Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
J Gen Intern Med ; 2022 Apr 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1782935

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: While hate crimes rose during the COVID-19 pandemic, few studies examined whether this pandemic-time racial discrimination has led to negative health consequences at the population level. OBJECTIVE: We examined whether experienced and perceived racial discrimination were associated with mental or behavioral health outcomes during the pandemic. DESIGN: In October 2020, we conducted a national survey with minorities oversampled that covered respondents' sociodemographic background and health-related information. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 2709 participants responded to the survey (response rate: 4.2%). MAIN MEASURES: The exposure variables included (1) experienced and encountered racial discrimination, (2) experienced racial and ethnic cyberbullying, and (3) perceived racial bias. Mental health outcomes were measured by psychological distress and self-rated happiness. Measures for behavioral health included sleep quality, change in cigarette smoking, and change in alcohol consumption. Weighted logistic regressions were performed to estimate the associations between the exposure variables and the outcomes, controlling for age, gender, race and ethnicity, educational attainment, household income, eligibility to vote, political party, COVID-19 infection, and geographic region. Separate regressions were performed in the six racial and ethnic subgroups: non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black, Hispanic, East Asian, South Asian, and Southeast Asian respondents. KEY RESULTS: Experienced racial discrimination was associated with higher likelihood of psychological distress (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.18, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.34-3.55). Experienced racial discrimination (AOR = 2.31, 95% CI: 1.34-3.99) and perceived racial bias (AOR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.00-1.09) were both associated with increased cigarette smoking. The associations between racial discrimination and mental distress and substance use were most salient among Black, East Asian, South Asian, and Hispanic respondents. CONCLUSIONS: Racial discrimination may be associated with higher likelihood of distress, and cigarette smoking among racial and ethnic minorities. Addressing racial discrimination is important for mitigating negative mental and behavioral health ramifications of the pandemic.

2.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(11): 931-937, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504374

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We examined associations of negative employment changes during the COVID-19 pandemic with mental health in a national sample of U.S. workers, and whether the associations differed by race. METHODS: Data were from the Health, Ethnicity, and Pandemic Study, a cross-sectional survey. The effects of negative employment changes on psychological distress in 1510 workers were examined via linear regression, and stratified analyses were conducted across racial subgroups. RESULTS: After adjustment for covariates, compared to workers with no change in employment, those who experienced permanent job loss had the highest psychological distress (ß and 95% CI = 3.27 [1.89, 4.65]). Permanent job loss had the greatest effect on psychological distress in Blacks and Asians. CONCLUSION: Negative employment changes related to the pandemic may have deleterious impacts on workers' mental health, with disproportionate effects on racial minorities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Cross-Sectional Studies , Employment , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Telemed Telecare ; : 1357633X211051677, 2021 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463096

ABSTRACT

Telehealth is an important source of health care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Evidence is scarce regarding disparities in telehealth utilization in the United States. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and factors associated with telehealth utilization among US adults. Our data came from the Health, Ethnicity, and Pandemic Study, a nationally representative survey conducted in October 2020, with 2554 adults ≥ 18 and an oversample of racial/ethnic minorities. Telehealth utilization was measured as self-reported teleconsultation with providers via email, text message, phone, video, and remote patient monitoring during the pandemic. Logistic regressions were performed to examine the association between telehealth use and factors at the individual, household, and community levels. Overall, 43% of the sample reported having used telehealth, representing 114.5 million adults in the nation. East and Southeast Asians used telehealth less than non-Hispanic Whites (OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.8). Being uninsured (compared with private insurance: OR = 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2-0.8), and those with limited broadband coverage in the community (OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.8) were less likely to use telehealth. There is a need to develop and implement more equitable policies and interventions at both the individual and community levels to improve access to telehealth services and reduce related disparities.

4.
Nutrients ; 13(10)2021 Sep 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438685

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on multiple lifestyle changes among adults in the United States (USA). METHODS: We conducted a survey, the Health, Ethnicity, and Pandemic (HEAP) Study, in October 2020 among USA adults. Participants were selected from the United States using 48 sampling strata, including age, race, ethnicity, education, and gender, and were asked to report five lifestyle behaviors (i.e., exercise time, screen time, fast-food meal consumption, alcohol drinking, and cigarette smoking) before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. The associations of sociodemographic factors with each lifestyle change were estimated using weighted multivariable logistic regression models. RESULTS: All 2709 HEAP participants were included in this study. Compared to pre-pandemic, the time spent on exercise decreased (32.06 vs. 38.65 min/day; p < 0.001) and screen time increased (6.79 vs. 5.06 h/day; p < 0.001) during the pandemic. The percentage of individuals who reported consuming fast-food meals ≥3 times/week decreased from 37.7% before the pandemic to 33.3% during the pandemic. The percentage of heavy drinkers (≥5 times/week) increased from 20.9% before the pandemic to 25.7% during the pandemic. Among smokers, heavy smoking (≥11 cigarettes/day) increased from 5.8% before the pandemic to 7.9% during the pandemic. We also identified subgroups who were more vulnerable to adverse influences from the pandemic, including racial/ethnic minority groups and young adults. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic had negative impacts on multiple lifestyle behaviors among Americans. Mitigating such negative impacts of COVID-19 requires effective interventions, particularly for some vulnerable subgroups.


