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1.
J Res Med Sci ; 26: 82, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472459

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a zoonotic infection, is responsible for COVID-19 pandemic and also is known as a public health concern. However, so far, the origin of the causative virus and its intermediate hosts is yet to be fully determined. SARS-CoV-2 contains nearly 30,000 letters of RNA that allows the virus to infect cells and hijack them to make new viruses. On the other hand, among 14 detected mutations in the SARS-CoV-2 S protein that provide advantages to virus for transmission and evasion form treatment, the D614G mutation (substitution of aspartic acid [D] with glycine [G] in codon 614 was particular which could provide the facilitation of the transmission of the virus and virulence. To date, in contrary to the global effort to come up with various aspects of SARS-CoV-2, there are still great pitfalls in the knowledge of this disease and many angles remain unclear. That's why, the monitoring and periodical investigation of this emerging infection in an epidemiological study seems to be essential. The present study characterizes the current epidemiological status (i.e., possible transmission route, mortality and morbidity risk, emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants, and clinical feature) of the SARS-CoV-2 in the world during these pandemic.

2.
J Neurovirol ; 27(3): 507-509, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1193170

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) represents respiratory symptoms as the most common clinical manifestations. Similar to some other viral infections, it can cause severe neurological damages. Here, we describe a 40-year-old man case who initially was admitted to a major hospital with presenting 7 days with weak flu-like symptoms (cough) and fever then presented neurology signs for 3 days. Physical examination and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed cerebral vasculopathy. Molecular testing was performed on nasopharyngeal swab by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) which was positive for SARS-CoV-2. The patient received supportive cares and was treated with routine antiplatelet therapy. He was improved and discharged 10 days after admission with no symptoms. Our findings report a 40-year-old man with flu-like symptoms that indicate cerebral vasculopathy that was discharged with no symptoms. Therefore, physicians should be monitor patients with worsening or progressive central nervous system results. The pathobiology of this virus is still incompletely known; therefore, extensive studies are needed to reveal the effect of COVID-19 on the nervous system.


Subject(s)
Arteritis/virology , Brain Diseases/virology , COVID-19/complications , Adult , Humans , Iran , Male , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Mol Cell Probes ; 53: 101636, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-621879

ABSTRACT

The recently known coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, has turn into the greatest global health challenge, affecting a large number of societies. The lack of specific treatment and gold-standard diagnostic system has made the situation more complicated. Efforts have led to production of several diagnostic kits that are associated with limitations such as inadequate sensitivity and accuracy. Aptamers as multipotent biological probes could be promising candidates to design sensitive and specific biosensors. Although few studies have introduced specific aptamer types of coronavirus, they may help us select the best approach to obtain specific aptamers for this virus. On the other hand, some of already-introduced aptamers have shown the inhibitory effects on coronavirus that could be applied as therapeutics. The present study has provided a systematic overview on use of aptamer-based biosensors and drugs to diagnose and treat coronavirus.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Aptamers, Nucleotide/therapeutic use , Biosensing Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Aptamers, Nucleotide/metabolism , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy
4.
Complement Ther Clin Pract ; 40: 101214, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-601315

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) as a life-threatening disease is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) that is accounted as global public health concern. Treatment of COVID-19 is primarily supportive and the role of antiviral agents is yet to be established. However, there are no specific anti-COVID-19 drugs and vaccine until now. This review focuses on traditional medicine such as medicinal plant extracts as promising approaches against COVID-19. Chinese, Indian and Iranian traditional medicine, suggests some herbs for prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of the diseases including COVID-19. Although, inhibition of viral replication is considered as general mechanism of herbal extracts, however some studies demonstrated that traditional herbal extracts can interact with key viral proteins which are associated with virus virulence. Chinese, Indian and Iranian traditional medicine, suggests some herbs for prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of the diseases including COVID-19. However the beneficial effects of these traditional medicines and their clinical trials remained to be known. Herein, we reviewed the latest updates on traditional medicines proposed for treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Phytotherapy , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Plants, Medicinal , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , COVID-19 , China , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Humans , India , Iran , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Le infezioni in medicina ; 28(suppl 1):17-Jun, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-599175

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, the emergence of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) infection has been reported unexpectedly in Wuhan, China, with staggering infection speed across China and around the world. To date, seven known strains of HCoVs belonging to four genera (i.e., alpha?, beta?, gamma, and delta-CoV) have been recognized;the latest one has been identified as the SARS-CoV-2. Although the common transmission routes of SARS-CoV-2 is the respiratory tract, it seems that other routes such as the gastrointestinal tract may be effective for the entry of the virus in the body. Although there are no biological markers to predict the susceptibility of humans to COVID-19, several risk factors have been identified to predict the susceptibility of patients to COVID-19. Initial data revealed that males, pregnant women, elderly, and underlying conditions predispose patients to higher morbidity or mortality and also might be at risk for a severe infection of COVID-19. There is a greater need to better understand the mechanisms and risk factors of transmission routes. To date, despite the whole world effort to review various aspects of SARS-CoV-2, including epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment options, there are still gaps in the knowledge of this disease and many issues remain unclear. Therefore, there is an urgent need for update data on SARS-CoV-2. Here, this study provide the current epidemiological status (transmission routes and risk of transmission, possible origins and source, mortality and morbidity risk, and geographical distribution) of the SARS-CoV-2 in the world in 2020.

6.
J Cell Physiol ; 236(1): 49-54, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-599315

ABSTRACT

The emergence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in human populations sparked a global pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). According to preliminary data, about 14% of cases are considered severe and 5% of cases result in critical illness and, reported case fatality rates vary from 1% to more than 7%. However, the symptoms of the disease and the clinical outcome are very different in infected people. In view of these differences, it is clearly apparent that to gain insight into the biology of the SARS-CoV-2, it is important to study not just the infectious particle in itself but also to investigate the virus-host cell interactions that occur during infection. This review seeks to consider the various aspects of genetic factors in determining the susceptibility and host resistance to SARS-CoV-2 throughout the recently published literature.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Communicable Diseases, Emerging , Genome, Viral , Humans
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