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1.
Cancer Research Conference: American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting, ACCR ; 83(7 Supplement), 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20238091

ABSTRACT

Introduction Patients with hematological malignancies, including multiple myeloma (MM), experience suboptimal responses to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS) and Smoldering Multiple Myeloma (SMM) are precursors to MM and exhibit altered immune cell composition and function. The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and the subsequent population-wide vaccination represent an opportunity to study the real-life immune response to a common antigen. Here, we present updated results from the IMPACT study, a study we launched in November 2020 to characterize the effect of plasma cell premalignancy on response to SARS-CoV2 vaccination (vx). Methods We performed: (i) ELISA for SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies on 1,887 peripheral blood (PB) samples (237 healthy donors (HD), and 550 MGUS, 947 SMM, and 153 MM patients) drawn preand post-vx;(ii) single-cell RNA, T cell receptor (TCR), and B cell receptor (BCR) sequencing (10x Genomics) on 224 PB samples (26 HD, and 20 MGUS, 48 SMM, and 24 MM patients) drawn preand post-vx;(iii) plasma cytokine profiling (Olink) on 106 PB samples (32 HD, and 38 MGUS and 36 SMM patients) drawn pre- and post-vx;and (iv) bulk TCR sequencing (Adaptive Biotechnologies) on 8 PB samples from 4 patients (2 MGUS, 2 SMM) drawn pre- and post-vx. Results Patients with MGUS and SMM achieved comparable antibody titers to HD two months post-vx. However, patient titers waned significantly faster, and 4 months post-vx we observed significantly lower titers in both MGUS (Wilcoxon rank-sum, p=0.030) and SMM (p=0.010). These results indicate impaired humoral immune response in patients with MGUS and SMM.At baseline, the TCR repertoire was significantly less diverse in patients with SMM compared to HD (Wilcoxon rank-sum, p=0.039), while no significant difference was observed in the BCR repertoire (p=0.095). Interestingly, a significant increase in TCR repertoire diversity was observed post-vx in patients with SMM (paired t-test, p=0.014), indicating rare T cell clone recruitment in response to vaccination. In both HD and patients, recruited clones showed upregulation of genes associated with CD4+ naive and memory T cells, suggesting preservation of the T cell response in SMM, which was confirmed by bulk TCR-sequencing in 4 patients.Lastly, by cytokine profiling, we observed a defect in IL-1beta and IL-18 induction post-vx in patients with SMM compared to HD (Wilcoxon rank-sum, p=0.047 and p=0.015, respectively), two key monocyte-derived mediators of acute inflammation, suggesting an altered innate immune response as well. Conclusion Taken together, our findings highlight that despite the absence of clinical manifestations, plasma cell premalignancy is associated with defects in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Therefore, patients with plasma cell premalignancy may require adjusted vaccination strategies for optimal immunization.

2.
Benchmarking Library, Information and Education Services: New Strategic Choices in Challenging Times ; : 201-215, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2296104

ABSTRACT

Technology in education (edtech) has often been viewed as something of a Cinderella subject—"one day you shall go to the ball, but that day never seems to come.” This chapter explores the promise and vision of edtech espoused by its most ardent enthusiasts, and how this has collided with the realities of overhyped and underbaked technologies and conservative education systems. It goes on to consider the system shock created by the COVID-19 pandemic and how those education systems and the people involved in them ultimately responded to what was for many the most profound and far-reaching crisis they had ever experienced. The chapter includes case studies of two of these system-level responses that the author has been personally involved with, and it concludes with a discussion comparing and contrasting these system-level responses with the visions of the edtech mavens. © 2023 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

3.
Kinesiology Review ; 11(4):285-296, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2193361

ABSTRACT

Peer mentoring is a learning process wherein a more experienced student provides advice and support to a less experienced student during their academic career. At the graduate level, peer mentoring has been shown to increase social support, career readiness, retention, and graduation rates among first-year students. In spring 2021, the Exercise Science graduate program at Texas State University initiated a peer mentoring program. The participants reported that they felt more integrated in the graduate program.Meeting and socializing with mentor/mentee have enhanced their sense of belonging and relatedness, especially during COVID, when students felt more isolated. The professional relationship made them more prone to return and strive for academic success. This article describes a peer mentoring program that has been successfully implemented in a kinesiology graduate program and makes recommendations for universities to study the impact of peer mentoring on marginalized student well-being, retention, career readiness, and academic success in future research. © 2022 American Kinesiology Association.

