Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
Thromb Res ; 218: 171-176, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2004546

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infection with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) results in respiratory syndromes but also in vascular complications such as thromboembolism (TE). In this regard, immunothrombosis, resulting from inflammation in SARS-CoV-2 infected tissues, has been described. Data on TE in COVID-19 are mainly based on clinical observational and/or incomplete autopsy studies. The true burden of TE and the relevance of genetic predisposition, however, have not been resolved. OBJECTIVES: Here, we report on a consecutive cohort of 100 fully autopsied patients deceased by SARS-CoV-2 infections during the first wave of the pandemic (March to April 2020). We investigated the localization of TE, potential clinical risk factors, and the prothrombotic gene mutations, factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A, in postmortem blood or tissue samples. RESULTS: TE was found in 43/100 autopsies. 93 % of TE events were venous occlusions, with 23 patients having pulmonary thromboembolism (PT) with or without lower-extremity deep vein thrombosis. Of these, 70 % showed PT restricted to (sub)segmental arteries, consistent with in situ immunothrombosis. Patients with TE had a significantly higher BMI and died more frequently at an intensive care unit. Hereditary thrombophilia factors were not associated with TE. CONCLUSIONS: Our autopsy results show that a significant proportion of SARS-CoV-2 infected patients suffer from TE, affecting predominantly the venous system. Orthotopic peripheral PT was the most frequent finding. Hereditary thrombophilia appears not to be a determinant for TE in COVID-19. However, obesity and the need for intensive care increase the risk of TE in these patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Embolism , Thromboembolism , Thrombophilia , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Prothrombin/genetics , Pulmonary Embolism/complications , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Thromboembolism/complications , Thrombophilia/complications , Thrombophilia/genetics
2.
J Mol Med (Berl) ; 100(4): 555-568, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653411

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is overwhelming the healthcare systems. Identification of systemic reactions underlying COVID-19 will lead to new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for monitoring and early intervention in this viral infection. We performed targeted metabolomics covering up to 630 metabolites within several key metabolic pathways in plasma samples of 20 hospitalized COVID-19 patients and 37 matched controls. Plasma metabolic signatures specifically differentiated severe COVID-19 from control patients. The identified metabolic signatures indicated distinct alterations in both lipid and amino acid metabolisms in COVID-19 compared to control patient plasma. Systems biology-based analyses identified sphingolipid, tryptophan, tyrosine, glutamine, arginine, and arachidonic acid metabolism as mostly impacted pathways in COVID-19 patients. Notably, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was significantly reduced in COVID-19 patients and GABA plasma levels allowed for stratification of COVID-19 patients with high sensitivity and specificity. The data reveal large metabolic disturbances in COVID-19 patients and suggest use of GABA as potential biomarker and therapeutic target for the infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Biomarkers , Humans , Lipids , Metabolomics , Pandemics , Tryptophan
3.
EBioMedicine ; 67: 103382, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230443

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coagulopathy and inflammation are hallmarks of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and are associated with increased mortality. Clinical and experimental data have revealed a role for neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in COVID-19 disease. The mechanisms that drive thrombo-inflammation in COVID-19 are poorly understood. METHODS: We performed proteomic analysis and immunostaining of postmortem lung tissues from COVID-19 patients and patients with other lung pathologies. We further compared coagulation factor XII (FXII) and DNase activities in plasma samples from COVID-19 patients and healthy control donors and determined NET-induced FXII activation using a chromogenic substrate assay. FINDINGS: FXII expression and activity were increased in the lung parenchyma, within the pulmonary vasculature and in fibrin-rich alveolar spaces of postmortem lung tissues from COVID-19 patients. In agreement with this, plasmaaac acafajföeFXII activation (FXIIa) was increased in samples from COVID-19 patients. Furthermore, FXIIa colocalized with NETs in COVID-19 lung tissue indicating that NETs accumulation leads to FXII contact activation in COVID-19. We further showed that an accumulation of NETs is partially due to impaired NET clearance by extracellular DNases as DNase substitution improved NET dissolution and reduced FXII activation in vitro. INTERPRETATION: Collectively, our study supports that the NET/FXII axis contributes to the pathogenic chain of procoagulant and proinflammatory responses in COVID-19. Targeting both NETs and FXIIa may offer a potential novel therapeutic strategy. FUNDING: This study was supported by the European Union (840189), the Werner Otto Medical Foundation Hamburg (8/95) and the German Research Foundation (FR4239/1-1, A11/SFB877, B08/SFB841 and P06/KFO306).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Factor XII/metabolism , Autopsy , Case-Control Studies , Deoxyribonucleases/blood , Deoxyribonucleases/metabolism , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Neutrophil Activation , Pneumonia , Proteomics
4.
Biomarkers ; 26(5): 417-424, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146879

