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1.
Neurology Perspectives ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1918636

ABSTRACT

Introduction The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has been affecting the world since January 2020. Although its pathogenesis is primarily directed to the respiratory tract, other organs may be affected, including the nervous system. It has also been shown that the social context (confinement, lack of treatment) has affected neurological patients during this period. The aim of the study it was to assess the subjective worsening of neurological/psychiatric diseases in the context of the SARS-Cov-2 pandemic. Methods Three groups of neurological/psychiatric patients were included: Patients who had symptomatic COVID-19 (n = 89), patients who had asymptomatic COVID-19 (n = 40), and a control group (n = 47), consisting of neurological/psychiatric patients without a history of SARS-Cov-2 infection. Results 30.7% of the included individuals considered that their basal pathology had worsened during the study period. This feeling was significantly more frequent (p = 0.01) in patients with symptomatic COVID-19 (39.3%) than in patients of the other 2 groups (21.8%). Worsening was not related to the severity of COVID-19. The neurological conditions that significantly worsened after COVID-19, comparing symptomatic COVID-19 with the other 2 groups, were demyelinating and degenerative diseases. Conclusions These results confirmed the impact of the SARS-Cov-2 pandemic on patients with neurological/psychiatric diseases. Confinement, lack of medical care, and the threat of diagnóstico are surely contributing factors. Although the finding of a higher frequency of worsening in symptomatic COVID-19 patients may be related to greater anxiety/depression in this group of patients, we cannot exclude the role of direct affectation of the nervous system by the virus or damage due to neuroinflammation.

2.
Neurology Perspectives ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1907605

ABSTRACT

Introduction The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has been affecting the world since January 2020. Although its pathogenesis is primarily directed to the respiratory tract, other organs may be affected, including the nervous system. It has also been shown that the social context (confinement, lack of treatment) has affected neurological patients during this period. The aim of the study it was to assess the subjective worsening of neurological/psychiatric diseases in the context of the SARS-Cov-2 pandemic. Methods Three groups of neurological/psychiatric patients were included: Patients who had symptomatic COVID-19 (n = 89), patients who had asymptomatic COVID-19 (n = 40), and a control group (n = 47), consisting of neurological/psychiatric patients without a history of SARS-Cov-2 infection. Results 30.7% of the included individuals considered that their basal pathology had worsened during the study period. This feeling was significantly more frequent (p = 0.01) in patients with symptomatic COVID-19 (39.3%) than in patients of the other 2 groups (21.8%). Worsening was not related to the severity of COVID-19. The neurological conditions that significantly worsened after COVID-19, comparing symptomatic COVID-19 with the other 2 groups, were demyelinating and degenerative diseases. Conclusions These results confirmed the impact of the SARS-Cov-2 pandemic on patients with neurological/psychiatric diseases. Confinement, lack of medical care, and the threat of diagnóstico are surely contributing factors. Although the finding of a higher frequency of worsening in symptomatic COVID-19 patients may be related to greater anxiety/depression in this group of patients, we cannot exclude the role of direct affectation of the nervous system by the virus or damage due to neuroinflammation. Resumen Introducción La pandemia por SARS-CoV-2 afecta al mundo desde enero de 2020. Aunque su patogenia se dirige principalmente a las vías respiratorias, otros órganos pueden verse afectados, incluido el sistema nervioso. También se ha demostrado que el contexto social (confinamiento, falta de tratamiento) ha afectado a los pacientes neurológicos durante este periodo. El objetivo del estudio fue evaluar el empeoramiento subjetivo de enfermedades neurológicas/psiquiátricas en el contexto de la pandemia por SARS-Cov-2. Métodos Se incluyeron tres grupos de pacientes neurológicos/psiquiátricos: pacientes que tenían COVID-19 sintomático (n = 89), pacientes que tenían COVID-19 asintomático (n = 40) y un grupo control (n = 47), formado por pacientes neurológicos/psiquiátricos sin antecedentes de infección por SARS-Cov-2. Resultados El 30,7% de los individuos incluidos consideró que su patología basal había empeorado durante el período de estudio. Este sentimiento fue significativamente más frecuente (p = 0,01) en pacientes con COVID-19 sintomático (39,3%) que en pacientes de los otros 2 grupos (21,8%). El empeoramiento no estuvo relacionado con la gravedad de COVID-19. Las condiciones neurológicas que empeoraron significativamente después de la COVID-19, comparando la COVID-19 sintomática con los otros 2 grupos, fueron las enfermedades desmielinizantes y degenerativas. Conclusiones estos resultados confirmaron el impacto de la pandemia del SARS-Cov-2 en pacientes con enfermedades neurológicas/psiquiátricas. El encierro, la falta de atención médica y la amenaza del diagnóstico son seguramente factores contribuyentes. Aunque el hallazgo de una mayor frecuencia de empeoramiento en pacientes sintomáticos de COVID-19 puede estar relacionado con una mayor ansiedad/depresión en este grupo de pacientes, no podemos excluir el papel de la afectación directa del sistema nervioso por el virus o el daño por neuroinflamación.

3.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(4): e228855, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1801991

ABSTRACT

Importance: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted cancer systems worldwide. Quantifying the changes is critical to informing the delivery of care while the pandemic continues, as well as for system recovery and future pandemic planning. Objective: To quantify change in the delivery of cancer services across the continuum of care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design, Setting, and Participants: This population-based cohort study assessed cancer screening, imaging, diagnostic, treatment, and psychosocial oncological care services delivered in pediatric and adult populations in Ontario, Canada (population 14.7 million), from April 1, 2019, to March 1, 2021. Data were analyzed from May 1 to July 31, 2021. Exposures: COVID-19 pandemic. Main Outcomes and Measures: Cancer service volumes from the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, defined as April 1, 2020, to March 31, 2021, were compared with volumes during a prepandemic period of April 1, 2019, to March 31, 2020. Results: During the first year of the pandemic, there were a total of 4 476 693 cancer care services, compared with 5 644 105 services in the year prior, a difference of 20.7% fewer services of cancer care, representing a potential backlog of 1 167 412 cancer services. While there were less pronounced changes in systemic treatments, emergency and urgent imaging examinations (eg, 1.9% more parenteral systemic treatments) and surgical procedures (eg, 65% more urgent surgical procedures), major reductions were observed for most services beginning in March 2020. Compared with the year prior, during the first pandemic year, cancer screenings were reduced by 42.4% (-1 016 181 screening tests), cancer treatment surgical procedures by 14.1% (-8020 procedures), and radiation treatment visits by 21.0% (-141 629 visits). Biopsies to confirm cancer decreased by up to 41.2% and surgical cancer resections by up to 27.8% during the first pandemic wave. New consultation volumes also decreased, such as for systemic treatment (-8.2%) and radiation treatment (-9.3%). The use of virtual cancer care increased for systemic treatment and radiation treatment and psychosocial oncological care visits, increasing from 0% to 20% of total new or follow-up visits prior to the pandemic up to 78% of total visits in the first pandemic year. Conclusions and Relevance: In this population-based cohort study in Ontario, Canada, large reductions in cancer service volumes were observed. While most services recovered to prepandemic levels at the end of the first pandemic year, a substantial care deficit likely accrued. The anticipated downstream morbidity and mortality associated with this deficit underscore the urgent need to address the backlog and recover cancer care and warrant further study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , Neoplasms , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cohort Studies , Humans , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Ontario/epidemiology , Pandemics
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