Subject(s)
Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cigarette Smoking/epidemiology , Exercise/psychology , Fast Foods/statistics & numerical data , Screen Time , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Alcohol Drinking/psychology , Cigarette Smoking/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , /statistics & numerical data , Female , Health Behavior , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , /statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
5.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 18: E87, 2021 09 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404026

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Understanding trends and associated factors in internet-based health care communication (IBHC) among cancer survivors is important for meeting patient needs because their reliance on telehealth is growing. We aimed to examine IBHC use among cancer survivors in the US. METHODS: We identified adult cancer survivors aged 18 to 64 (n = 8,029) and 65 or older (n = 11,087) from the National Health Interview Survey in 2011-2018. We calculated temporal trends of self-reported IBHC in the previous year (filled a prescription, scheduled a medical appointment, or communicated with a health care provider) and used multivariable logistic models to identify associated factors. RESULTS: Approximately 84% of survivors had been diagnosed 2 years or more before the survey. IBHC prevalence increased among cancer survivors aged 18 to 64, from 19.3% to 40.2%, and among those aged 65 or older, from 11.4% to 22.6%, from 2011 to 2018 (P for trend <.001). Among both age groups, lower educational attainment, lack of usual source of care, and current smoking were associated with less IBHC, whereas residing in the South or West, having 1 or more chronic conditions, and drinking any alcohol were associated with higher IBHC (all P < .05). Factors associated with less IBHC also included being non-Hispanic Black or Hispanic, lacking private insurance, and being 11 or more years postdiagnosis among survivors aged 18 to 64; among survivors aged 65 or older, factors were being an older age, not married, and non-US born (all P < .05). CONCLUSION: IBHC among cancer survivors is common and increasing, with differences across sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics. As health care delivery continues adopting IBHC and other advanced telehealth techniques, disparities need to be addressed to ensure equitable access to care for all cancer survivors.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Telemedicine , Adult , Aged , Communication , Humans , Internet , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Survivors
6.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(11): 931-937, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315712

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We examined associations of negative employment changes during the COVID-19 pandemic with mental health in a national sample of U.S. workers, and whether the associations differed by race. METHODS: Data were from the Health, Ethnicity, and Pandemic Study, a cross-sectional survey. The effects of negative employment changes on psychological distress in 1510 workers were examined via linear regression, and stratified analyses were conducted across racial subgroups. RESULTS: After adjustment for covariates, compared to workers with no change in employment, those who experienced permanent job loss had the highest psychological distress (ß and 95% CI = 3.27 [1.89, 4.65]). Permanent job loss had the greatest effect on psychological distress in Blacks and Asians. CONCLUSION: Negative employment changes related to the pandemic may have deleterious impacts on workers' mental health, with disproportionate effects on racial minorities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Cross-Sectional Studies , Employment , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Am J Prev Med ; 61(1): 3-12, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240149

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Health insurance is associated with better care in the U.S., but little is known about the associations of coverage disruptions (i.e., periods without insurance) with care access, receipt, and affordability. METHODS: Adults aged 18-64 years with current private (n=124,746), public (n=30,932), or no (n=31,802) insurance coverage were identified from the 2011-2018 National Health Interview Survey. Data were analyzed in 2020. Separate multivariable logistic regressions evaluated the associations of having coverage disruptions or being uninsured with care access, receipt, and affordability. RESULTS: Overall, 5.0% of currently insured adults with private and 10.7% with public insurance reported a coverage disruption in the previous year, representing nearly 9.1 million adults in 2018. Among currently uninsured, 24.9% reported coverage loss within the previous year, representing nearly 8.1 million adults in 2018. Among adults with current private or current public coverage, disruptions were associated with lower receipt of all preventive services (AOR=0.42, 95% CI=0.37, 0.46 and AOR=0.48, 95% CI=0.40, 0.58, respectively), with forgoing any needed care because of cost (AOR=4.79, 95% CI=4.44, 5.17 and AOR=4.28, 95% CI=3.86, 4.75), and with medication nonadherence because of cost (AOR=3.55, 95% CI=3.13, 4.03 and AOR=4.09, 95% CI=3.43, 4.88) compared with that among adults with continuous coverage (p<0.05). Longer disruptions among currently insured adults were significantly associated with worse care access, receipt, and affordability, with dose-response patterns. Currently uninsured adults, especially those with longer uninsured periods, reported significantly worse care access, receipt, and affordability than currently insured adults with coverage disruptions or continuous coverage. CONCLUSIONS: Findings highlight the importance of continuous insurance coverage; disruptions owing to the COVID-19 pandemic will likely have adverse consequences for care access and affordability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Costs and Cost Analysis , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Insurance Coverage , Insurance, Health , Medically Uninsured , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
8.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 114(1): 156-159, 2022 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1061010

ABSTRACT

Cancer, and other underlying medical conditions including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart diseases, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and obesity, are associated with increased risk of severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) illness. We identified 6411 cancer survivors and 77 748 adults without a cancer history from the 2016-2018 National Health Interview Survey and examined the prevalence and sociodemographic factors associated with these conditions in the United States. Most survivors reported having 1 or more of the conditions (56.4%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 54.8% to 57.9%, vs 41.6%, 95% CI = 40.9% to 42.2%, in adults without a cancer history), and nearly one-quarter (22.9%, 95% CI = 21.6% to 24.3%) reported 2 or more, representing 8.7 million and 3.5 million cancer survivors, respectively. These conditions were more prevalent in survivors of kidney, liver, and uterine cancers as well as Black survivors and those with low socioeconomic status and public insurance. Findings highlight the need to protect survivors against COVID-19 transmission in health-care facilities and to prioritize cancer patients, survivors, caregivers, and their health-care providers in vaccine allocation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Adult , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL