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4.
Front Public Health ; 9: 707358, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515549

ABSTRACT

Nurses caring for patients who contract coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have experienced significant traumas in the form of increased workloads, negative patient outcomes, and less social support system access. Nurses should be provided with information regarding early detection, coping skills and treatment for anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSS)/post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and other mental health disorders. Early intervention is important as mental health disorders can cause dysfunction, internal suffering, and in the most extreme situations, lead to death if not properly cared for. Healthcare corporations should consider providing coverage for mental health treatment for employees who experience COVID-19 traumas. With the implementation of healthy coping skills and therapeutic intervention, nurses will be able to let go of the negative impacts that the COVID-19 pandemic has caused and reintegrate into their roles as caring and entrusted health care providers. The current paper evaluates the mental health disorders encountered by nurses in the COVID-19 era based on the current medical literature and aims to provide practical coping strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Adaptation, Psychological , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open ; 9(7): e3717, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328944

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic limited the ability of medical students to participate in plastic surgery sub-internships and to attend residency interviews in person during the 2020-2021 match cycle. A podcast and accompanying online directory were created to introduce integrated plastic surgery residency programs to medical students from the perspective of current residents. Since July 2020, a total of 49 plastic surgery residents representing 42 programs have participated in the podcast. Topics of discussion included program logistics, faculty leadership, and aspects of resident lifestyle of interest to medical students and future residency candidates. The podcast has had a total of 5072 downloads (mean 121 downloads per episode). The majority of listeners (90%) were in the United States. Twenty-five plastic surgery applicants who participated in the 2020-2021 National Resident Matching Program match cycle responded to a feedback survey. Listeners reported that the podcast was useful for preparing for interviews, making rank lists, and learning about programs that they otherwise would not have considered. Most listeners (90%) ranked the podcast as one of their top three resources for learning about plastic surgery programs during the application and interview process. Future directions include completion of episodes for all integrated plastic surgery programs and expansion to other surgical subspecialties and plastic surgery fellowships.

7.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(2): 326e-327e, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1297446
10.
Surgery ; 170(5): 1405-1410, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270633

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has disrupted the delivery of safe surgical care worldwide. One specific aspect of global surgical care that has been severely limited is the ability for physicians and trainees to participate in global surgical outreach programs in low- and middle-income countries. METHODS: A narrative review of the literature regarding global surgical outreach programs during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic was performed. Factors that must be considered in the reinstatement of global surgical outreach programs were identified, and suggestions to address them were provided based on the available literature and the experiences of the senior authors. RESULTS: As global surgical outreach programs were canceled at the start of the pandemic, many academic surgeons turned to digital solutions to continue to engage with low- and middle-income country partners. With the advent of coronavirus disease 2019 vaccines and improved access to testing and treatment worldwide, the recommencement of global surgical outreach programs may begin to be considered. Important considerations before initiation include vaccine and testing availability for visiting providers, local staff, and patients, local hospital capacity, staff and equipment shortages, and the characteristics of the patient population and visiting providers. Region- and country-specific factors, including local infection rates and concomitant health crises, must also be taken into account. Expansion of digital collaborative efforts may further deepen international connections and promote sustainable models of care. CONCLUSION: With careful consideration, global surgical outreach programs may begin to be safely restarted in the near future. The current article evaluates individual factors that must be considered to safely restart global surgical outreach programs as the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic is better controlled.


Subject(s)
General Surgery , Global Health , Medical Missions , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics
14.
Front Sports Act Living ; 3: 663918, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156168
16.
JMIR Med Educ ; 6(2): e22045, 2020 Nov 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895251

ABSTRACT

The current COVID-19 pandemic has vastly impacted the health care system in the United States, and it is continuing to dictate its unprecedented influence on the education systems, especially the residency and fellowship training programs. The impact of COVID-19 on these training programs has not been uniform across the board, with plastic surgery residency and fellowship programs among the hardest hit specialties. Implementation of social distancing regulations has affected departmental educational activities, including preoperative, morbidity and mortality conferences and journal clubs; operating room educational activities; as well as the overall education of plastic surgery trainees in the United States. Almost all elective and semielective surgeries across the United States were suspended for a few months during the COVID-19 pandemic; this constitutes a significant portion of plastic surgery cases. Considering the current staged reopening policies, it may be a long time, if ever, before restrictions are completely lifted. In this paper, we review the multidimensional impact of the current COVID-19 pandemic on the training programs of plastic surgery residents and fellows in the United States and worldwide, along with some potential solutions on how to address existing challenges.

17.
Aesthetic Plast Surg ; 44(6): 2330-2334, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-754632

ABSTRACT

The global pandemic of coronavirus 2019, or COVID-19, has undeniably impacted all facets of healthcare, affecting both its function and provision. Due to the cessation of all non-emergent surgical cases in the USA and worldwide, the professional lives and practices of many physicians have been negatively affected. However, among different physicians and specifically plastic surgeons, cosmetic/aesthetic plastic surgeons have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic as the majority of their cases are semi-elective and elective. The ability to perform semi-elective and elective cases is dependent on state and local authorities' regulations, and it is currently uncertain when the ban, if ever, will be completely lifted. Financial constraints on patients and their future inability to pay for these procedures due to the COVID-19-related economic recession are things to consider. Overall, the goal of this unprecedented time for cosmetic/aesthetic plastic surgeons is for their medical practices to survive, to conserve cash flow although income is low to none, and to maintain their personal finances. In this paper, the authors review the financial impacts of the current COVID-19 pandemic on the practices of cosmetic plastic surgeons in the USA and worldwide, along with some potential approaches to maintain their practices and financial livelihoods. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE V: This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cosmetic Techniques/economics , Infection Control/economics , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/economics , Safety Management/organization & administration , Elective Surgical Procedures/economics , Esthetics , Female , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Male , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/methods
18.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(6): e19934, 2020 06 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-742630

ABSTRACT

Since the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak a pandemic, significant changes have occurred in the United States as the infection spread reached and passed its exponential phase. A stringent analysis of COVID-19 epidemiologic data requires time and would generally be expected to happen with significant delay after the exponential phase of the disease is over and when the focus of the health care system is diverted away from crisis management. Although much has been said about high-risk groups and the vulnerability of the elderly and patients with underlying comorbidities, the impact of race on the susceptibility of ethnic minorities living in indigent communities has not been discussed in detail worldwide and specifically in the United States. There are currently some data on disparities between African American and Caucasian populations for COVID-19 infection and mortality. While health care authorities are reorganizing resources and infrastructure to provide care for symptomatic COVID-19 patients, they should not shy away from protecting the general public as a whole and specifically the most vulnerable members of society, such as the elderly, ethnic minorities, and people with underlying comorbidities.


Subject(s)
African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aged , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , /statistics & numerical data
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