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1.
Front Public Health ; 9: 767004, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598043

ABSTRACT

Background: The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound influence on the mental health and well-being of individuals across the globe. Emotional competence, defined as one's ability to recognize, understand, and manage their emotions, has been found linked with mental health problems (e.g., depression and anxiety) in previous studies. However, there is limited knowledge about the direction of the association between these factors among populations exposed to COVID-19. This study examined the possible mediation relationships between depression, anxiety, emotional competence, and COVID-19 exposure among Chinese adolescents. Methods: Responses from 7,958 Chinese adolescents who had previously taken part in a two-wave study before (December 23, 2019-January 13, 2020) and during COVID-19 (June 16, 2020-July 8, 2020) were analyzed (51.67% males, mean age = 11.74, SD = 2.15). Structural equation modeling with three covariates (i.e., age, gender, and ethnicity) was used to test the longitudinal mediation relationships between COVID-19 exposure and depression, anxiety via emotional competence. Results: Results indicated that the prevalence of depression (38.67 to 36.74%) and anxiety (13.02 to 12.77%) decreased from Time 1 to Time 2. The T2 emotional competence significantly mediated the relationship between T2 COVID-19 exposure and T2 anxiety (indirect effect [95% CI] = 0.011 [0.004-0.019], p < 0.05). T2 emotional competence also significantly mediated the relationship between T2 COVID-19 exposure and T2 depression (indirect effect [95% CI] = 0.013 [0.005-0.022], p < 0.05). The results indicated that T2 emotional competence had a significant and negative influence on T2 anxiety (ß = -0.266, SE = 0.005, p < 0.001), and T2 depression (ß = -0.326, SE = 0.029, p < 0.001). Conclusions: This longitudinal research study demonstrated the crucial role of emotional competence in influencing the severity of long-term mental health problems, and suggested that emotional competence interventions can be conducted to improve mental well-being among Chinese adolescents exposed to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Anxiety Disorders , Child , China/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Emotions , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Transl Psychiatry ; 11(1): 460, 2021 09 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397857

ABSTRACT

In network theory depression is conceptualized as a complex network of individual symptoms that influence each other, and central symptoms in the network have the greatest impact on other symptoms. Clinical features of depression are largely determined by sociocultural context. No previous study examined the network structure of depressive symptoms in Hong Kong residents. The aim of this study was to characterize the depressive symptom network structure in a community adult sample in Hong Kong during the COVID-19 pandemic. A total of 11,072 participants were recruited between 24 March and 20 April 2020. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. The network structure of depressive symptoms was characterized, and indices of "strength", "betweenness", and "closeness" were used to identify symptoms central to the network. Network stability was examined using a case-dropping bootstrap procedure. Guilt, Sad Mood, and Energy symptoms had the highest centrality values. In contrast, Concentration, Suicide, and Sleep had lower centrality values. There were no significant differences in network global strength (p = 0.259), distribution of edge weights (p = 0.73) and individual edge weights (all p values > 0.05 after Holm-Bonferroni corrections) between males and females. Guilt, Sad Mood, and Energy symptoms were central in the depressive symptom network. These central symptoms may be targets for focused treatments and future psychological and neurobiological research to gain novel insight into depression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1374, 2021 07 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305560

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Public health measures, such as social isolation, are vital to control the spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), but such measures may increase the risk of depression. Thus, this study examines the influencing and moderating factors of depressive symptoms among individuals subjected to mandatory social isolation. METHODS: An online cross-sectional survey was conducted to collect data from people under mandatory home or centralized social isolation in Shenzhen, China, from February 28 to March 6, 2020. The perceived risk of infection with COVID-19, perceived tone of media coverage, perceived quality of people-oriented public health services, and their depressive symptoms were assessed. Three rounds of stepwise multiple regression were performed to examine the moderating effects after controlling various variables, such as demographics, duration and venue of mandatory social isolation, infection and isolation status of family, time spent on COVID-related news, and online social support. RESULTS: Among the 340 participants, 57.6% were men, the average age was 35.5 years old (SD = 8.37), and 55.6% held a bachelor's degree or above. Individuals subjected to mandatory social isolation generally reported low levels of depressive symptoms. Perceived susceptibility to infection was relatively low, whereas perceived tone of media coverage was mainly positive. In terms of perceived quality of public health services, 12 (3.5%), 103 (30.3%), and 225 (66.2%) participants reported low, medium, and high quality of people-oriented services, respectively. Perceived susceptibility was positively associated with depression, whereas perceived tone of media coverage was negatively associated. The quality of people-centered public health services moderated the association between perceived risk and depressive symptoms and between perceived tone of media coverage and depressive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed the depressive symptoms among individuals subjected to mandatory social isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic and highlighted that frontline public health workers play a critical role in protecting public mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Anxiety , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Health Services , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation
4.
J Health Psychol ; : 13591053211025596, 2021 Jun 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285167

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is associated with Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms (PTSS) and self-reported Posttraumatic Growth (PTG) in the general population. This study used linear regressions for analyses, based on an online survey conducted during the COVID-19 lockdown among 2441 Chinese adults in February 2020. The results showed negative coping and attributing responsibilities to individuals were associated with more PTSS, while both positive and negative coping, as well as attributing responsibilities to individuals were related to more PTG. Moreover, attribution of responsibilities modified the association between coping and PTSS, but not PTG. These findings shed light on mental health interventions in a pandemic context.

5.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 649989, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211874

ABSTRACT

Background: Workplace violence is a major concern for clinicians worldwide. There has been little data on the epidemiology of workplace violence against frontline clinicians during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study examined the pattern of workplace violence and its association with quality of life (QOL) against frontline clinicians during the outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic in China. Methods: A cross-sectional online study was conducted in China between March 15 and March 20, 2020. Frontline clinicians' experience with workplace violence was measured with six standardized questions derived from the Workplace Violence Scale, while anxiety, depressive, and insomnia symptoms, and QOL were measured using the General Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Insomnia Severity Index, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire, respectively. Univariate analyses, multivariable logistic regression analyses, and structural equation modeling (SEM) were conducted. Results: A total of 15,531 clinicians completed the assessment; 2,878 (18.5, 95% CI = 17.92-19.14%) reported workplace violence during the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic (verbal violence: 16.1%; physical violence: 6.9%). According to multivariable models, key correlates of workplace violence were male gender, longer work experience, higher education level, smoking, working in the psychiatry or emergency department, working in tertiary hospitals, being involved in direct care of infected patients, having infected family/ friends/ colleagues, and frequently using social communication programs. Clinicians working in inpatient departments were less likely to report workplace violence compared to those working in outpatient departments. SEM analysis revealed that both violence and emotional disturbances (anxiety, depression, and insomnia) directly affected QOL (standardized direct effect = -0.031, and -0.566, respectively, P < 0.05), while emotional disturbances partly mediated the association between work violence and QOL (standardized indirect effect = -0.184, P < 0.05). Conclusion: Frontline clinicians were vulnerable to workplace violence during the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to the negative impact of workplace violence on quality of care and clinicians' QOL, health authorities and policymakers should take effective measures to reduce workplace violence against clinicians.

6.
Transl Psychiatry ; 11(1): 223, 2021 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1189206

ABSTRACT

Poor psychiatric status and sleep quality were common among frontline healthcare workers (FHWs) during the outbreak of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), but the change in these mental health outcomes overtime remained unknown. This study compared the psychiatric status and sleep quality of FHWs during and after the COVID-19 outbreak in China. FHWs who volunteered to work in Hubei province (the COVID-19 epicenter) were assessed at baseline during the COVID-19 outbreak and re-assessed when they returned to their place of origin (Liaoning province) after the COVID-19 outbreak. Participants' psychiatric status and sleep quality were measured with the Symptom CheckList-90 (SCL-90) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), respectively. A total of 494 FHWs was assessed at baseline and 462 at follow-up assessments. The prevalence of poor psychiatric status was 10.5% at baseline and increased to 14.9% at the follow-up assessment (P = 0.04). The corresponding figures of poor sleep quality at baseline and follow-up assessment were 16.4% and 27.9%, respectively (P < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis found that severe fatigue (p = 0.003, OR = 1.266, 95% CI = 1.081-1.483), poor sleep quality (p < 0.001, OR = 1.283, 95% CI = 1.171-1.405), and history of pre-existing psychiatric disorders (p < 0.001, OR = 5.085, 95% CI = 2.144-12.06) were independently associated with higher odds of poor psychiatric status among the FHWs. Poor psychiatric status and sleep quality were common among FHWs during the COVID-19 outbreak, and the prevalence increased following their volunteer experiences. This suggests a critical need for longer-term psychological support for this subpopulation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Sleep , Adult , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence
7.
PeerJ ; 9: e11154, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1184016

ABSTRACT

Background: Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, all teaching activities in nursing schools were suspended in China, and many nursing students were summoned to work in hospitals to compensate for the shortage of manpower. This study examined the prevalence of fatigue and its association with quality of life (QOL) among nursing students during the post-COVID-19 era in China. Methods: This was a multicenter, cross-sectional study. Nursing students in five Chinese universities were invited to participate. Fatigue, depressive and anxiety symptoms, pain and QOL were measured using standardized instruments. Results: A total of 1,070 nursing students participated. The prevalence of fatigue was 67.3% (95% CI [64.4-70.0]). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that male gender (P = 0.003, OR = 1.73, 95% CI [1.20-2.49]), and being a senior nursing student (second year: OR = 2.20, 95% CI [1.46-3.33], P < 0.001; third year: OR = 3.53, 95% CI [2.31-5.41], P < 0.001; and fourth year OR = 3.59, 95% CI [2.39-5.40], P < 0.001) were significantly associated with more severe fatigue. In addition, moderate economic loss during the COVID-19 pandemic (OR = 1.48, 95% CI [1.08-3.33], P < 0.015; compared to low loss), participants with more severe depressive (OR = 1.48, 95% CI [1.22-1.78], P < 0.001) and anxiety symptoms (OR = 1.12, 95% CI [1.05-1.20], P = 0.001), and more severe pain (OR = 1.67, 95%CI [1.46-1.91], P < 0.001) were significantly associated with reported more severe fatigue. After controlling for covariates, nursing students with fatigue had a lower overall QOL score compared to those without (F (1, 1070) = 31.4, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Fatigue was common among nursing students in the post-COVID-19 era. Considering the negative impact of fatigue on QOL and daily functioning, routine physical and mental health screening should be conducted for nursing students. Effective stress-reduction measures should be enforced to assist this subpopulation to combat fatigue and restore optimal health.

8.
BMJ Open ; 11(3): e048012, 2021 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136083

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic has overwhelmed health systems globally. With the increase of global migration, quantifying the health needs and key correlates of these outcomes is a global health priority. This study assessed migration characteristics, COVID-19 attitudes and the postmigration social environment as key correlates of depression, quality of life and alcohol misuse among international migrants in China. DESIGN: A nationwide cross-sectional online survey was conducted from 17 February and 1 March 2020. SETTING: Links to the online survey were disseminated by migrant-focused community-based organisations through WeChat. PARTICIPANTS: English speaking international migrants who met the inclusion criteria. Inclusion criteria were being born in a country outside of China, aged 18 years or over, cumulatively living in China for 1 month or more and staying in China between December 2019 and February 2020. OUTCOME MEASURES: Depression, quality of life and alcohol misuse. RESULTS: Regression models indicated that planning or considering leaving China due to COVID-19, lacking the confidence to protect themselves and not being confident that the epidemic would end soon was associated with greater depression, lower quality of life and greater levels of alcohol misuse. Worry about contracting COVID-19 and feeling helpless to prevent infection were associated with greater depression and lower quality of life. General perceived social support, and trust in Chinese people, institutions and systems were protective factors for depression and associated with higher reported quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: This study identifies key correlates that, if adequately addressed through public health outreach, may safeguard migrant well-being during a public health emergency. Trust in people and systems within the postmigration environment is an important consideration for future public health planning efforts.


Subject(s)
Alcoholism , COVID-19/psychology , Depression , Quality of Life , Transients and Migrants , Alcoholism/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Int J Biol Sci ; 17(3): 683-688, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1120711

ABSTRACT

This was a national survey that determined the prevalence of depressive symptoms (depression thereafter) and its relationship with quality of life (QOL) in frontline clinicians working in psychiatric hospitals in China during the COVID-19 pandemic. Depression and QOL were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire nine items (PHQ-9) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-brief version (WHOQOL-BREF), respectively. Multivariable logistic regression analyses and analysis of covariance were used. A total of 10,516 frontline clinicians participated in this study, of which, 28.52% (n=2,999) met screening criteria for depression. Compared to those without depression, clinicians with depression had a lower quality of life (F (1, 10515) =2874.66, P<0.001). Higher educational level (OR=1.225, P=0.014), if the number of COVID-19 patients in the hospital catchment area surpassed 500 (OR=1.146, P=0.032), having family/friends/colleagues who were infected (OR=1.695, P<0.001), being a current smoker (OR=1.533, P<0.001), and longer working hours (OR=1.020, P=0.022) were independently associated with higher risk of depression. Living with family members (OR=0.786, P<0.001), and being junior clinicians (OR=0.851, P=0.011) were independently associated with lower odds of depression. The results showed that depression was common in frontline psychiatric clinicians during the COVID-19 pandemic. Timely assessment and effective interventions of depression for frontline clinicians in psychiatric hospitals were warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Pandemics , Psychiatry , Quality of Life , Adult , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Int J Biol Sci ; 16(15): 2895-2905, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-832723

ABSTRACT

Background: There are more than 258 million international migrants worldwide and the majority reside in countries with ongoing novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic outbreaks. International migrants may not receive adequate and timely disease information during epidemics, increasing vulnerability to disease transmission. This is one of very limited studies focusing on international migrants' COVID-19 prevention knowledge and attitudes during the epidemic. Methods: A national cross-sectional online survey was conducted across 100 cities and 26 regions in China from February 17 and March 1, 2020. The sample included 1,426 international migrants representing 77 countries and 6 continents. Knowledge was defined as the number of correct responses to questions about COVID-19. Attitudes included worries, expectations, and general preparedness. Multivariable ordinal logistic regressions evaluated correlates of knowledge and attitudes including information channels and preferences, and trust in Chinese institutions and groups. Results: Just half of the sample, 730/1426 (51.2%) had a good level of knowledge and 656/1426 (46.0%) had a positive attitude towards the COVID-19 epidemic. Knowledge was associated with receiving information through social media (aOR: 2.0, 95%CI: 1.2-3.2), the Internet (aOR: 1.4, 95%CI: 1.2-1.8), the community (aOR: 1.5, 95%CI: 1.2-1.8), and encountering language barriers when receiving medical services (aOR: 0.8, 95%CI: 0.7-1.0). Positive attitude was associated with the level of trust in various Chinese institutions and groups. Conclusions: Roughly half of the sample reported inadequate knowledge and poor attitudes toward prevention and control of COVID-19. Tailored public health campaigns are needed to ensure that international migrants possess adequate knowledge to protect their health during future epidemics and disasters.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Emigrants and Immigrants , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Attitude , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Internationality , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Class , Surveys and Questionnaires , Trust , Young Adult
13.
Psychiatr Q ; 92(2): 683-691, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-743744

ABSTRACT

Patients with severe mental illnesses (SMI) were at high risk of infection during Coronavirus Diseases 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This study examined hospitalized SMI patients' attitude and knowledge towards the COVID-19 infection. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in five psychiatric hospitals located in Gansu province, the most economically underdeveloped area in China. Patients' attitude towards preventive measures and knowledge of COVID-19 were measured by a self-report questionnaire. A total of 925 hospitalized patients with SMI were recruited. Of them, 84.8% (95%CI: 82.4%-87.1%) had positive attitudes towards preventive measures of the COVID-19 outbreak. Being married (OR: 1.55, 95%CI: 1.05-2.30) and a higher educational level (OR: 1.63, 95%CI: 1.12-2.38) were independently associated with positive attitudes towards COVID-19 preventive measures, whereas higher educational level was associated with better knowledge of the COVID-19 outbreak (ß: 0.231, P < 0.001). Patients mainly received COVID-19 relevant knowledge from public media (58.9%), followed by their clinicians (33.2%). Most hospitalized SMI patients in economically underdeveloped areas in China showed positive attitudes towards COVID-19 preventive measures. However, public health education on COVID-19 relevant knowledge by mental health professionals was inadequate to reduce the risk of transmission and infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Inpatients , Mental Disorders/therapy , Poverty Areas , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals, Psychiatric/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged
14.
Global Health ; 16(1): 75, 2020 08 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-721311