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: About 20% of ICU patients with COVID-19 require renal replacement therapy (RRT). Mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) might be used for risk assessment. This study investigates MR-proADM for RRT prediction in ICU patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We analysed data of consecutive patients with COVID-19, requiring ICU admission at a university hospital in Germany between March and September 2020. Clinical characteristics, details on AKI, and RRT were assessed. MR-proADM was measured on admission. RESULTS: 64 patients were included (49 (77%) males). Median age was 62.5y (54-73). 47 (73%) patients were ventilated and 50 (78%) needed vasopressors. 25 (39%) patients had severe ARDS, and 10 patients needed veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. 29 (45%) patients required RRT; median time from admission to RRT start was 2 (1-9) days. MR-proADM on admission was higher in the RRT group (2.491 vs. 1.23 nmol/l; p = 0.002) and showed the highest correlation with renalSOFA. ROC curve analysis showed that MR-proADM predicts RRT with an AUC of 0.69 (95% CI: 0.543-0.828; p = 0.019). In multivariable logistic regression MR-proADM was an independent predictor (OR: 3.813, 95% CI 1.110-13.102, p<0.05) for RRT requirement. CONCLUSION: AKI requiring RRT is frequent in ICU patients with COVID-19. MR-proADM on admission was able to predict RRT requirement, which may be of interest for risk stratification and management.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Adrenomedullin/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , Critical Illness/therapy , Protein Precursors/metabolism , Renal Replacement Therapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Aged , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Female , Germany , Hospitals, University , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , ROC Curve , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
5.
J Clin Virol ; 130: 104549, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-650882

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global market for SARS-CoV-2-immunoassays is becoming ever more crowded with antibody-tests of various formats, targets and technologies, careful evaluation is crucial for understanding the implications of individual test results. Here, we evaluate the clinical performance of five automated immunoassays on a set of clinical samples. METHODS: Serum/plasma samples of 75 confirmed COVID-19 patients and 320 pre-pandemic serum samples of healthy blood donors were subjected to two IgG and three total antibody SARS-CoV-2-immunoassays. All test setups were automated workflows. RESULTS: Positivity of assays (onset of symptoms > 10 days) ranged between 68.4 % and 81.6 % (Diasorin 68.4 %, Euroimmun 70.3 %, Siemens 73.7 %, Roche 79.0 % and Wantai 81.6 %). All examined assays demonstrated high specificity of >99 % (Euroimmun, Diasorin: 99.1 %, Wantai: 99.4 %) but only two reached levels above 99.5 % (Roche: 99.7 %, Siemens 100 %). Interestingly, there was no overlap in false positive results between the assays. The strongest correlation of quantitative results was observed between the Diasorin and Euroimmun IgG tests (r2 = 0.76). Overall, we observed no difference in the distribution of test results between female and male patients (p-values: 0.18-0.87). A significant difference between severely versus critically ill patients was demonstrated for the Euroimmun, Diasorin, Wantai and Siemens assays (p-values:0.041). CONCLUSION: All assays showed good clinical performance. Our data confirm that orthogonal test strategies as recommended by the CDC can enhance clinical specificity. However, the suboptimal rates of test positivity found at time of hospitalization in this cohort underline the importance of molecular diagnostics to rule out/confirm active infection with SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Serologic Tests/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Automation, Laboratory , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , False Positive Reactions , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL