood. In India, children and adolescents account for 12% of all Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases reported. Children accounted for roughly 11% of those impacted globally last year. However, this year, we are seeing around 20-40% of youngsters in positive instances over the world. Even babies and infants are testing positive for COVID-19, although their illness is under control and seldom becomes fatal. Children aged 5 to 12 years, on the other hand, are at a higher risk. Aim: To study the clinical, pathological and genomic characteristics among children with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 48 paediatric positive patients for SARS-CoV-2 at Government Institute of Medical Sciences, Noida, Uttar Pradesh, and CSIR-Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, New Delhi, India, from 2021 and May 2021. The laboratory testing was done by the real-time Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) method. The patients were classified as mild, moderate, severe, or asymptomatic. Their clinical and pathological findings were recorded in the case sheet. Genomic analyses were done for identifying the genetic variant in the nine selected samples. Data entry and analysis were performed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 26.0. Chi-square test was used for categorical variables and the t-test was used for continuous variables. Results: The study group has median age of 12 years. Male:Female ratio was 2:3. Most children had acquired infection from the community and 30% had the moderate illness and were admitted. Serum Glutamic-Oxalacetic Transaminase (SGOT) and Glutamic-Pyruvic Transaminase (SGPT) were raised in six patients. Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP) was raised in 21 patients and bilirubin was raised in two patients. The average duration of hospitalization was 6 days (range 2-13 days). No mortality among the 48 paediatric patients studied was identified in the hospital. Delta variant (B.1.617.2) was identified in seven patients with D614, P681R, L452R mutations and B.1.617.2 was identified in two patients. Delta variant was present in the paediatric patients but it did not prolong the hospital stay or cause mortality. Conclusion: The findings of the study suggest that children may be a potential source of infection in the SARS CoV2 pandemic while having an asymptomatic to mild illness.

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