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1.
Am J Health Behav ; 47(2): 228-236, 2023 04 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238480

ABSTRACT

Objective: Three types of leisure activities such as sedentary, social, and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) have been identified as essential factors that influence mental health outcomes among older adults with diabetes. In this study, we aimed to investigate what types of leisure activities are associated with mental health outcomes among older adults with diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: We used 2020 Health and Retirement Study (HRS) data. We extracted 310 records from 3266 individuals diagnosed with diabetes and conducted a hierarchical regression analysis to investigate the research question. Results: LTPA was the strongest predictor of reduced loneliness and stress and increased happiness and life satisfaction among older adults with diabetes. Discussion: Our findings highlight the relationship between different types of leisure activities and mental health for older adults with diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data suggest that LTPA, social leisure, and sedentary leisure reduce loneliness and stress and improve happiness and life satisfaction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Humans , Aged , Mental Health , Pandemics , Leisure Activities
2.
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved ; 34(1):21-34, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2315281

ABSTRACT

Certain populations have been excluded from the benefits of telehealth and the recent advances and widespread use of technology in health promotion due to limited technology access. Although research has identified these specific groups, none has explored these issues using the social determinants of health (SDH) framework. This exploratory study aimed 1) to investigate technology access and 2) to identify associated SDHs. A cross-sectional research design was implemented, and participants were recruited from rural Alabama (N=185). Binary logistic regressions were conducted. Only 60% of participants had technology access. People with food insecurity and health illiteracy were less likely to have internet and PC/tablet access. In addition, older age was associated with a lower likelihood of access to a smartphone. This study provided insights into SDH correlates of the digital divide, particularly among rural African Americans, and indicated that addressing affordability could be a partial solution.

3.
Front Psychol ; 13: 939190, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1928447

ABSTRACT

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2022.881539.].

4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(12)2022 06 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1896851

ABSTRACT

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, many online programs for social meetings, education, leisure, and physical activities have been developed and provided; however, children with cerebral palsy (CP) cannot enjoy online programs in the same way that those without disabilities can. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in reintegration to normal living (RNL), social interaction, and quality of life among school-age children with CP after participation in a game-based online-offline hybrid group exercise program. The current study was conducted on 26 children with CP who participated in a hybrid exercise program. The RNL, social interaction, and quality of life were measured before and after the six-week program. The scores of RNL and quality of life were improved (p < 0.05) after program participation. Online or hybrid exercise programs incorporating interactive methods (i.e., competition and cooperating) could enhance RNL and quality of life of children with CP. Thus, well-designed online or hybrid exercise programs should be developed and provided for children with CP to enhance overall quality of life during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cerebral Palsy , Wheelchairs , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cerebral Palsy/epidemiology , Cerebral Palsy/therapy , Child , Exercise , Exercise Therapy/methods , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Republic of Korea/epidemiology
5.
Front Psychol ; 13: 881539, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1855431

ABSTRACT

Open access to information is now a universal phenomenon thanks to rapid technological developments across the globe. This open and universal access to information is a key value of democratic societies because, in principle, it supports well-informed decision-making on individual, local, and global matters. In practice, however, without appropriate readiness for navigation in a dynamic information landscape, such access to information can become a threat to public health, safety, and economy, as the COVID-19 pandemic has shown. In the past, this readiness was often conceptualized in terms of adequate literacy levels, but the contemporarily observed highest-ever literacy levels have not immunized our societies against the risks of misinformation. Therefore, in this Perspective, we argue that democratization of access to information endows citizens with new responsibilities, and second, these responsibilities demand readiness that cannot be reduced to mere literacy levels. In fact, this readiness builds on individual adequate literacy skills, but also requires rational thinking and awareness of own information processing. We gather evidence from developmental, educational, and cognitive psychology to show how these aspects of readiness could be improved through education interventions, and how they may be related to healthy work-home balance and self-efficacy. All these components of education are critical to responsible global citizenship and will determine the future direction of our societies.

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