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1.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 766127, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528867

ABSTRACT

Background: By investigating the incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among residents during a period of low transmission, this study reflects the long-term impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and identify which categories of residents are more likely to develop PTSD due to an acute infectious disease crisis, facilitating the development of targeted strategies to protect mental health after outbreaks of similar acute infectious diseases in the future. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in China from 4 to 26 February 2021. A convenience sampling strategy was adopted to recruit participants. Participants were asked to complete the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). A multivariable linear stepwise regression analysis model was used to identify which factors were associated with PTSD in residents of China. Results: A total of 2,361 Chinese residents completed the questionnaire. The mean PCL-5 score for the respondents was 13.65 (SD = 8.66), with 219 (9.28%) patients having probable PTSD symptoms. Respondents who were female (ß = 0.038), had a relative or friend who had contracted COVID-19 (ß = 0.041), and had poor health (ß = 0.184) had higher PCL-5 scores, while the population aged over 60 years (ß = -0.063), who agreed that COVID-19 information was released in a timely manner (ß = -0.347), who had experienced a relatively limited impact of COVID-19 on their life (ß = -0.069), and who agreed that the local prevention initiatives were sophisticated (ß = -0.165) had lower PTSD scores. Conclusions: Outbreaks of acute infectious diseases can have long-term psychological health effects in the general population. In addition, health policy makers need to be concerned about and implement measures to support the mental health of vulnerable groups.

3.
Front Public Health ; 9: 702146, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376722

ABSTRACT

Background: Policymakers must promote the development of public health education and human resources. As a feature of the political environment, public opinion is essential for policy-making, but virtually the attitudes of Chinese citizens toward human resources development in public health is unknown. Methods: This study conducted a crosssectional survey from February 4, 2021 to February 26, 2021 in China. We adopted a convenient sampling strategy to recruit participators. Participants filled out the questions, which assess the attitudes of the expanding public health professionals. A logistic regression analysis was given to identify the predictors associated with the attitudes of the subjects. Results: There were 2,361 residents who have finished our questionnaire. Chinese residents who lived in urban (OR = 1.293, 95% CI = 1.051-1.591), "themselves or relatives and friends have participated in relevant epidemic prevention work" (OR = 1.553, 95% CI = 1.160-2.079), "themselves or family members engaged in medical-related work" (OR = 1.468, 95% CI = 1.048-2.056), and those who "were aware of public health before the outbreak of COVID-19" (OR = 1.428, 95% CI = 1.125-1.812) were more likely to support the promotion of public health education and training. Conclusions: The present study found that 74.50% of Chinese citizens supported the promotion of public health education and training in China, in which economic status, personal perception, and comprehension are the crucial factors that influence public opinion. COVID-19 has aroused the attention of Chinese residents to public health education, with only 22.11% of residents being aware of public health before the outbreak of COVID-19. The COVID-19 pandemic has profound implications for human society. Literally, this impact will feed back into future public health policies based on public opinion. This innovative perspective will also help us better understand the potential social impact of COVID-19 on human resources and development for health in the modern world.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , China/epidemiology , Health Education , Humans , Motivation , Public Opinion , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine ; 14(6):241-253, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1310155

ABSTRACT

Background: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) strategies in COVID-19 patients differ from those in patients suffering from cardiogenic cardiac arrest. During CPR, both healthcare and non-healthcare workers who provide resuscitation are at risk of infection. The Working Group for Expert Consensus on Prevention and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for Cardiac Arrest in COVID-19 has developed this Chinese Expert Consensus to guide clinical practice of CPR in COVID-19 patients. Main recommendations: (1) A medical team should be assigned to evaluate severe and critical COVID-19 for early monitoring of cardiac-arrest warning signs. (2) Psychological counseling and treatment are highly recommended, since sympathetic and vagal abnormalities induced by psychological stress from the COVID-19 pandemic can induce cardiac arrest. (3) Healthcare workers should wear personal protective equipment (PPE). (4) Mouth-to-mouth ventilation should be avoided on patients suspected of having or diagnosed with COVID-19. (5) Hands-only chest compression and mechanical chest compression are recommended. (6) Tracheal-intubation procedures should be optimized and tracheal-intubation strategies should be implemented early. (7) CPR should be provided for 20-30 min. (8) Various factors should be taken into consideration such as the interests of patients and family members, ethics, transmission risks, and laws and regulations governing infectious disease control. Changes in management: The following changes or modifications to CPR strategy in COVID-19 patients are proposed: (1) Healthcare workers should wear PPE. (2) Hands-only chest compression and mechanical chest compression can be implemented to reduce or avoid the spread of viruses by aerosols. (3) Both the benefits to patients and the risk of infection should be considered. (4) Hhealthcare workers should be fully aware of and trained in CPR strategies and procedures specifically for patients with COVID-19.

6.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-761

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an emerging infectious disease that first manifested in Wuhan, China in December 2019 and which has subseque

7.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 7: 485, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-732887

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an emerging infectious disease that has spread worldwide. Methods: This was a retrospective case series involving 218 patients admitted to three tertiary hospitals in the Loudi, Shaoyang, and Xiangtan areas of China from January 21 to June 27, 2020, who were confirmed by RT-PCR to have SARS-CoV-2. The patients' clinical characteristics, laboratory results, treatments, and prognoses based on clinical classification were recorded. Poor outcome was defined as admission to an ICU, the use of mechanical ventilation, or death. Results: The patients were classified into four clinical groups based on disease severity, namely mild (10/218, 5%), moderate (146/218, 67%), severe (24/218, 11%), or critical (14/218, 6%); 24 (11%) asymptomatic cases were also included in the study. The most common symptoms were self-reported cough (162/218, 74%), fever (145/218, 67%), sputum production (99/218, 45%), and fatigue (77/218, 35%). Among the 218 patients, 192 (88%) received lopinavir/ritonavir and interferon-alpha inhalation, and 196 (90%) patients received traditional Chinese medicine. Among the severe and critical patients, 25 (11%) were admitted to an ICU with or without mechanical ventilation, and one patient died. The presence of diabetes [relative risk (RR), 3.0; 95% CI, 1.3-6.8; p = 0.007) or other comorbidities (RR, 5.9; 95% CI, 1.9-17.8; p = 0.002) was independently associated with poor outcome. To date, 20 (9%) patients have retested positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA after recovering and being discharged. Conclusion: The majority of patients in this case series were clinically classified as having moderate COVID-19. Older patients tended to present with greater levels of clinical severity. The prognosis for patients who were elderly or had diabetes or other chronic comorbidities was relatively poor.

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