4.
Journal of Neuromuscular Diseases ; 9:S213-S214, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2043404

ABSTRACT

The UK Myotonic Dystrophy Patient Registry is a patient self-enrolling online database collecting clinical and genetic information about myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2). The registry was established in May 2012 with support from Muscular Dystrophy UK and the Myotonic Dystrophy Support Group and is coordinated Newcastle University. The registry aims to facilitate academic and clinical research, better characterise and understand DM, and disseminate information relating to upcoming studies and research advancements. The registry is used to capture longitudinal, selfreported data through an online portal available to patients and clinicians. Where specialised clinical or genetic information is required, the neuromuscular specialist involved in the patient's care can be invited to provide some additional information and the patient can select them from a pre-populated list at the registration stage. The registry is a Core Member of the TREAT-NMD Global Registries Network for DM1. Between May 2012 and January 2022, there were 834 patient registrations. On average there are 5 new registrations per month. For those reporting a clinical diagnosis, 96% have DM1 (of which 14% have a diagnosis of congenital DM) and 4% have DM2. Overall, 40% of patients have had genetic confirmation of their condition provided. The registry has previously supported almost 30 research enquiries to date. Since 2020, the registry has facilitated 11 enquiries including an industry enquiry, three COVID-19 surveys, and various surveys capturing information on dysphagia, pregnancy, patient preferences for future treatments and the patient/ caregiver experience. The registry continues to be a versatile, cost-effective research tool, helping facilitate and advance a range of DM research. Additional work continues to be done to improve reporting of genetic information on the registry and there are future data linkage plans between the registry and the Newcastle Research Biobank for Rare and Neuromuscular Diseases.

5.
IISE Annual Conference and Expo 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2011511

ABSTRACT

This research aims to quantify racial disparities associated with COVID-19 cases and deaths in Georgia and Mississippi. It investigates ethnic disparities at the county level, based on socioeconomic factors. The factors used include the county population, median income, percentage of the county population per ethnic group, and county presidential election party major. In addition, COVID-19 cases and death rates by ethnicity were provided. The combined data was used for K-means clustering analysis and Analysis of Variances, to investigate the differences due to ethnicity per county and the differences due to aggregated cases and death rates per county. The results showed a significant difference in the ethnic group's COVID-19 cases and deaths as well as the socioeconomic factors that might have affected these rates. Specifically, counties with the Republican party as the presidential political party majority had significantly more cases and deaths for American Indian and Alaskan Native (AIAN), Black, and White ethnic groups in Mississippi and Georgia. There was no significant statistical difference between the Asian and Latinx groups. This research concluded that there is a significant difference in the COVID-19 deaths and cases based on the ethnic groups due to socioeconomic factors and the political party majority of the counties. In addition, counties with significant cases and death rates consist of large proportions of people of color than their population representation percentage based on the 2020 Census. © 2022 IISE Annual Conference and Expo 2022. All rights reserved.