ABSTRACT

The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been found in more than 200 countries worldwide since December, 2019. In China, a major reason for the rapid transmission of the COVID-19 in early stage of the outbreak is the huge numbers of passengers boarding their "last train home" to meet family members during the Spring Festival. Most of these travelers were internal migrant workers. In order to reduce the risk of the COVID-19 transmission, public transportation networks were suspended, and many migrant workers who returned to their hometowns needed to be quarantined for 2 weeks, which led to the delay of returning back to cities to work. Many businesses have temporarily closed because of the risk of COVID-19 transmission, leading to unemployment of many workers. Sudden loss of income and further quarantine enforcement in cities can exacerbate existing mental health problems or trigger new mental disorders among affected migrant workers. However, to date no specific guidelines or strategies about mental health services of migrant workers have been released. Health authorities and professionals should pay more attention to this vulnerable group and provide timely mental health service support for those in need.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Emergency Services, Psychiatric , Health Services Needs and Demand , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Transients and Migrants/psychology , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics
15.
Psychol Med ; : 1-12, 2020 Aug 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-713364

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has greatly affected public health and wellbeing. In response to the pandemic threat of the coronavirus epidemic, several countries, including China, adopted lockdown and quarantine policies, which may cause psychological distress. This study aimed to explore the psychological impact of province-wide lockdown and personal quarantine during the COVID-19 outbreak in China as well as the corresponding risk factors and protective factors. METHODS: We examined the immediate (2-week) and delayed (2-month) impact of province-wide lockdown and personal quarantine on psychological distress in a national sample of 1390 Chinese residents. RESULTS: No immediate impact of province-wide lockdown on psychological distress was observed, whereas personal quarantine increased individuals' anxiety, fear, and anger. Despite the lack of initial association, psychological distress increased among those in province-wide lockdown. Self-stigma and personal control both significantly moderated the association between lockdown and psychological distress, but in different directions. Those with higher self-stigma and lower personal control were more impacted by the lockdown. Government support moderated the impact of quarantine on psychological distress, but not that of lockdown. CONCLUSIONS: The delayed effects of lockdown and quarantine on psychological distress were observed, and self-stigma, social support, and perceived control moderate the relationships. This study is the first to demonstrate the psychological costs of province-wide lockdowns on individuals' mental health, providing evidence of the need for mitigation strategies and timely public mental health preparedness in countries with recent outbreaks of COVID-19.

16.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 11(1): 1769379, 2020 Jul 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640022

ABSTRACT

Background: Epidemics are associated with increased burden of psychological distress. However, the role of boredom on mental health during epidemic periods has seldom been explored. Objective: This study attempted to examine the effect of state boredom on psychological outcomes, and the role of media use and meaning in life among the indirectly exposed Chinese adults in the initial phase of the COVID-19 outbreak. Method: An online survey was administered to 917 Chinese adults on 28 January 2020 (1 week after the official declaration of person-to-person transmission of the coronavirus). Self-report questionnaires were used to assess state boredom, anxiety, depression, stress, media use and meaning in life. Moderated mediation analysis was conducted. Results: Our results indicated that the effect of state boredom on anxiety and stress, but not depression, were mediated by media use and that sense of meaning in life modified this association. Meaning in life served as a risk factor, rather than a protective factor for the negative psychological outcomes when people experienced boredom. The association between boredom and media use was significant for high but not low meaning in life individuals. Conclusion: These findings demonstrated that boredom and media use were associated with an increased burden or psychological distress in the sample. It is important to pay attention to the possible negative impact of boredom and media use during COVID-19, and find more ways to cope with boredom, especially those with high presence of meaning in life.


Antecedentes: Las epidemias están asociadas con aumento de la carga de malestar psicológico. Sin embargo, el papel del aburrimiento en la salud mental durante periodos de epidemia ha sido rara vez explorado.Objetivo: Este estudio intentó examinar el efecto del estado de aburrimiento en las consecuencias psicológicas y el papel del uso de los medios y significado en la vida entre los adultos chinos indirectamente expuestos en la fase inicial del brote de COVID-19.Método: Se administró una encuesta online a 917 adultos chinos el 28 de Enero del 2020 (una semana después de la declaración oficial de la transmisión del coronavirus persona a persona). Se usaron cuestionarios de auto-reporte para evaluar el estado de aburrimiento, ansiedad, depresión, estrés, uso de medios y significado en la vida. Se realizó un análisis de mediación moderado.Resultados: Nuestros resultados indicaron que el efecto del estado de aburrimiento sobre la ansiedad y el estrés, pero no depresión, estuvieron mediados por el uso de los medios y que el sentido de significado en la vida modificó esta asociación. El significado en la vida sirvió como factor de riesgo, más que como un factor protector para las consecuencias psicológicas negativas cuando la gente experimentó aburrimiento. La asociación entre aburrimiento y uso de los medios fue significativa para el significado alto pero no bajo en la vida en los individuos.Conclusiones: Estos hallazgos demostraron que, en la muestra, el aburrimiento y el uso de los medios estuvieron asociados con un aumento de la carga o malestar psicológico. Es importante poner atención acerca del posible impacto negativo del aburrimiento y el uso de los medios durante el COVID-19, y encontrar más formas de lidiar con el aburrimiento, especialmente aquellos con presencia alta de significado en la vida.背景: 流行病与增加的心理负担有关。但是, 少有研究探讨无聊在流行病爆发期间对心理健康的作用。目的: 本研究试图探讨在COVID-19爆发初期, 非直接暴露于疾病的中国成年人的状态无聊对心理结果的影响, 以及媒体使用和生命意义感在其中的作用。方法: 本研究于2020å¹´1月28日 (即官方宣布冠状病毒人传人之后一周) 对917名中国成年人进行了在线调查。使用自我报告量表评估状态无聊, 焦虑, 抑郁, 压力, 媒体使用和生命意义感。进行了中介调节分析。结果: 状态无聊对焦虑和压力的影响 (而非抑郁) 是由媒体使用中介的, 并且生命意义感起了调节作用。当人们感到无聊时, 生命意义感是产生负面心理结果的危险因素, 而不是保护因素。无聊与媒体使用的显著关联仅体现在生命意义感高的个体中。结论: 在当前样本中, 无聊和媒体使用与增加的心理负担有关。需要关注在COVID-19疫情期间无聊和媒体使用可能带来的负面影响, 并找到更多应对无聊的方法, 尤其是那些具有高生命意义感的个体。.

19.
J Anxiety Disord ; 74: 102248, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-401637

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak in China led to an extraordinary threat to public health and wellbeing. This study examined the psychological impact of media use among people indirectly exposed to the disease during the initial phase of the outbreak. We conducted an internet-based survey on January 28, 2020 (one week after the official declaration of person-to-person transmission of the coronavirus). Media use (media forms, content of media exposure, and media engagement) related to the outbreak and psychological outcomes (positive and negative affect, anxiety, depression, and stress) of 917 Chinese adults was assessed. A series of multivariable regressions were conducted. The results showed that use of new media, rather than traditional media, was significantly associated with more negative affect, depression, anxiety, and stress. Viewing stressful content (i.e., severity of the outbreak, reports from hospital) was associated with more negative affect and depression. Media engagement was also associated with more negative affect, anxiety, and stress. However, viewing heroic acts, speeches from experts, and knowledge of the disease and prevention were associated with more positive affect and less depression. The study suggested new media use and more media engagement was associated with negative psychological outcomes, while certain media content was associated with positive psychological impact. The present study highlights the need for timely public health communication from official sources and suggests that reduced exposure to new media may be beneficial.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Education , Internet/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
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