6.
Cancer Research ; 82(12), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1986498

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Patients with hematologic malignancies, including multiple myeloma (MM), experience worse SARS-CoV-2 infection outcomes and sub-optimal vaccine responses. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) precede MM and affect ∼5% of individuals age >=50. We previously showed that individuals with MGUS and SMM exhibit immune dysregulation. Here, we investigate the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in these asymptomatic but potentially immunocompromised individuals. Methods: The IMPACT study (IRB #20-332) is a prospective study at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in collaboration with MMRF, which enrolled individuals nationwide with a diagnosed plasma cell dyscrasia and healthy individuals. As of October 2021, 3,005 individuals completed a questionnaire regarding prior infection or vaccination. We obtained 1,350 blood samples from 628 participants and analyzed anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody titer by ELISA. Results: 2,771 (92%) participants were fully vaccinated (2 doses BNT162b2 or mRNA-1273;1 dose Ad26.COV2.s), 269 (9%) had received a 3rd mRNA vaccine dose, and 234 (8%) were unvaccinated. 1,387 (46%) and 1,093 (36%) participants received mRNA vaccines (BNT162b2 and mRNA-1273), and 139 (5%) participants received an adenovirus vector vaccine (Ad26.COV2.S). 34 (1%) individuals reported SARS-CoV-2 infection after full vaccination. We measured antibody titers in 201 MGUS, 223 SMM, 40 smoldering Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (SWM), 64 MM, and 100 healthy controls. Multiple linear regression model estimated the association between various clinical variables and post-vaccination antibody titers. As previously reported, having MM was associated with low antibody titer (p < 0.001). Of note, having SMM, regardless of risk stratification by 2/20/20 criteria, was also associated with low antibody titers, indicating that even low-risk SMM patients have a poor response to vaccination. MGUS and SWM diagnoses were not significantly associated with antibody titers. Additionally, male sex (p < 0.010), elapsed time after vaccination (p < 0.001), and BNT162b2 vaccine (p < 0.001) were associated with low antibody titers. SARS-CoV-2 infection prior to vaccination was associated with high antibody titers. We identified 25 patients (6 MGUS, 10 SMM, 2 SWM, 7 MM) who submitted blood samples after both the 2nd and 3rd dose. In these patients we observed a significant increase in antibody titer after a 3rd dose (p = 0.002). We also observed that antibody titers of patients after a 3rd dose (13 MGUS, 12 SMM, 2 SWM, 31 MM) were comparable to that of healthy individuals after a 2nd dose (p = 0.833). Conclusion: Our data indicates that suboptimal response to SARS-CoV-2 does not only occur with MM and cancer patients receiving therapy but also in precursor asymptomatic patients including low-risk SMM.

7.
Libraries, Digital Information, and COVID: Practical Applications and Approaches to Challenge and Change ; : 281-289, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1787962

ABSTRACT

There was a time when libraries were at the global digital forefront, with initiatives like the United Kingdom’s Electronic Libraries Programme (eLib-Rusbridge, 1995) and the joint Digital Libraries Initiative (Griffin, 1998) in America. However, as the Internet and digital technologies have become more and more embedded in our daily lives it has sometimes felt as though libraries and perhaps even librarians may be an endangered species-Blockbuster in a Netflix age. The COVID-19 era has accelerated and enforced that digital shift which was taking place already, forcing many libraries to move to new operating models-from pure digital to “click and collect” with many other permutations in between. In this chapter I will look at how libraries can play a catalytic role in helping us to bounce back from the pandemic, and how the very nature of what we think of as a library is changing-perhaps for good. © 2021 David Baker and Lucy Ellis Published by Elsevier Ltd.

8.
Journal of Investigative Medicine ; 70(1):152-152, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1613044
9.
Journal of Investigative Medicine ; 70(1):117-117, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1613035
10.
Journal of Investigative Medicine ; 70(1):116-117, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1613034
11.
Journal of Pediatric Intensive Care ; : 5, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1434194

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has pushed medical educators and learners to adapt to virtual learning (VL) in an expedited manner. The effect of VL for critical care education has not yet been evaluated. In a quantitative analysis of survey data and attendance records, we sought to determine the association of VL with conference attendance and work-life balance. Attending physicians, fellows, and advanced practice providers (APP) at a pediatric critical care department at a quaternary children's hospital participated in the study. Attendance records were obtained before and after the adaption of a VL platform. In addition, an electronic, anonymous survey to evaluate current satisfaction and the strengths and weaknesses of VL as well as its impact on work-life balance was administered. In total, 31 learners (17 attending physicians, 13 fellows, and 1 APP) completed the survey. A total of 83.9% (26/31) of participants were satisfied, and 77.4% (24/31) found VL to be similar or more engaging than non-VL. However, 6.5% (2/31) of learners reported difficulty in using the new platform, 87% (27/31) of participants supported VL as an effective learning tool, and 83.3% (25/30) reported a positive impact on work-life balance. Additionally, median monthly conference attendance increased significantly from 85 to 114 attendees per month (p<0.05). Our results suggest that a virtual model has advantages for overall attendance and work-life balance. We anticipate VL will continue to be an integral part of medical education. Future work evaluating the impact of VL on interdepartmental and interinstitutional collaborations is needed.

12.
Australian & New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology ; 61:63-63, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1250245
13.
Clin Radiol ; 75(11): 872-873, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-731746
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